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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
he enemy having retreated toward Goldsborough during the night. Preparations were at once made for a movement on Goldsborough in two columns-one from Wilmington, and the other from New Berne, and to repair the railroads leading there from each place, as well as to supply General Sherman by Cape Fear River, toward Fayetteville, if it became necessary. The column from New Berne was attacked on the 8th of March at Wise's Forks, and driven back with the loss of several hundred prisoners. On the 11th the enemy renewed his attack upon our intrenched position, but was repulsed with severe loss, and fell back during the night. On the 14th the Neuse River was crossed and Kinston occupied, and on the 21st Goldsborough was entered. The column from Wilmington reached Cox's Bridge, on the Neuse River, tel miles above Goldsborough, on the 22d. By the 1st of February General Sherman's whole army was in motion from Savannah. He captured Columbia, S. C., on the 17th; thence moved on Goldsborou
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
renchments on Poplar Creek Hill, where they opened on McCook's troops with two pieces of artillery. Our loss was 136 men and 15 officers killed, wounded, and missing; among the latter Colonel La Grange, of the First Wisconsin, who was captured. The enemy's loss was greater than ours. General Hooker was directed to send another division from his command to Snake Creek Gap, with instructions to repair the road through the gap so as to facilitate the passage of infantry and wagons. On the 11th it was decided to leave one corps (Howard's), supported by Stoneman's and McCook's divisions of cavalry, and move to Snake Creek Gap with the balance of the army, attacking the enemy in force from that quarter, while Howard was keeping t p the impression of a direct attack on Buzzard Roost. This movement was to commence on the 12th. Instructions were given to corps commanders to provide their commands with ten days rations and a good supply of ammunition, sending all surplus wagons back to
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
hlight. On the 7th we marched at sunrise, crossing Pumpkin Vine Creek at 9 a. m. On the 8th we joined the First Division, Fourth Army Corps, near Acworth, Ga., remaining until the 10th, when we moved to the front five companies, deployed as skirmishers, under command of Major Calloway. At about 1 p. m. the skirmishers became engaged with the enemy, and continued warmly engaged throughout the day, the enemy hotly contesting every foot of ground, the Twenty-first losing 2 men wounded. On the 11th we threw up light works. On the 12th did nothing. On the 13th we continued skirmishing with the enemy by details made from the regiment, the enemy being compelled to take refuge in his works located on Pine Mountain, a strong position almost north of Kenesaw Mountain. On the morning of the 15th it was found that the enemy had evacuated during the night. We immediately moved forward and halted in sight of College Hill, near Marietta, Ga., at 8 a. m. We again moved at 10 a. m., and at sunse
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
at 2 p. m., and there encamped for the night. May 8, moved forward about four miles; there was some skirmishing, and the enemy were driven through the gap leading to Dalton; remained in camp the rest of the day and night. May 9, remained in position until 2 p. m., when we moved three or four miles to the right, where we pitched our tents and encamped for the night. May 10, remained in camp until evening, when the whole brigade went on picket in the pass. Remained on picket all day of the 11th, and worked all night fortifying. May 12, still on the front line; we had some lively skirmishing. Company C had 1 man killed, and 2 wounded; were relieved at night from picket and commenced fortifying. The morning of the 13th found the enemy gone; the brigade moved out, my regiment in the advance; met with but little resistance until we reached the vicinity of Dalton. My regiment forming the left of the advance, we charged the enemy about 12 m., who were posted on a hill, with two pieces
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
th of June I was ordered by you to cover with my brigade the movement of the corps hospitals, and in compliance bivouacked that night near Brown's Mill creek. On the 8th, the movement of the hospitals being completed, my command joined the division at Allatoona Creek, near Acworth, bringing in 8 prisoners. One of them, a cavalry scout, well mounted and armed, was captured by the commissary sergeant of the Eighty-eighth Illinois, while he (the sergeant) was bathing, naked and unarmed. On the 11th I was placed in reserve, and moved with my command to a point about three and a half miles west, northwest from Kenesaw Mountain, and so remained the 12th and 13th, each day in line of battle, to support the Second Brigade, should it become necessary. On the 14th our line advanced about a mile toward the enemy's works, his sharpshooters skirmishing and falling back. On the 15th the enemy's skirmish line was strengthened and strongly resisted farther advance, but was finally driven back anot
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 45 (search)
in moved on. Met the enemy again on the 25th of May near Dallas. During the stay of our army before Dallas my regiment was almost daily more or less engaged with the enemy. Companies F, G, and I, especially, suffered severely on the 27th, a new skirmish line being established on that day, and said companies being out as skirmishers. On 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th of June we guarded, with the rest of our brigade, the hospital of our corps. Joined the army again on the 9th of June. Moved on the 11th. Were again engaged June 27 near Kenesaw Mountain. My regiment, which had been relieved at 5 o'clock in the morning from picket, was posted on the left of the second line of our brigade. We moved in close column by division right in front. A terrible artillery fire and musketry received us as soon as we came outside of our breast-works and crossing an open field. When we came to a halt I deployed my regiment and covered our left flank, in which position I remained until I received orders
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
nstantly engaged in heavy skirmishing and sham attacks. The enemy having evacuated the position at New Hope, we moved on the 6th to within two miles of Acworth and camped, remaining until the morning of the 10th, when the brigade moved with the division in the direction of Lost Mountain, and after halting through the afternoon, formed on the right of the Fourteenth Corps and fortified. The Twenty-second Illinois Infantry left for the rear to-day to be mustered out of service. On the 11th instant we moved two miles to the left and formed on the right of Baird's division, Fourteenth Corps, and fortified, and the 12th, 13th, and 14th were passed in skirmishing. On the 15th we marched at 8 a. m., and halted some hours near Pine Mountain. At 2 p. m. formed with the division in column of attack, expecting to assault the enemy's works, some distance in front. I was ordered by General Newton to form a strong skirmish line, advance, and develop the enemy's line. The Forty-second Illin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
line having been established along the northern slope of the ridge, the left rested on the crest of the same and connected with General Hazen's (Second) brigade on the right. It being impossible on account of the peculiar formation of the ridge, as before stated, to carry the same by assault, this position was maintained, we simply engaging the enemy on the crest of the ridge with our skirmishers, with no particular movements of the troops from their first position, until the evening of the 11th, when, leaving the Forty-ninth Ohio on the skirmish line, the brigade was moved with the division to the left about one mile and a half, and put into position on the left of General Newton's (Second) division, to meet a reported movement of the enemy in force in that direction, where we remained until the morning of the 12th, when it was found the enemy had the night before evacuated his position in and about Rocky Face Ridge and Dalton. The casualties at this point were: Killed, 5; wounded,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 63 (search)
the enemy rolled stones down on our men, injuring some severely. Our left rested on the top of the ridge, connecting with the pickets of General Harker's brigade. We remained on picket until night, being relieved by the Thirty-second Indiana Volunteers, and returned to our position in the brigade. Our casualties this day were Lieut. Edwin Haff and 5 men wounded, all in Companies F and I, the former commanded byCapt. John F. Kessler, the latter by Capt. M. E. Tyler. On the morning of the 11th, when the division took up position on the hill across the valley in rear of the position held on the 10th, we moved with the brigade. On the evening of the 12th we again relieved the Fifteenth Ohio Volunteers on the line. During this night the enemy evacuated the ridge and retreated from Dalton. On finding them gone a skirmish line was thrown forward and 5 stragglers taken in. On the morning of the 13th the regiment with the brigade marched with the pursuing column and took position in fr
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 76 (search)
, who was trying to gain possession of the north end of the ridge. Bivouacked at night at the foot of ridge. The operations of the 9th were very similar to those of the previous day, consisting of demonstrations, but were attended with the loss of 2 men, struck by balls fired from the ridge. Bivouacked on the same ground we occupied the previous night. During the 10th we lay still in camp, exposed to a sharp fire from the enemy's sharpshooters, by which I man was mortally wounded. On the 11th moved back to a ridge beyond the range of the enemy's small-arms, and lay all day. Went on picket at dark, relieving Seventy-ninth Indiana,where we remained until 8 o'clock on the night of the 12th, when we were relieved by the Seventeenth Kentucky, and joined brigade, which had moved to a point near the north end of the ridge. Had 1 man killed on picket. The morning of the 13th showing the enemy had evacuated, we moved around the northern point of the ridge, passing down the, valley on the
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