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Enter CAPPADOX, from the Temple.

CAPPADOX
to himself . The man to whom the Gods are propitious, they cannot, I think, be angered with him. After I ad finished my devotions, it then came into my mind, lest the banker should abscond, to go fetch the money, that I may make good cheer rather than he.

THERAPONTIGONUS
I had left my compliments for you at your house.

CAPPADOX
Therapontigonus Platagidorus, save you; since you are come safe to Epidaurus this day, at my house--you won't lick up one grain of salt1.

THERAPONTIGONUS
You give me a kind invitation; things, however, are in a train for it to go badly with yourself. But how fares my purchase at your house?

CAPPADOX
Why, not at my house at all. Don't be bringing your witnesses--assuredly, I don't owe you anything.

THERAPONTIGONUS
How's that?

CAPPADOX
What I was bound on oath to do, I've done.

THERAPONTIGONUS
Will you give me up the girl or not, before I spit you with this sabre of mine, you whip-scoundrel?

CAPPADOX
I bid you go to perdition with all my heart; don't you be terrifying me. She has been carried off; you shall e carried off hence away from me, beyond a doubt, if you persist in abusing me, to whom I owe nothing but a punishing.

THERAPONTIGONUS
What, threaten me with a punishing?

CAPPADOX
Aye, and by my troth, I'll not be threatening, but I'll give it, if you persist in being impertinent to me.

THERAPONTIGONUS
A Procurer, forsooth, threatening me; and are my combats in battle, so many in number, lying trodden under foot? But so may my sabre and my shield * * * * * trustily aid me when fighting in the field; unless the girl is restored to me, I'll at once cause the ants to carry you away piecemeal from this spot.

CAPPADOX
And so may my tweezers2, my comb, my looking-glass, my crisping-iron, and my hair-scissors and scrubbing-towel love me well, I don't value your high-sounding words, nor these big threats of yours, a bit the more than my servant-girl that washes out my sink. I've given her up to him who brought the money from you.

THERAPONTIGONUS
What person was that?

CAPPADOX
He said that he was Summanus, your freed-man.

THERAPONTIGONUS
Mine? You don't say so; i' faith, it's that Curculio that has put a trick upon me, when I think upon it; he stole my ring from me.

CAPPADOX
aside . The Captain has been finely appointed to a cashiered company3.

THERAPONTIGONUS
Where now shall I find Curculio4?

CAPPADOX
In some wheat with the greatest ease I'll make you find even five hundred Curculios instead of one. Therefore I'm off; fare you well, and my service to you. (Exit.)

THERAPONTIGONUS
Fare you ill, a plague attend you. What shall I do? Shall I stop or go away? That I should have been imposed upon in this way! I'd like to give a reward to him who would point out that fellow to me. (Exit.)

1 Lick up one grain of salt: He pretends that he is going to invite him; but, stopping short, ends by saying that he shall not even taste salt with him. ἄλαλεχε̂ιν, "to lick salt," Erasmus, in his Adagia, tells os was a proverbial expression, denoting "to live sparingly."

2 So may my tweezers: We might almost fancy that it was a barber speaking, from this mention of the implements of his trade. Probably Cappadox employed these articles himself, in putting the best appearance upon his commodities, that they might the more readily attract the public.

3 Appointed to a cashiered company: He remarks that the Captain has been made a fool of, just in the same way as if he had received a commission in a disbanded maniple, or company.

4 Find Curculio: He asks where he can find Curculio. That word signifying not only the Parasite's name, but "a weevil" as well, Cappadox tells him that he may find hundreds of them in wheat.

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