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Cook's brigade, which lost no men. Our line to-night is about one mile south of Tunnel Hill, and within three miles of the celebrated Buzzard Roost, near which the Fourteenth corps had the spirited engagement on the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh of February last. Our line extends from Rocky Face Ridge to (report says) the left of General Hooker, who has come up on the enemy's left flank. A large force of cavalry is under General Kilpatrick, scouring the country on our extreme right. Torward, and the whole line simultaneously pressed forward and at the close of the skirmishing, at sundown, occupied a position about one mile in the rear of the gaps in which Palmer fought the enemy so stubbornly on the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh of February. Brigadier-General Wood's skirmishers were engaged during the day on the left of Stanley extending to the base of Rocky Face. The day has not brought on a regular engagement, though it has witnessed the repulse of a gallant charge
in Stanley's division of the Fourth corps engaged, were commanded by Generals Whitaker and Cruft, and Colonel Gross, and those of the Fourteenth corps by General Morgan and Colonels McCook and Mitchell. The principal skirmishing was performed by McCook's brigade, which lost no men. Our line to-night is about one mile south of Tunnel Hill, and within three miles of the celebrated Buzzard Roost, near which the Fourteenth corps had the spirited engagement on the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh of February last. Our line extends from Rocky Face Ridge to (report says) the left of General Hooker, who has come up on the enemy's left flank. A large force of cavalry is under General Kilpatrick, scouring the country on our extreme right. To-day, while Barnett's Illinois battery was playing upon the rebels, who responded vigorously, a shell struck the ground and exploded within three feet of Brigadier-General Davis and Captain Barnett. The General had a narrow escape from death, but h
xcellent order across the open fields, the enemy retreating from behind their barricades at their approach, and seeking safety in flight. Halting for a brief moment, and seeking protection behind the rebel barricade, the Thirty-first again moved forward, and the whole line simultaneously pressed forward and at the close of the skirmishing, at sundown, occupied a position about one mile in the rear of the gaps in which Palmer fought the enemy so stubbornly on the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh of February. Brigadier-General Wood's skirmishers were engaged during the day on the left of Stanley extending to the base of Rocky Face. The day has not brought on a regular engagement, though it has witnessed the repulse of a gallant charge made by two brigades of Geary's division of Hooker's corps. As I have already said, Schofield's corps is working east of the rebel positions, while Hooker's bears south-west of Dalton, and McPherson, with a large army, is aiming at Resacca, in th
ct the attention of all the force the enemy could collect, and facilitate the execution of this. General Stoneman was so late in making his start on this expedition (and Sherman having passed out of the State of South Carolina), on the twenty-seventh of February I directed General Thomas to change his course, and ordered him to repeat his raid of last fall, destroying the railroad toward Lynchburg as far as he could. This would keep him between our garrisons in East Tennessee and the enemy. Ily posted at one or the other of these places, with railroad communications opened from his army to Wilmington or Newbern. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Major-General P. H. Sheridan. General Sheridan moved from Winchester on the twenty-seventh of February, with two divisions of cavalry, numbering about five thousand each. On the first of March he secured the bridge which the enemy attempted to destroy, across the middle fork of the Shenandoah, at Mount Crawford, and entered Staunton on
Doc. 110. Major-General Sheridan's report. Headquarters military division of the South-West, New Orleans, Louisiana, July 16, 1865. General — I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of my command in the campaign from Winchester, in the Shenandoah valley, to the armies in front of Petersburg, beginning February twenty-seventh, and ending March twenty-eighth. The command consisted of the First and Third divisions of cavalry, of the Army of the Shenandoah, under the immediate command of Brevet Major-General Wesley Merritt, Brevet Major-General George A. Custer commanding the Third division, and Brigadier-General T. C. Devin, the first. The following was the effective force: Effective Force First and Third Cavalry Divisions, Army of the Shenandoah, February Twenty-eighth, 1865--Major-General Wesley Merritt, Chief of Cavalry.   commissioned officers. enlisted men. First cavalry division, Brigadier-General T. C. Devin, commanding 260 4,787 On