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Enter CHREMES.

SIMO
I greet you, Chremes.

CHREMES
O, you are the very person I was looking for.

SIMO
And I for you.

CHREMES
You meet me at a welcome moment. Some persons have been to me, to say that they had heard from you, that my daughter was to be married to your son to-day; I've come to see whether they are out of their senses or you.

SIMO
Listen; in a few words you shall learn both what I want of you, and what you seek to know.

CHREMES
I am listening; say what you wish.

SIMO
By the Gods, I do entreat you, Chremes, and by our friendship, which, commencing with our infancy, has grown up with our years, and by your only daughter and by my own son (of preserving whom the entire power lies with you), that you will assist me in this matter; and that, just as this marriage was about to be celebrated, it may be celebrated.

CHREMES
O, don't importune me; as though you needed to obtain this of me by entreaty. Do you suppose I am different now from what I was formerly, when I promised her? If it is for the advantage of them both that it should take place, order her to be sent for. But if from this course there would result more harm than advantage for each, this I do beg of you, that you will consult for their common good, as though she were your own daughter, and I the father of Pamphilus.

SIMO
Nay, so I intend, and so I wish it to be, Chremes; and I would not ask it of you, did not the occasion itself require it.

CHREMES
What is the matter?

SIMO
There is a quarrel between Glycerium and my son.

CHREMES
ironically. I hear you.

SIMO
So munch so, that I'm in hopes they may be separated.

CHREMES
Nonsense!

SIMO
It really is so.

CHREMES
After this fashion, i'faith, I tell you, "the quarrels of lovers are the renewal of love."

SIMO
Well--this I beg of you, that we may prevent it. While an opportunity offers, and while his passion is cooled by affronts, before the wiles of these women and their tears, craftily feigned, bring back his love-sick mind to compassion, let us give him a wife. I trust, Chremes, that, when attached by intimacy and a respectable marriage, he will easily extricate himself from these evils.

CHREMES
So it appears to you; but I do not think 1 that either he can possibly hold to her with constancy, or that I can put up with it if he does not.

SIMO
How then can you be sure of that, unless you make the experiment?

CHREMES
But for that experiment to be made upon a daughter is a serious thing----

SIMO
Why look, all the inconvenience in fine amounts to this--possibly, which may the Gods forfend, a separation may take place. But if he is reformed, see how many are the advantages: in the first place, you will have restored a son to your friend; you will obtain a sure son-in-law 2 for yourself, and a husband for your daughter.

CHREMES
What is one to say to all this? If you feel persuaded that this is beneficial, I don't wish that any advantage should be denied you.

SIMO
With good reason, Chremes, have I always considered you a most valuable friend.

CHREMES
But how say you----?"

SIMO
What?

CHREMES
How do you know that they are now at variance?

SIMO
Davus himself, who is privy to all their plans, has told me so; and he advises me to expedite the match as fast as I can. Do you think he would do so, unless he was aware that my son desired it? You yourself as well shall presently hear what he says. Goes to the door of his house and calls. Halloo there! Call Davus out here. Look, here he is; I see him just coming out.

1 But I do not think: -4. “"At ego non posse arbitror neque illum hanc perpetuo habere."” Chremes uses an ambiguous expression here, perhaps purposely. It may mean, "I do not think that he can possibly be constant to her," or, "that she will continue to live with him."

2 A sure son-in-law: By the use of the word “"firmum,"” he means a son-in-law who will not be likely to resort to divorce or separation from his wife.

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load focus Latin (Edward St. John Parry, Edward St. John Parry, M.A., 1857)
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hide References (2 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (1):
    • George W. Mooney, Commentary on Apollonius: Argonautica, 3.985
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar for Schools and Colleges, VERBS
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