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The Turdetani not only enjoy a salubrious climate, but their manners are polished and urbane, as also are those of the people of Keltica, by reason of their vicinity [to the Turdetani], or, according to Polybius, on account of their being of the same stock, but not to so great a degree, for they live for the most part scattered in villages. The Turdetani, on the other hand, especially those who dwell about the Guadalquiver,1 have so entirely adopted the Roman mode of life, as even to have forgotten their own language. They have for the most part become Latins,2 and received Roman colonists; so that a short time only is wanted before they will be all Romans. The very names of many of the towns at present, such as Pax Augusta3 amongst the Keltici, Augusta-Eme- rita4 amongst the Turduli, Cæsar-Augusta5 amongst the Keltiberians and certain other colonies, are proof of the change of manners I have spoken of. Those of the Iberians who adopt these new modes of life are styled togati. Amongst their number are the Keltiberians, who formerly were regarded as the most uncivilized of them all. So much for these.

1 Bæctis.

2 That is, been admitted to all the privileges of Roman citizenship. Pliny tells us that in Bætica alone there were thirty cities enjoying this distinction.

3 Beja in Alentejo: others, with less show of probability, say Badajoz the capital of Estremadura.

4 Merida.

5 Saragossa.

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