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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
n reserve. I was not engaged this day, but from the changes of position demanded by the varying circumstances of the day, my men became greatly fatigued. At length, toward night-fall, I was ordered to form on the left of General Stanley, connecting with the Twentieth Corps, only a portion of General Stanley's division being able to find a place in the line. I went into camp for the night just in the rear of the line. May 20, the enemy retreated during the night previous, and this day, the 21st, and 22d were devoted to refitting the troops. Monday, 23d, started at 1 p. m. and proceeded by way of Saltpetre Cave to Gillem's Bridge, where we crossed the Etowah, third in order of march. Advanced three miles beyond the river and encamped at 11 p. m. May 24, marched to Burnt Hickory, second in order of march. May 25, took the road toward New Hope Church, crossing the bridge over Pumpkin Vine Creek, in rear of Williams' division, Twentieth Corps, my division leading the Fourth Corps. A
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
d my skirmish line, and were for a short time hotly engaged. My loss in this affair was 3 killed, 15 wounded, and 6 missing. On the 20th the brigade was relieved by a brigade from the Fourteenth Army Corps, and withdrawn across the creek. On the 21st the brigade, as the right of your division, was moved toward our right until it connected with Butterfield's division, of the Twentieth Army Corps, and at 4 p. m. was advanced to a ridge about 600 yards from the enemy's works, when fortificationsng. Compared with the fury of the enemy's charges, his superior numbers, and his great losses, my own casualties were remarkably small, the total loss in the brigade being 3 killed and 31 wounded. The works were strengthened during the day of the 21st, and on the morning of the 22d our skirmishers entered the enemy's works, he having evacuated them during the night. At 9 o'clock the 22d the command moved out toward Atlanta. The enemy's pickets were encountered at a point two miles from the ci
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 46 (search)
ee River. Remained in this position with a slight change of camp until the 13th, on which day we crossed the Chattahoochee River and went into camp, where we remained until the 18th. On the night of the 19th crossed Peach Tree Creek and took position near where the battle was fought the next day. The engagement of the 20th was a very brilliant affair, the enemy advancing on our works, which were very hastily constructed, and were each time repulsed and driven back in great disorder. On the 21st I remained quiet all day, and on the 22d the enemy retired; we immediately pursued and got into position in the vicinity of Atlanta. Threw up works; remained here with a slight change of position until the 25th of August, on the night of which we retired from our position and marched toward the right; continued the march without anything of any moment occurring until the 1st of September, when we struck the Macon railroad, spent most of the day in destroying the road. Toward evening the fir
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 48 (search)
which I commanded a view of the main line of works of the enemy. About 12 m. my regiment was relieved from the front line, and remained in reserve until nearly night-fall, when we were returned to the front. In this engagement Lieutenant Beitzell, of Company C, one of the most efficient officers of the command, fell. On the morning of the 19th the enemy was gone from our front and we again engaged in pursuit. They were overtaken near Kenesaw Mountain, where our lines were formed on the 21st, and where works were erected. On the 23d my regiment was placed on picket at early dawn, and I was ordered by Colonel Bartleson, officer of the day, at 3 p. m., to advance the line. About one-half of my regiment was in reserve. I conveyed the order to the officer of the skirmish line, giving them the proper time to move, when the advancement was made in a very satisfactory manner. As soon as the front line had left the pits I took the reserve to them, and at what I thought a proper time
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
after dark. May 18, marched at 9 a. m. one mile to Adairsville, rested till 1 p. m., marched three miles toward Kingston, and bivouacked, the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers having captured 4 prisoners during the day. May 19, marched two and a half miles beyond Kingston, encountered the enemy in force, and rested on arms during the night. May 20, went into camp three miles southeast of Kingston, where we were allowed to remain, the men resting, washing clothes, &c., during the 21st and 22d ultimo. As every available team was ordered into the supply train, baggage was sent to the rear and the regiment was restricted to one team during the remainder of the campaign. May 23, marched at 12 m., leaving the enemy to our left, crossed the Etowah River shortly after dusk, and bivouacked two miles farther on at 8 p. m. May 24, moved at 8 a. m., crossed Euharlee Creek at Barrett's Mill, passed through Stilesborough, and bivouacked at dusk, after a march of thirteen miles under
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
upying the interval referred to, consequently not finding the weak place in our extended lines which he was evidently in search of; on the contrary, he was repulsed with great loss. The enemy having fallen back during the night, at 6 a. m. of the 21st our skirmish line was advanced through the enemy's works and closely followed by the brigade, moving in a southwesterly direction for a distance of about one mile, when the enemy was found strongly intrenched in a position about three-fourths of aout one mile to the right to support Bridges' battery, which had taken a commanding position in an open field and within effective range of the enemy. In this day's operations we took 9 prisoners, but suffered no loss. During the night of the 21st, the enemy having again fallen back, our skirmishers at daylight occupied his works, capturing 9 prisoners, and at 6 a. m. the brigade moved forward without opposition on road, passing through the enemy's works and striking the Peach Tree Creek ro
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 63 (search)
ous. It stood out from the main line of battle, and almost detached from the ridge held by our troops. Upon this knoll we completed some works made in the form of a crescent, and protected our flanks from the cross-fire the enemy were enabled to give us. Remained in this position until evening, being relieved by the Thirty-fifth Illinois and Fifteenth Wisconsin Volunteers, when we returned to our place in the brigade. Our casualties this day were 1 enlisted man killed and 4 wounded. On the 21st I was ordered by Colonel Nodine, commanding brigade, to take my regiment and place it behind a bald knob just captured by the Fifteenth Ohio, as support. In obeying this order, and while advancing over an open field, I received a cross-fire from a wooded eminence to the right of the bald knob, and directly in front of the wooded knob alluded to above. Deeming it necessary to drive the enemy from this position to enable us to hold the one just gained by the four companies of the Fifteenth Oh
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 64 (search)
ks, where we remained until the enemy evacuated his third line in front of Kenesaw Mountain on the night of the 19th. Passing through the third line of the enemy's works at 10 a. m. the 20th, this division relieved a division of the Twentieth Corps, about one and a half miles to the right of Kenesaw Mountain and 500 yards from the enemy's fourth line of works. About 150 yards in the immediate front of this brigade lay Bald Knob, where the enemy was strongly posted behind rifle-pits. On the 21st the brigade was ordered to charge and dislodge the enemy from his position on the knob. At 12 m. the Fifteenth Ohio, deployed as skirmishers, and the Forty-fifth [Forty-ninth] Ohio supporting, charged. and drove the enemy from his position, capturing many prisoners. Our regiment was immediately ordered to relieve the Fifteenth Ohio on the skirmish line, which was effected under a heavy fire from the enemy. We immediately intrenched ourselves on this knob, which we held until the night of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 65 (search)
ank of the enemy to assist the Fourteenth Corps to cross, when we returned to the position of the morning and remained until the 18th, when we marched to Buck Head, taking up a position, and on the 19th moved to Peach Tree Creek, when, after repairing the bridge, the brigade moved over and took up a position for the night, supported by Kimball's brigade. On the 20th we moved by a circuitous route about four miles to the left and took position on the right of Stanley. We fortified it on the 21st, the enemy falling back upon Atlanta during the night, and on the 22d we moved and took up our last position in front of the city. Casualties have been frequent during the last four days. Good works and obstructions were made here, and with the exception of almost daily demonstration with picket-lines and artillery, but little occurred to mention in this report, up to the 17th of August, when I turned the command of the brigade over to Col. O. H. Payne, One hundred and twenty-fourth Ohio,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 72 (search)
the Ninety-third as skirmishers, advanced about two miles, driving in the enemy's skirmish line and establishing our line about 1,000 yards from their works. During the day the Ninety-third sustained a loss of 1 enlisted man killed and 5 wounded. On the night of the 19th the enemy evacuated our front, falling back to their last line in front of Marietta. On the following morning a skirmish line from the One hundred and twenty-fourth was advanced, driving the enemy into their works. On the 21st the battalion was moved to the right, and relieved a battalion of the Twentieth Army Corps. On the 23d the Ninety-third, deployed as skirmishers, charged and drove back the enemy, advancing our lines about 1,000 yards, with a loss to the Ninety-third of 1 officer killed, 2 enlisted men killed, and 37 enlisted men wounded. The battalion was no further engaged, with the exception of constant picket-firing, in which both battalions suffered, the One hundred and twenty-fourth having 1 officer s
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