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The poet frequently speaks of places in succession as they are situated;

“ they who inhabited Hyria, and Aulis;1
and they who occupied Argos, and Tiryns,
Hermione, and Asine,
Trœzen, and Eiones.

Il. ii. 559.
At other times he does not observe any order;

“ Schœnus, and Scolus,
Thespeia, and Græa.2

Il. ii. 497.
He also mentions together places on the continent and islands;

“ they who held Ithaca,
and inhabited Crocyleia,3

Il. ii. 632.
for Crocyleia is in Acarnania. Thus he here joins with Ægina Mases, which belongs to the continent of Argolis.

Homer does not mention Thyreæ, but other writers speak of it as well known. It was the occasion of a contest between the three hundred Argives against the same number of Lacedæmonians; the latter were conquerors by means of a stratagem of Othryadas. Thucydides places Thyreæ in Cynuria, on the confines of Argia and Laconia.4

Hysiæ also is a celebrated place in Argolica; and Cenchreæ, which lies on the road from Tegea to Argos, over the mountain Parthenius, and the Creopolus.5 But Homer was not acquainted with either of these places, [nor with the Lyrceium, nor Orneæ, and yet they are villages in the Argian territory; the former of the same name as the mountain there; the latter of the same name as the Orneæ, situated between Corinth and Sicyon].6 18. Among the cities of the Peloponnesus, the most celebrated were, and are at this time, Argos and Sparta, and as their renown is spread everywhere, it is not necessary to describe them at length, for if we did so, we should seem to repeat what is said by all writers.

Anciently, Argos was the most celebrated, but afterwards the Lacedæmonians obtained the superiority, and continued to maintain their independence, except during some short interval, when they experienced a reverse of fortune.

The Argives did not admit Pyrrhus within the city. He fell before the walls, an old woman having let a tile drop from a house upon his head.

They were, however, under the sway of other kings. When they belonged to the Achæan league they were subjected, together with the other members of that confederacy, to the power of the Romans. The city subsists at present, and is second in rank to Sparta.

1 Il. ii. 496.

2 Il. ii. 497.

3 Il. ii. 632.

4 Thucyd. ii. 27; iv. 56.

5 A place not known.

6 Probably interpolated.

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