Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for April 12th or search for April 12th in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
vingston by inquiring whether the United States desired the whole of Louisiana, and what price they were willing to pay for it. Mr. Livingston says (Letter of Livingston to Madison, Annals of Congress, 1802-3, p. 1126): I told him no; that our wishes extended only to New Orleans and the Floridas; that the policy of France should dictate to give us the country above the river Arkansas, in order to place a barrier between them and Canada. Mr. Monroe, who had sailed March 8th, reached Paris April 12th, the day after Napoleon's conference with Marbois, and at once entered into conference with Mr. Livingston. On the night of the 12th, Marbois made to Livingston the informal overtures, as directed by Napoleon. (Annals of Congress, 1802-3, pp. 1128-9, 30, 31, 32.) Mr. Livingston details the interview in a letter to Mr. Madison. He received the overtures with caution and took occasion to repeat the assurance which he had frequently given: I told him the United States were anxious to pr
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
servant and intelligent actor in the events of the time, Mr. John Sherman, who says in his Recollections, page 442, The period between the 4th of March and the 12th of April was the darkest in the history of the United States. It was a time of humiliation, timidity and feebleness. Rumors were getting abroad that the administratio But the disadvantages were too great to be overcome and in a few weeks Baltimore was held by the Federal army. President Davis issued a proclamation on the 12th of April previously to the fight for Fort Sumter, convening the Congress on the 29th, prompted by the declaration of hostilities contained in the message sent by Presid communication between Charleston and Montgomery, which resulted in the defeat of the hostile descent, and thus the immergent proclamation by President Davis of April 12th to assemble the Confederate Congress, antedated the call of President Lincoln on the States for 75,000 volunteers. The Confederate government now saw that the