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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 6 6 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 6 6 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 6 6 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 6 6 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 25 (search)
right, where we in turn relieved a portion of Hooker's corps. On the 23d we advanced our line, driving the enemy, with some loss, and gained an important position, which we intrenched and held. The regiment was not again actively engaged with the enemy until after crossing the Chattahoochee, though under fire nearly every day until we reached the river. July 18, we bivouacked at Buck Head and moved forward the next day toward Atlanta, encountering the enemy's skirmishers at night. On the 20th we again advanced, and after crossing Peach Tree Creek formed in line of battle. This regiment was held in support of the Twenty-first Kentucky, which was deployed as skirmishers. When in the afternoon a vigorous assault was made upon the skirmish line, and the right of the Twenty-third Corps, which connected with us, gave way, this regiment was moved up to re-enforce the skirmish line, and there fortified. Our loss was but slight. On the 22d of July we advanced to within two miles of Atl
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
ment was entirely without support, the troops of the Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, having marched to the rear on the Atlanta road. Company A, commanded by Captain Parker, was placed on picket on this road, and discovered the enemy in force on the south bank of Peach Tree Creek, making works. A few shots were exchanged, but no attempt to advance was made until the balance of the Third Brigade joined us. The whole command then crossed the creek, formed line, and make good works. On the 20th the Eighth Kansas Volunteers take our place; we move to the left, take position in second line; have 1 man killed. On July 21 change position; 1 man of the picket company is wounded. At 3 a. m. July 22 aroused for move. At daylight pass through the enemy's works. After a short march come within sight of the city of Atlanta. A company of skirmishers, commanded [by] Lieut. P. S. Bannister, Company C, moved forward and drive the enemy into his works. Sergt. Martin L. Johnson, Company I, wa
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
. August 17, lines were extended to the left; the right did not move. A foraging party went out from the regiment and 2 of its members were captured. August 18, the enemy opened very briskly with siege guns and continued for nearly an hour. Our regiment went to the outer works and remained until dark. Received orders at midnight to move at early daylight to the front, but did not move. August 19, at midnight received orders to march to the left on a reconnaissance. At 3.30 a. m. of the 20th moved as ordered, our regiment in the advance. Found the rebels quite numerous three miles from camp, skirmished with them nearly two hours, and drove them one-half mile. Casualties in our regiment were Major Carter slightly and 2 privates of Company B mortally [wounded]. All was quiet during the rest of the day. August 21, 22, 23, and 24, all quiet except some cannonading in our front. August 25, marched nearly all night to the right; met with no resistance. August 26, marched nearly all
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
in front of the west end of Kenesaw Mountain, and bivouacked near Noyes' Creek, which position was acquired after severe skirmishing. On the 19th my command was advanced across Noyes' Creek, driving the enemy before them, and capturing 40 prisoners. The Thirty-sixth Illinoig, under Col. S. Miller, and the Eighty-eighth Illinois Infantry, Colonel Chandler, formed my skirmish line, and were for a short time hotly engaged. My loss in this affair was 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 6 missing. On the 20th the brigade was relieved by a brigade from the Fourteenth Army Corps, and withdrawn across the creek. On the 21st the brigade, as the right of your division, was moved toward our right until it connected with Butterfield's division, of the Twentieth Army Corps, and at 4 p. m. was advanced to a ridge about 600 yards from the enemy's works, when fortifications were thrown up quickly, under a constant fire from his skirmishers and main lines. From the 5th to the 22d of June there was heavy ra
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 49 (search)
arrival made a charge upon the enemy's works. During the charge the regiment was under a brisk fire of musketry, but met with a loss of only 2 men wounded. On the 10th commenced moving slowly upon the enemy, and on the 14th and 15th had engagements with him near Resaca. Had 1 man mortally wounded. On the 16th moved forward, and found the enemy at Adairsville on the 17th, and had an engagement with him. Loss, 13 wounded, 2 mortally. Moved on from Adairsville and arrived at Kingston on the 20th; encamped at the latter place until the 23d. After leaving Kingston we found the enemy in force near Dallas on the 25th. Commenced skirmishing on the 26th, continuing it more or less until the 5th of June. Losses near Dallas were Lieutenant Platt, Company G, killed; Lieutenant Renick, Company F, wounded, and 5 enlisted men wounded. June 6, arrived at Acworth and remained there until the 10th. Kept maneuvering and skirmishing from that date almost continually until the 15th, and drove the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
19, marched at 7 a. m. and reached Kingston at noon. Halted two hours, when we marched out and formed line of battle on a range of hills looking south. Moved from here about 4 p. m. and formed about two miles from town, where we camped. On the 20th we moved back to the mill on Movine Creek and camped, remaining here until 1 p. m. of the 23d, when we marched south, crossing the Etowah at dark, and camping about six miles south of the river late in the night. May 24, marched seven miles and cand had heavy skirmishing all'day. June 19, advanced at 8 a. m., the enemy having left his works; formed line of battle about one mile out, and changed position from one to another until 3 p. m., when we formed in front of Little Kenesaw. On the 20th we adjusted our lines and fortified; had heavy skirmishing all day, and suffered from the fire of the enemy's batteries; at dark were relieved by Carlin's brigade, Fourteenth Corps, and retired about a mile to the rear, where we bivouacked. June
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 51 (search)
bridges burned. On the 9th we marched with the brigade and division to Roswell, a small manufacturing town, sixteen miles up the river, and there we forded the river and camped and threw up works about one mile south of the river; were relieved on the 11th and recrossed the river, and the 12th marched back to our camp at Vining's Station. On the 13th we crossed the river and bivouacked until the 18th, when there was another general movement upon the enemy, driving him, of course. On the 20th we crossed Peach Tree Creek and had gone but a short distance before the enemy came down upon us like a thunderbolt, and attacking while we were unprepared and trying to take a little rest; they made several unsuccessful assaults upon us. The Forty-second was stationed in several different positions during the fight, but at no time had they any works to fight behind with the exception of an occasional tree that had been felled for the purpose of building works. Our loss, however, was very sl
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 52 (search)
cers and 39 men. The losses from the 15th to this time were 11 men killed and wounded. The enemy left this line on the night of the 2d of July, and we marched to the Chattahoochee without further hinderance than a show of resistance on the 4th. On the 10th marched to Roswell, eighteen miles up the river, and crossed, returning to our position in the corps on the 13th, and again crossed the river on the 14th, and rested three days. Marched on the 18th in support of the skirmish line. On the 20th supported and reenforced the Eighty-eighth Illinois, First Brigade. Afterward formed line, facing to the rear, and built breast-works. Casualties, 5 wounded. On the 22d confronted the enemy in their fortifications around Atlanta, where we remained until the night of the 25th, when we started on a raid, which resulted in the evacuation of Atlanta, on the night of the 1st of September. In the skirmish near Jonesborough on the 1st lost 2 men wounded, and on the 2d near Lovejoy's, 3 men wounde
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
lored ground. The Seventeenth Kentucky was deployed as skirmishers to cover the advance of its brigade, and suffered quite severely in the advance late in the afternoon, more than 20 casualties in the skirmish line bearing unmistakable evidence of the sharp fire to which it had been exposed. During the night of the 19th the enemy evacuated his works in the vicinity of Cassville, being the fourth intrenched position abandoned, and retired across the Etowah. Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, the 20th, 21st, and 22d of May, the troops rested quietly in camp, but it was a busy period for commanding generals and staff officers preparing for the grand flank movement for turning the enemy's position at the railway gap in the Allatoona Hills. Taking twenty days subsistence in wagons, the entire army defiantly cut loose from its line of communication, crossed the Etowah River, and pushed boldly southward through a most abrupt and difficult range of hills. The movement was commenced on Monday,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
sition was within one and three-fourths of a mile of the courthouse in Atlanta, and about 800 yards of the enemy's fortifications, consisting of detached field-works for artillery, without any connecting curtains, and which were apparently not held in strong force by him, he having massed his troops on his right, where, in the afternoon, near the Decatur road, he attacked our left wing, consisting of the Army of the Tennessee, under General McPherson, meeting with greater disaster than on the 20th, when he attempted to break our center. About 10 a. m., this brigade being relieved by the division of General Newton (who established and fortified our vacated line and occupied it during the subsequent operations of our troops before Atlanta), we moved to the left and rear and massed in the rear of Knefler's brigade, who at that time joined the left of Newton's division. At 2 p. m. we moved forward and to the right and relieved the first brigade of General Newton, on the crest of a ridge
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