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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 102 102 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 34 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 34 34 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 33 33 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 27 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 20 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 19 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 13, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 9th or search for 9th in all documents.

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Still later from Europe. The steamer Columbia, with Liverpool advices to the 29th ult., arrived at St. John's on the 9th inst. She brings the following news: Earl Russell made an important speech on foreign affairs, at Blair Gourie, Scotland, and referred at considerable length to the American question. He justified England in recognizing the Confederates as belligerents, and answered some imputations brought by the people of the North, particularly the speech of Senator Sumner. He also replied to the complaint of the South in regard to the recognition of the blockade, and asserted that although self-interest demanded that England should break it she prefers the course of honor, as it would have been infamous to break it. He showed that the Government had not sufficient evidence against the Alabama to detain her until after she had sailed, and explained the difficulties in the way of interference in such cases. He drew a line between ordinary vessels equipped for wa