previous next

Enter CALLIDAMATES, at a distance, drunk, and DELPHIUIM, followed by a SERVANT.

CALLIDAMATES
to his SERVANT . I want you to come for me1 in good time to the house of Philolaches; listen you; well then! those are your orders. Exit SERVANT. For from the place where I was, thence did I betake myself off;> so confoundedly tired was I there. with the entertainment and the discourse. Now I'll go to Philolaches to have a bout there he'll receive us with jovial feelings and handsomely. Do I seem to you to be fairly drenched, my bubsy?

DELPHIUM
You ought always to live pursuing this course of life.

CALLIDAMATES
Should you like, then, for me to hug you, and you me?

DELPHIUM
If you've a mind to do so, of course.

CALLIDAMATES
You are a charming one. He stumbles. Do hold me up, there's a dear.

DELPHIUM
holding him by the arm . Take care you don't fall. Stand up.

CALLIDAMATES
O! you are the apple of my eye. I'm your fosterling, my honey. He stumbles.

DELPHIUM
still holding him up . Only do take care that you don't recline in the street, before we get to a place where a couch is ready laid.

CALLIDAMATES
Do let me fall.

DELPHIUM
Well, I'll let you. Lets go.

CALLIDAMATES
dragging her as he falls . But that as well which I've got hold of in my hand.

DELPHIUM
If you fall, you shan't fall without me falling with you. Then some one shall pick us both up as we lie Aside. The man's quite drenched.

CALLIDAMATES
overhearing . Do you say that I am drenched, my bubsy?

DELPHIUM
Give me your hand; I really do not want * * you hurt.

CALLIDAMATES
giving his hand . There now, take it.

DELPHIUM
Come, move on with me.

CALLIDAMATES
Where am I going, do you know?

DELPHIUM
I know.

CALLIDAMATES
It has just come into my head: why, of course I'm going home for a booze.

DELPHIUM
Why yes, really now I do remember that.

PHILOLACHES
Won't you let me go to find them, my life? Of all persons I wish well to him especially. I'll return just now. Goes forward towards the door.

PHILEMATIUM
That "just now" is a long time to me.

CALLIDAMATES
going to the door and knocking . Is there any person here?

PHILOLACHES
'Tis he.

CALLIDAMATES
turning round . Bravo! Philolaches, good day to you, most friendly to me of all men.

PHILOLACHES
May the Gods bless you. Pointing to a couch. Take your place, Callidamates. He takes his place. Whence are you betaking yourself?

CALLIDAMATES
Whence a drunken man does.

PHILOLACHES
Well said. But, my Delphium, do take your place, there's a dear. She takes her place on a couch.

CALLIDAMATES
Give her something to drink. I shall go to sleep directly. Nods and goes to sleep.

PHILOLACHES
He doesn't do anything wonderful or strange. What shall I do with him then, my dear?

DELPHIUM
Let him alone just as he is.

PHILOLACHES
Come, you boy. Meanwhile, speedily pass the goblet round, beginning with Delphium.

1 You to come for me: Though none of the Editions say so, it is not improbable that this is said to Phaniscus, who, in the sequel, comes to fetch Callidamates home. The duties of the "adversitor" have been alluded to in a previous Note.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Latin (F. Leo, 1895)
hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (30 total)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: