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Enter BACCHIS and ANTIPHILA at a distance.

BACCHIS.
Upon my word, my dear Antiphila, I commend you, and think you fortunate in having made it your study that your manners should be conformable to those good looks of yours: and so may the Gods bless me, I do not at all wonder if every man is in love with you. For your discourse has been a proof to me what kind of disposition you possess. And when now I reflect in my mind upon your way of life, and that of all of you, in fact, who keep the public at a distance from yourselves, it is not surprising both that you are of that disposition, and that we are not; for it is your interest to be virtuous; those, with whom we are acquainted, will not allow us to be so. For our lovers, allured merely by our beauty, court us for that; when that has faded, they transfer their affections elsewhere; and unless we have made provision in the mean time for the future, we live in destitution. Now with you, when you have once resolved to pass your life with one man whose manners are especially kindred to your own, those persons1 become attached to you. By this kindly feeling, you are truly devoted to each other; and no calamity can ever possibly interrupt your love.

ANTIPHILA
I know nothing about other women: I'm sure that I have, indeed, always used every endeavor to derive my own happiness from his happiness.

CLINIA
apart, overhearing ANTIPHILA. Ah! 'tis for that reason, my Antiphila, that you alone have now caused me to return to my native country; for while I was absent from you, all other hardships which I encountered were light to me, save the being deprived of you.

SYRUS
apart. I believe it.

CLINIA
apart. Syrus, I can scarce endure it!2 Wretch that I am, that I should not be allowed to possess one of such a disposition at my own discretion!

SYRUS
Nay, so far as I understand your father, he will for a long time yet be giving you a hard task.

BACCHIS.
Why, who is that young man that's looking at us?

ANTIPHILA
seeing CLINIA. Ah! do support me, I entreat you!

BACCHIS.
Prithee, what is the matter with you?

ANTIPHILA
I shall die, alas! I shall die!

BACCHIS.
Why are you thus surprised, Antiphila?

ANTIPHILA
Is it Clinia that I see, or not?

BACCHIS.
Whom do you see?

CLINIA
running to embrace ANTIPHILA. Blessings on you, my life!

ANTIPHILA
Oh my long-wished for Clinia, blessings on you!

CLINIA
How fare you, my love?

ANTIPHILA
I'm overjoyed that you have returned safe.

CLINIA
And do I embrace you, Antiphila, so passionately longed for by my soul?

SYRUS
Go in-doors; for the old gentleman has been waiting for us some time. They go into the house of CHREMES.

1 A man whose manners--those persons: "Cujus--hi ;" a change of number by the use of the figure Enallage.

2 I can scarce endure it: Colman has the following remark on this passage: "Madame Dacier, contrary to the authority of all editions and MSS., adopts a conceit of her father's in this place, and places this speech to Clitipho, whom she supposes to have retired to a hiding-place, where he might overhear the conversation, and from whence he peeps out to make this speech to Syrus. This she calls an agreeable jeu de th£eâtre, and doubts not but all lovers of Terence will be obliged to her father for so ingenious a remark; but it is to be feared that critical sagacity will not be so lavish of acknowledgments as filial piety. There does not appear the least foundation for this remark in the Scene, nor has the Poet given us the least room to doubt of Clitipho being actually departed. To me, instead of an agreeable jeu de th£eâtre, it appears a most absurd and ridiculous device; particularly vicious in this place, as it most injudiciously tends to interrupt the course of Clinia's more interesting passion, so admirably delineated in this little Scene."

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