previous next

Enter DAVUS from the house of GLYCERIUM.

DAVUS
aloud at the door, not seeing SIMO and CHREMES. Now then, I bid you set your minds at ease.

CHREMES
to SIMO. See you, there's Davus.

SIMO
From what house is he coming out?

DAVUS
to himself. Through my means, and that of the stranger----

SIMO
overhearing. What mischief is this?

DAVUS
to himself. I never did see a more opportune person, encounter, or occasion.

SIMO
The rascal! I wonder who it is he's praising?

DAVUS
All the affair is now in a safe position.

SIMO
Why do I delay to accost him?

DAVUS
to himself, catching sight of SIMO. It's my master; what am I to do?

SIMO
accosting him. O, save you, good sir!

DAVUS
affecting surprise. Hah! Simo! O, Chremes, my dear sir, all things are now quite ready in-doors.

SIMO
ironically. You have taken such very good care.

DAVUS
Send for the bride when you like.

SIMO
Very good: ironically of course, that's the only thing that's now wanting here. But do you answer me this, what business had you there? Pointing to the house of GLYCERIUM.

DAVUS
What, I?

SIMO
Just so.

DAVUS
I?

SIMO
Yes, you.

DAVUS
I went in just now.

SIMO
As if I asked how long ago!

DAVUS
Together with your son.

SIMO
What, is Phamphilus in there? Aside. To my confusion, I'm on the rack! To DAVUS. How now? Didn't you say that there was enmity between them, you scoundrel?

DAVUS
There is.

SIMO
Why is he there, then?

CHREMES
Why do you. suppose he is? Ironically. Quarreling with her, of course.

DAVUS
Nay but, Chremes, I'll let you now hear from me a disgraceful piece of business. An old man, I don't know who he is, has just now come here; look you, he is a confident and shrewd person; when you look at his appearance, he seems to be a person of some consequence. There is a grave sternness in his features, and something commanding in his words.

SIMO
What news are you bringing, I wonder?

DAVUS
Why nothing but what I heard him mention.

SIMO
What does he say then?

DAVUS
That he knows Glycerium to be a citizen of Attica.

SIMO
going to his door. Ho there! Dromo, Dromo! Enter DROMO hastily from the house.

DROMO
What is it?

SIMO
Dromo!

DAVUS
Hear me.

SIMO
If you add a word----Dromo!

DAVUS
Hear me, pray.

DROMO
to SIMO. What do you want?

SIMO
pointing to DAVUS. Carry him off on your shoulders in-doors as fast as possible.

DROMO
Whom?

SIMO
Davus.

DAVUS
For what reason?

SIMO
Because I choose. To. DROMO. Carry him off, I say.

DAVUS
What have I done?

SIMO
Carry him off.

DAVUS
If you find that I have told a lie in any one matter, then kill me.

SIMO
I'll hear nothing. I'll soon have you set in motion. 1

DAVUS
What? Although this is the truth.

SIMO
In spite of it. To DROMO. Take care he's kept well secured; and, do you hear? Tie him up hands and feet together. 2 Now then, be off; upon my faith this very day, if I live, I'll teach you what hazard there is in deceiving a master, and him in deceiving a father. DROMO leads DAVUS into the house.

CHREMES
Oh, don't be so extremely vexed.

SIMO
O Chremes, the dutifulness of a son! Do you not pity me? That I should endure so much trouble for such a son! Goes to the door of GLYCERIUM'S house. Come, Pamphilus, come out, Pamphilus! have you any shame left?

1 You set in motion: By the use of the word “"Commotus"” he seems to allude to the wretched, restless existence of a man tied hand and foot, and continually working at the hand-mill. Westerhovius thinks that Simo uses this word sarcastically, in allusion to the words of Davus, at the beginning of the present Scene, "Animo otioso esse impero;" "I bid you set your minds at ease."

2 Hands and feet together: “"Quadrupedem."” Literally "as a quadruped" or "all fours." Echard remarks that it was the custom of the Athenians to tie criminals hands and feet together, just like calves.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Latin (Edward St. John Parry, Edward St. John Parry, M.A., 1857)
hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Sort places alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a place to search for it in this document.
Attica (Greece) (1)

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (2 total)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: