Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for March 25th or search for March 25th in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 49: letters to Europe.—test oath in the senate.—final repeal of the fugitive-slave act.—abolition of the coastwise slave-trade.—Freedmen's Bureau.—equal rights of the colored people as witnesses and passengers.—equal pay of colored troops.—first struggle for suffrage of the colored people.—thirteenth amendment of the constitution.— French spoliation claims.—taxation of national banks.— differences with Fessenden.—Civil service Reform.—Lincoln's re-election.—parting with friends.—1863-1864. (search)
ge of passengers. The amendment passed by only one majority, several of the Republican senators—Anthony, Howe, and Lane among them—voting against it. Feb. 27, 1863. Congressional Globe, p. 1328. It was concurred in by the House, and became part of the Act of March 3, 1863. At the session now under review, he carried the same amendment to two charters, succeeding after spirited contests by a small majority in each case,—defeated at one stage and prevailing at a later one. Feb. 10, 25, March 16, 17, June 21, 1864; Works, vol. VIII. pp. 103-117. The amendment was rejected, June 21, by fourteen to sixteen,—Foster, Grimes, Sherman, and Trumbull voting nay; but moved again by Sumner on the same day, it passed by a vote of seventeen to sixteen. The opposition of Saulsbury, Powell, and Willey abounded in ribaldry. Republican senators—Trumbull, Sherman, Doolittle, and Grimes, as well as Reverdy Johnson—contended that an express prohibition was superfluous, as the exclusion was
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, chapter 10 (search)
d States in 1812 in the war with Great Britain. The claim was historically connected with Governor Strong's refusal to comply with President Madison's call for the State militia. Maine, as a part of Massachusetts in 1812, was entitled to a share in the amount to be recovered; and Massachusetts had in advance appropriated her own share to the aid of the European and North American Railway, in which Maine was greatly interested. Sumner took the lead in supporting the claim, Feb. 24 and 25, March 1, 2, and 3. Congressional Globe, pp. 1518, 1519, 1579, 1585, 1718-1722, 1732-1734, 1840, 1854. and slowed to good advantage his capacity for a running debate, which would have been always conceded but for his too great proneness to prepare himself with elaborate speeches. C. W. Slack in the Boston Commonwealth, March 6, 1869. The debate brought together in pleasant relations Sumner and Fessenden in their encounter with the Western senators, who were led by Sherman and supported by Fre
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 55: Fessenden's death.—the public debt.—reduction of postage.— Mrs. Lincoln's pension.—end of reconstruction.—race discriminations in naturalization.—the Chinese.—the senator's record.—the Cuban Civil War.—annexation of San Domingo.—the treaties.—their use of the navy.—interview with the presedent.—opposition to the annexation; its defeat.—Mr. Fish.—removal of Motley.—lecture on Franco-Prussian War.—1869-1870. (search)
of the speech as given by correspondents were as follows: New York Herald, March 25. 26, 28, 31. New York Times, March 25. New York Tribune, March 25. New York WoMarch 25. New York Tribune, March 25. New York World, March 25. Boston Advertiser, March 26. Boston Journal, March 28. Chicago Republican, March 25. The correspondent of the New York Times, March 14, stated the senMarch 25. New York World, March 25. Boston Advertiser, March 26. Boston Journal, March 28. Chicago Republican, March 25. The correspondent of the New York Times, March 14, stated the senator's expected opposition to the annexation on grounds like those he took in the debate.. 1. The proposed annexation likely to encourage further acquisitions in theMarch 25. Boston Advertiser, March 26. Boston Journal, March 28. Chicago Republican, March 25. The correspondent of the New York Times, March 14, stated the senator's expected opposition to the annexation on grounds like those he took in the debate.. 1. The proposed annexation likely to encourage further acquisitions in the same direction, bringing to the United States a population difficult to assimilate, involving large expense and complications with other powers, particularly with HaMarch 25. The correspondent of the New York Times, March 14, stated the senator's expected opposition to the annexation on grounds like those he took in the debate.. 1. The proposed annexation likely to encourage further acquisitions in the same direction, bringing to the United States a population difficult to assimilate, involving large expense and complications with other powers, particularly with Hayti, which asserted claims against San Domingo. 2. The half island not heretofore tempting to, and not likely to tempt, European powers. 3. The uncertainty as to the equatorial belt, and he should enjoy it undisturbed. Caleb Cushing wrote, March 25:— You must be gratified to find that all the journals commend your speec