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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11., Ye olde Meting-House of Meadford. (search)
table, and rested upon the two turned posts that J. Whitmore made. Furthermore, the same committee was directed to consider what they think most proper to be done in their meting-house for better accommodation . . . more convenient room by a table, pews or galleries, and report at the next town meeting. So on May 12 the town voted to go on to finish a front gallery on the beams of the meeting-house, with stairs convenient for the same. When the deacons were chosen by the church, on March 1, it was decided to celebrate the Holy Sacrament of the Lord's Supper on the 22d, and every sixth week thereafter, so the table needed to be provided, and this was to reach so far as the door of the little pue under the pulpit. After this three pews were built next the front wall between the doors, but there was no alley before them, as the house was becoming too small. Deacon Bradshaw had the one on the right of the men's door, and Madam Porter (the minister's wife) the one on the left
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11., Ye olde Meting-House of Meadford. (search)
ing-house Omitted getting down before. The receipts are entered on the right hand pages of the book, and the page being one of the earliest used, the right, or outer edge, is so frayed and worn that the amount paid by Mr. Willis is missing. An interesting matter in this connection is the date January 4, 729. As the town directed the selectmen on September 29, 1729, to sell it and Mr. Willis paid for it on January 4, it was in the eleventh month of the year, which then began with the first of March, instead of January. Another incident is that the entry is not in regular order, but is explained by the written note, Omitted setting down before. Such are the facts gleaned from the ancient records of the town, their time-worn and discolored pages now carefully preserved between silk tissue. In a careful reading of them, often requiring patient study, and diligent comparison of the quaint expression, and almost phonetic spelling, the writer felt as one becoming introduced to th