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Enter CHARINUS, wringing his hands.

CHARINUS
to himself. Is this to be believed or spoken of; that malice so great could be inborn in any one as to exult at misfortunes, and to derive advantage from the distresses of another! Oh, is this true? Assuredly, that is the most dangerous class of men, in whom there is only a slight degree of hesitation at refusing; afterward, when the time arrives for fulfilling their promises, then, obliged, of necessity they discover themselves. They are afraid, and yet the circumstances 1 compel them to refuse. Then, in that case, their very insolent remark is, "Who are you? What are you to me? What should I give up) to you what's my own? Look you, I am the most concerned in my own interests." 2 But if you inquire where is honor, they are not ashamed. 3 Here, where there is occasion, they are not afraid; there, where there is no occasion, they are afraid. But what am I to do? Ought I not to go to him, and reason with him upon this outrage, and heap many an invective upon him? Yet some one may say, "you will avail nothing." Nothing? At least I shall have vexed him, and have given vent to my own feelings. Enter PAMPHILUS and DAVUS.

PAMPHILUS
Charinus, unintentionally I have ruined both myself and you, unless the Gods in some way befriend us.

CHARINUS
Unintentionally, is it! An excuse has been discovered at last. You have broken your word.

PAMPHILUS
How so, pray?

CHARINUS
Do you expect to deceive me a second time by these speeches?

PAMPHILUS
What does this mean?

CHARINUS
Since I told you that I loved her, she has become quite pleasing to you. Ah wretched me! to have judged of your disposition from my own.

PAMPHILUS
You are mistaken.

CHARINUS
Did this pleasure appear to you not to be quite complete, unless you tantalized me in my passion, and lured me on by groundless hopes?--You may take her.

PAMPHILUS
I, take her? Alas! you know not in what perplexities, to my sorrow, I am involved, and what vast anxieties this executioner of mine pointing to DAVUS has contrived for me by his devices.

CHARINUS
What is it so wonderful, if he takes example from yourself?

PAMPHILUS
You would not say that if you understood either myself or my affection.

CHARINUS
I'm quite aware ironically ; you have just now had a dispute with your father, and he is now angry with you in consequence, and has not been able to-day to prevail upon you to marry her.

PAMPHILUS
No, not at all,--as you are not acquainted with my sorrows, these nuptials were not in preparation for me; and no one was thinking at present of giving me a wife.

CHARINUS
I am aware; you have been influenced by your own inclination.

PAMPHILUS
Hold; you do not yet know all.

CHARINUS
For my part, I certainly do know that you are about to marry her.

PAMPHILUS
Why are you torturing me to death? Listen to this. He pointing to DAVUS never ceased to urge me to tell my father that I would marry her; to advise and persuade me, even until he compelled me.

CHARINUS
Who was this person?

PAMPHILUS
Davus.

CHARINUS
Davus! For what reason?

PAMPHILUS
I don't know; except that I must have been under the displeasure of the Gods, for me to have listened to him.

CHARINUS
Is this the fact, Davus?

DAVUS
It is the fact.

CHARINUS
starting. Ha! What do you say, you villain? Then may the Gods send you an end worthy of your deeds. Come now, tell me, if all his enemies had wished him to be plunged into a marriage, what advice but this could they have given?

DAVUS
I have been deceived, but I don't despair.

CHARINUS
ironically. I'm sure of that.

DAVUS
This way it has not succeeded; we'll try another. Unless, perhaps, you think that because it failed at first, this misfortune can not now possibly be changed for better luck.

PAMPHILUS
Certainly not; for I quite believe that if you set about it, you will be making two marriages for me out of one.

DAVUS
I owe you this, Pamphilus, in respect of my servitude, to strive with hands and feet, night and day; to submit to hazard of my life, to serve you. It is your part, if any thing has fallen out contrary to expectation, to forgive me. What I was contriving has not succeeded; still, I am using all endeavors; or, do you yourself devise something better, and dismiss me.

PAMPHILUS
I wish to; restore me to the position in which you found me.

DAVUS
I'll do so.

PAMPHILUS
But it must be done directly.

DAVUS
But the door of Glycerium's house here makes a noise. 4

PAMPHILUS
That's nothing to you.

DAVUS
assuming an attitude of meditation. I'm in search of----

PAMPHILUS
ironically. Dear me, what, now at last?

DAVUS
Presently I'll give you what I've hit upon.

1 The circumstances: “"Res."” According, however, to Donatus, this word has the meaning here of "malice" or "spitefulness."

2 Concerned in my own interests: Equivalent to our sayings, "Charity begins at home;" "Take care of number one."

3 They are not ashamed: Terence has probably borrowed this remark from the Epidicus of Plautus, 1. 165-6: "Generally all men are ashamed when it is of no use; when they ought to be ashamed, then does shame forsake them, when occasion is for them to be ashamed."

4 Makes a noise: The doors with the Romans opened in-wardly, while those of the Greeks opened on the outside. It was therefore usual with them, when coming out, to strike the door on the inside with a stick or with the knuckles, that those outside might be warned to get out of the way. Patrick, however, observes with some justice, that the word “"concrepuit"” may here allude to the creaking of the hinges. See the Curculio of Plautus, l. 160, where the Procuress pours water on the hinges, in order that Cappadox may not hear the opening of the door.

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