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PAMPHILUS and DAVUS.

PAMPHILUS
What then does my father mean? Why does he thus make pretense?

DAVUS
I'll tell you. If now he were angry with you, because Chremes will not give you a wife, he would seem to himself to be unjust, and that not without reason, before he has ascertained your feelings as to the marriage, how they are disposed. But if you refuse to marry her, in that case he will transfer the blame to you; then such disturbances will arise.

PAMPHILUS
I will submit to any thing from him.

DAVUS
He is your father, Pamphilus. It is a difficult matter. Besides, this woman is defenseless. No sooner said than done; he will find some pretext for driving her away from the city.

PAMPHILUS
Driving her away ?

DAVUS
Aye, and quickly too.

PAMPHILUS
Tell me then, Davus, what am I to do?

DAVUS
Say that you will marry her.

PAMPHILUS
starting. Ha!

DAVUS
What's the matter ?

PAMPHILUS
What, am I to say so?

DAVUS
Why not?

PAMPHILUS
Never will I do it.

DAVUS
Don't say so.

PAMPHILUS
Don't attempt to persuade me.

DAVUS
Consider what will be the result of it.

PAMPHILUS
That I shall be deprived of the one, and fixed with the other.

DAVUS
Not so. In fact, I think it will be thus: Your father will say: "I wish you to marry a wife to-day." You reply: " I'll marry her." Tell me, how can he raise a quarrel with you ? Thus you will cause all the plans which are now arranged by him to be disarranged, without any danger; for this is not to be doubted, that Chremes will not give you his daughter. Therefore do not hesitate in those measures which you are taking, on this account, lest he should change his sentiments. Tell your father that you consent; so that although he may desire it, he may not be able to be angry at you with reason. For that which you rely on, I will easily refute; "No one," you think, "will give a wife to a person of these habits." But he will find a beggar for you, rather than allow you to be corrupted by a mistress. If, however, he shall believe that you bear it with a contented mind, you will render him indifferent; at his leisure he will look out for another wife for you; in the mean time something lucky may turn up.

PAMPHILUS
Do you think so?

DAVUS
It really is not a matter of doubt.

PAMPHILUS
Consider to what you are persuading me.

DAVUS
Nay, but do be quiet.

PAMPHILUS
Well, I'll say it; but, that he mayn't come to know that she has had a child by me, is a thing to be guarded against; for I have promised to bring it up.

DAVUS
Oh, piece of effrontery.

PAMPHILUS
She entreated me that I would give her this pledge, by which she might be sure she should not be deserted.

DAVUS
It shall be attended to; but your father's coming. Take care that he doesn't perceive that you are out of spirits.

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