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The poet mentions Alalcomenæ,1 but not in the Cata logue;.

“ the Argive Juno and Minerva of Alalcomenæ.2

Il. iv. 8.
It has an ancient temple of Minerva, which is held in great veneration. It is said that this was the place of her birth, as Argos was that of Juno, and that Homer gave to both these goddesses designations derived from their native places. Perhaps for this reason he has not mentioned, in the Catalogue, the inhabitants; for having a sacred character, they were exempted from military service. Indeed the city has never suffered devastation by an enemy, although it is inconsiderable in size, and its position is weak, for it is situated in a plain. All in reverence to the goddess abstained from every act of violence; wherefore the Thebans, at the time of the expedition of the Epigoni, abandoning their own city, are said to have taken refuge here, and on the strong mountain above it, the Tilphossium.3 Below Tilphossium is the fountain Tilphossa, and the monument of Teiresias, who died there on the retreat.

1 Sulinari.

2 Il. iv. 8.

3 Petra.

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