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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 1 1 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 1 1 Browse Search
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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
ndridge and Mossy Creek December 24-28. Dandridge, Tenn., December 24. Talbot Station December 28. Mossy Creek, Talbot Station, December 29. Bend of Chucky Road, near Dandridge, January 16, 1864. Operations about Dandridge January 16-17. Dandridge January 17. Fair Garden January 27. McNutt's Bridge January 27. Veterans on furlough April-May. Operations against Morgan May 31-June 20. Defence of Frankfort June 10. Duty in District of Kentucky till September. January 17. Fair Garden January 27. McNutt's Bridge January 27. Veterans on furlough April-May. Operations against Morgan May 31-June 20. Defence of Frankfort June 10. Duty in District of Kentucky till September. Lawrenceburg September 6. Readyville, Tenn., September 6, Woodbury September 10. Operations against Hood in North Georgia and North Alabama September 29-November 3. Camp Creek September 30. Sweetwater and Noyes Creek, near Powder Springs, October 1-3. Lafayette, Ga., October 12. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Lovejoy Station November 16. East Macon November 20. Gordon November 21. Clinton November 21-23. Griswoldsville November 22. Sylvan Grove Nove
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Tennessee Volunteers. (search)
ber 27. Talbot Station, Mossy Creek, December 29. Expedition to Cosby Creek, N. C., January, 1864. Cosby Creek January 17. Near Wilsonville January 22. Operations about Dandridge January 26-28. Fair Garden January 26-27. McNutt'seek, Talbot Station, December 29. Bend of Chucky and Rutledge January 16, 1864. Operations about Dandridge January 16-17. Seviersville January 26. Near Fair Garden January 27. Fentress County February 13. Sulphur Springs February 26ember 26. Talbot's Station December 29. Shoal Creek, Ala., January 14, 1864. Operations about Dandridge January 16-17. Kimbrough's Cross Roads January 16. Dandridge January 17. Operations about Dandridge January 26. Fair Garden JJanuary 17. Operations about Dandridge January 26. Fair Garden January 27. Duty at Knoxville and Loudon till August, 1864. Operations against Wheeler in East Tennessee August 15-31. Duty at Knoxville and in East Tennessee till March, 1865. Ordered to Cumberland Gap March 16, and duty there till August
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Wisconsin Volunteers. (search)
Near Mossy Creek January 11-12, 1864. Operations about Dandridge January 16-17. Bend of Chucky Road, near Dandridge, January 16. Dandridge January 17. January 17. Operations about Dandridge January 26-28. Fair Garden January 27. Swann's Island January 28. Expedition from Motley's Ford to Murphey, N. C., February 17-22.s November 25, and duty there till January 17, 1862. Moved to Cairo, Ill., January 17, and duty there till March 4. (Co. K detached at Mound City till April. nuary 10, 1863. Moved to Memphis January 10, thence to Young's Point, La., January 17 and to Lake Providence, La., February 8. Duty there till April. Movemen, 1863. Moved to Memphis, Tenn., January 10, thence to Young's Point, La., January 17, and to Lake Providence March 8. Action at Old River, Lake Providence, Feb, January 3; thence to Memphis, Tenn., January 10, and to Young's Point, La., January 17. Moved to Lake Providence, La., February 8, and duty there till April 20.
was for the North to hold itself immovable. He exhorted every one to stand for the right with unwavering front. He wrote (Jan. 1) to William Claflin, President of the Massachusetts Senate, Let the timid cry; but let Massachusetts stand stiff: God bless her! To Count Gurowski, author of an admirable treatise on slavery, he wrote (Jan. 8), These compromisers do not comprehend the glory of principle. Perissent les colonies plutot qu'un principle! In a letter to Gov. John A. Andrew, dated Jan. 17, he said, Pray keep Massachusetts sound and firm, firm, firm! against every word or step of concession. In another letter to the same, dated Jan. 28, he said, Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes: don't let these words be ever out of your mind when you think of any proposition from the slave-masters. O God! Let Massachusetts keep true. So again he wrote (Feb. 5), More than the loss of forts, arsenals, or the national capital, I fear the loss of our principles; and again (Feb. 10) he wrote to
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Chapter 13: operations about Pocotaligo. (search)
assailed their chosen leaders. The Charleston Mercury said on January 12: Let old things pass away. We want no more Jeff. Davis foolery. . . . North Carolina, Georgia, and South Carolina are in no mood for trifling. . . . South Carolina don't intend to be conquered. She don't intend to be hampered or turned over to the enemy. When she is thus dealt with, there will be reckoning,—a reckoning where there will be no respecter of persons. By orders from the War Department received January 17, Lieutenant Swails was permitted to muster, thus ending a struggle waged in his behalf for nearly a year by Colonel Hallowell and Governor Andrew. He was one of the earliest if not the first colored officer mustered; and this decision, persistently solicited and finally granted, must rank high with the moral victories wrung from the general government by the regiment and its founders. On the 18th the steamer Wyoming landed the first supplies for Sherman's army at our wharf. That day n
this Commonwealth by General Butler. Jan. 14. In the Senate.—The bill to give aid to the families of volunteers recruited in this State by General Butler was passed to be engrossed. In the House.—Mr. Roberts, of Lakeville, offered an order, directing the Committee on the Militia to consider the expediency of making certain amendments to the State-aid law of 1861. The Senate bill to give aid to families, &c., was passed through its various stages, under a suspension of the rules. Jan. 17. In the Senate.—On motion of Mr. Northend, of Essex, the Committee on Printing were directed to consider the expediency of printing three thousand extra copies of the Adjutant-General's Report, in addition to those already ordered. In the House.—On motion of Mr. Manning, of Reading, it was ordered, that the Committee on the Militia consider the expediency of amending the militia law, so as to make all the enrolled militia do military duty. Jan. 20. In the House.—On motion of Mr. Pi
enthusiastic and heartfelt. It was a matter of deep interest to look upon the bronzed faces and martial forms of these heroes. Those who had occasion to pass through Boston, on their way to their homes, were cordially received by the State and city authorities, and received a banquet from the city in Faneuil Hall, and were addressed sometimes by the Governor, sometimes by the Adjutant-General, and always by Mr. Lincoln, the Mayor of Boston. The first to arrive reached Boston on the 17th of January; and, the next day, the Governor wrote the following letter to Mayor Lincoln:— I should neglect a most agreeable duty, if I should omit to acknowledge in the most cordial manner the hearty and generous reception which the city government, under your Honor's direction, extended yesterday to the returning veterans, and proposes to continue towards the other veteran corps, as from time to time they pass through Boston, on their furlough, after re-enlistment. The highest compliment
hout the knowledge of General Sargent, and that he is not now aware of its existence. On the 16th of January, Edward Everett, one of the most distinguished citizens of the nation, died in the city of Boston, after a short illness. The sudden death of this illustrious man, whose whole life had reflected honor upon his native State and his country, caused a profound sensation. His speeches during the war kept alive and invigorated the loyal spirit and purpose of the people. On the 17th of January, the Governor telegraphed to Senator Sumner as follows:— Should it be the purpose of the President, or of either of the Cabinet ministers, to honor Boston with their presence on the occasion of Mr. Everett's funeral, to which they have been invited, please telegraph me so that this Department may be suitably notified. On the 18th of January, the Governor received the following telegram from Secretary Seward:— It is impracticable for the President and the Cabinet to leav
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
ed, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to volunteers for nine months service. October 15th, The selectmen were directed to continue the payment of State aid to the families of deceased volunteers the same as was paid when the soldiers were living. November 4th, The selectmen were directed to pay volunteers for nine months, who went into camp, but who were not required to fill the quota of the town, each the sum of twenty-five dollars for their lost time and other expenses. 1863. January 17th, The selectmen were directed to pay nine hundred dollars to volunteers who have entered the military service as substitutes to relieve the town from a draft. April 6th, The selectmen were authorized to continue the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers. 1864. April 29th, Four thousand two hundred and fifty dollars were raised to procure a portion of the quota of the town from the Commonwealth. June 4th, The selectmen were directed to enlist twenty men as soon as possible,
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
war was Albert Nichols. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town in its corporate capacity during this year in relation to the war. 1862. At a special town-meeting held on the 5th of August, it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who would enlist either for three years or nine months, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. 1863. At a meeting held on the 17th of January, Samuel House, one of the selectmen, was appointed to visit Boston and obtain information in regard to the number of men the town was to furnish to complete its quota. 1864. On the 2d of April the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist and be credited to the town; also to raise eight hundred and seventy-five dollars to repay citizens money which they had advanced for recruiting purposes. This bounty was continued to be pa
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