previous next

Enter ANTIPHO, at a distance.

ANTIPHO
to himself. Indeed, Antipho, in many ways you are to be blamed for these feelings; to have thus run away, and intrusted your existence to the protection of other people. Did you suppose that others would give more attention to your interests than your own self? For, however other matters stood, certainly you should have thought of her whom you have now at home, that she might not suffer- any harm in consequence of her confiding in you, whose hopes and resources, poor thing, are all now centred in yourself alone.

GETA
coming forward. Why really, master, we have for some time been censuring you here in your absence, for having thus gone away.

ANTIPHO
You are the very person I was looking for.

GETA
But still, we were not a bit the more remiss on that account.

ANTIPHO
Tell me, I beg of you, in what posture are my interests and fortunes. Has my father any suspicion?

GETA
Not any at present.

ANTIPHO
Is there still any hope?

GETA
I don't know.

ANTIPHO
Alas!

GETA
But Phaedria has not neglected to use his endeavors in your behalf.

ANTIPHO
He did nothing new.

GETA
Then Phormio, too; in this matter, just as in every thing else, showed himself a man of energy.

ANTIPHO
What did he do?

GETA
With his words he silenced the old man, who was very angry.

ANTIPHO
Well done, Phormio!

GETA
I, too, did all I could.

ANTIPHO
My dear Geta, I love you all.

GETA
The commencement is just in this position, as I tell you: matters, at present; are going on smoothly, and your father intends to wait for your uncle till he arrives.

ANTIPHO
Why him?

GETA
He said he was wishful to act by his advice, in all that relates to this business.

ANTIPHO
How greatly now, Geta, I do dread my uncle's safe arrival! For, according to his single sentence, from what I hear, I am to live or die.

GETA
Here comes Phaedria.

ANTIPHO
Where is he, pray?

GETA
See, he's coming from his place of exercise.1

1 From his place of exercise: "Palaestra." He alludes to the Procurer's house under this name.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Latin (Edward St. John Parry, Edward St. John Parry, M.A., 1857)
hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (4 total)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: