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Philip Marches Through Laconia

While the Lacedaemonians were thus thoroughly terrified at the unexpected danger, and at a loss what to do to meet it, Philip encamped on the first day at Amyclae: a place in Laconia about twenty stades from Lacedaemon, exceedingly rich in forest and corn, and containing a temple of Apollo, which is about the most splendid of all the temples in Laconia, situated in that quarter of the city which slopes down towards the sea. Next day the king descended to a place called the Camp of Pyrrhus,1 wasting the country as he went.
Carnium.
After devastating the neighbouring districts for the two following days, he encamped near Carnium; thence he started for Asine, and after some fruitless assaults upon it, he started again, and thenceforth devoted himself to plundering all the country bordering on the Cretan Sea as far as Taenarum.
Gythium.
Then, once more changing the direction of his march, he advanced to Gythium, the naval arsenal of Sparta, which possesses a safe harbour, and is about thirty stades from the city.
Helos.
Then leaving this on the right, he pitched his camp in the territory of Helos, which of all the districts of Laconia is the most extensive and most beautiful. Thence he sent out foraging parties and wasted the country with fire and sword, and destroyed the crops in it: pushing his devastation as far as Acriae and Leucae, and even to the district of Boeae.

1 A memorial, apparently, of the fruitless expedition of Pyrrhus into Laconia in B.C. 272.

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Laconia (Greece) (4)
Helos (2)
Gythium (Greece) (2)
Lacedaemon (Greece) (1)
Boeae (1)
Asine (Greece) (1)
Acriae (1)

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272 BC (1)
hide References (9 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 34.28
    • Titus Livius (Livy), Ab urbe condita libri, erklärt von M. Weissenborn, books 33-34, commentary, 34.29
  • Cross-references to this page (7):
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), A´SINE
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), BOEAE
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), GYTHIUM
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), HELOS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), LAS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), LEUCAE
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), PYRRHI CASTRA
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