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[119]

Now forsooth, since you have seen the good faith of the master, listen to the justice of the pupil. I have already said before, that two slaves have been continually begged of them to be put to the question. You have always refused it, O Titus Roscius. I ask of you whether they who asked it were unworthy to obtain it? or had he, on whose behalf they asked it, no influence with you? or did the matter itself appear unjust? The most noble and respectable men of our state, whom I have named before, made the request, who have lived in such a manner, and are so esteemed by the Roman people, that there is no one who would not think whatever they said reasonable. And they made the request on behalf of a most miserable and unfortunate man, who would wish even himself to be submitted to the torture, provided the inquiry into his father's death might go on.


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  • Commentary references to this page (2):
    • E. H. Donkin, Cicero Pro Roscio Amerino , Edited, after Karl Halm., XXVIII
    • E. H. Donkin, Cicero Pro Roscio Amerino , Edited, after Karl Halm., XXXVI
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