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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 2 2 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
, like Dupont's at Port Royal Entrance, and throwing heavy shot and shell upon the fortress. But the roughness of the sea, caused by a southwest wind, compelled them to withdraw after fighting an hour and a quarter. The land batteries kept at work until four o'clock in the afternoon, when a white flag, displayed on Fort Macon, caused their firing to cease. Captain Guion, of the garrison, came out with a proposition from Colonel White to surrender; and before ten o'clock the next morning April 26. the fort was in the possession of the National forces, with about five hundred prisoners of war. The capitulation was signed by Colonel M. T. White, General J. G. Parke, and Commodore Samuel Lockwood. The troops of the garrison were held as prisoners of war on parole until duly exchanged. The officers were allowed to retain their side-arms; and both officers and men had the privilege of saving their private effects. In this conflict the Nationals lost only one man killed and two woun
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 4: campaign of the Army of the Cumberland from Murfreesboro'to Chattanooga. (search)
r Colonel Minty, moved from Murfreesboroa April 20, 1863. upon McMinnville, then occupied by about seven hundred of Morgan's men. The guerrilla's troopers were driven out and dispersed, and a Confederate wagon-train, which had just left for Chattanooga, was pursued, and some of the wagons were destroyed. The Nationals burned a Confederate cotton factory and other public property at McMinnville, destroyed the railway, its buildings, trestle-work, and bridges, and returned to Murfreesboroa April 26. without accident, their triumph graced by one hundred and thirty captives. Other smaller expeditions were sent out at about this time, and the Confederate raiders were taught to be very circumspect. Toward the middle of April, a more ambitious expedition than any yet sent out by Rosecrans, started from Nashville, upon the important service of sweeping around to the rear of Bragg's army, cutting all the railways in Northern Georgia, destroying depots of supplies, manufactories of arms a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
of the stores were sent away in steamboats, and when Marmaduke appeared and demanded a surrender of the place, giving McNeil only thirty minutes to consider an answer, the latter was well prepared to fight, and told the Confederate leader so. Early the next morning Marmaduke shelled his adversary for awhile, and then again demanded a surrender. McNeil answered with his guns, when the assailant, seeing some armed vessels in the Mississippi coming to the aid of the besieged, beat a retreat April 26. across the St. Francis River, and hurried on toward Arkansas, burning the bridges behind him. McNeil was now ranked by General Vandever, who was of a different temperament, and the pursuit was made so cautiously under his orders, that Marmaduke escaped, after his rear-guard had skirmished several times with McNeil's pursuing column. Marmaduke took with him his fourteen pieces of artillery, and full as many prisoners as had been taken from him. His loss in killed and wounded was much gre
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
ed before a rise in the river, and finding delay to be very dangerous, on account of the gathering of the Confederates on the shores of the stream, Porter ordered her to be blown up. The explosion and ensuing fire made her destruction complete. April 26. At the same time,. more than a thousand Confederates had gathered near, and taking advantage of the situation, rushed to the right bank of the river to board the Cricket, Master H. H. Goninge, lying there. She moved out, and gave them such a s Steele now felt it necessary to retreat to Little Rock, for he was informed that Fagan was marching on that place, and that E. Kirby Smith had heavily re-enforced Price. He accordingly threw his army across the Washita on the night of the 26th of April, and at daylight the next morning began a retreat by way of Princeton and Jenkinson's Ferry, on the Sabine River. At the latter place he was attacked April 30. by an overwhelming force, led by Kirby Smith in person. Steele's troops were ne
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
ttering this great army, it had been directed at once upon Turcoing, there could have been united in it a hundred battalions and a hundred and forty squadrons. What would have been the result then of the famous diversion of Pichegru, cut off from his frontiers, and shut up between the North Sea and two hostile fortresses? The plan of invasion of the French, had not only the radical defect of all exterior lines, it was faulty also in execution; the diversion on Courtrai took place the 26th of April, and Jourdan only arrived at Charleroi the 3d of June, more than a month afterwards. What a fine occasion for the Austrians to profit from their central position! I think, that had the Prussian army manoeuvered by its right, and the Austrian army by its left, that is to say, both upon the Meuse, affairs would have taken a very different turn; in fact, establishing themselves upon the centre of a disseminated line, their mass would certainly have prevented the union of its several parts
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
e of our brave crew, and also had ten wounded. The guns were well worked and served, and when officers and men behave with such courage and coolness, I consider it a credit to the ship to say that it is impossible for me to individualize. On April 26th, at 3.25 p. m., proceeded up the river to attack some batteries; at 5 went to quarters, and at 5.35 discovered two batteries, both of which, however, had been evacuated, and gun-carriages set on fire. Sent a boat to battery on left bank and spat Isle au Breton, and to send an officer with him in the Saxon to pilot his vessel through Pass a l'outre. Mr. Oltmanns also came back from his boat expedition in the rear of Fort Jackson, having been within one mile and a half of the fort. April 26.--In the morning, Captain Boggs, of the Varuna steam gun-boat, came on board to go with me to General Butler's ship; he had lost his vessel during the passage of the fleet past the forts on the 24th, being run into from two different quarters by
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
iendship and your fairness whether this diagram gives the faintest idea of the action, and whether if the names of the vessels were altered, it would not apply equally well or better to many other battles. As an evidence how far the Cayuga was ahead of the rest of the fleet the first news received at the North is announced in the New York Times of Sunday, April 27, 1862, thus: An important report from the rebels.--One of our gun-boats above Fort Jackson and San Philip. Washington, Saturday April 26th. The Richmond Examiner of the 25th, announces that one of our gun-boats passed Fort San Philip, sixty miles below New Orleans on the 24th. The report was telegraphed to Norfolk, and brought to Fortress Monroe under a flag of truce, and received from there to-day by the Navy Department. The next rebel telegram announced the arrival of the fleet before the city. The Cayuga in the interval had captured the Chalmette regiment, five miles above the forts, and cut the telegraphic comm
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
es had joined General Price, and the combined forces were marching upon Steele's position. Under all the circumstances, with no hope of being joined by Banks, General Steele wisely concluded to evacuate Camden and fall back. On the night of April 26th the army crossed the Washita and marched towards Little Rock, by way of Princeton and Jenkins' Ferry, on the Sabine. On the 27th, a pontoon bridge was thrown across the Sabine at the latter point, and the army reached Little Rock, and it was l and which were so little known that there was small hope of saving the iron-clad without some help from the Army, which would probably not be given. It would be impossible to convey an adequate idea of the proceedings from the 21st to the 26th of April, during which time the efforts of Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, and the officers and men of that little squadron, were devoted to the saving of this valuable iron-clad. Phelps and his command worked day and night, almost without rest, in th
ame day at 8 p. m. April 15, the brigade, except guard for baggage train, was moved to Tuscumbia, Ala., arriving there April 16, at 11 p. m. At 12 noon, April 24, the brigade fell back from Tuscumbia to Decatur, arriving there at 8 p. m. April 26. April 26 and 27, the brigade, except the Eighteenth Ohio, fell back to Huntsville, Ala., the Eighteenth Ohio going to Athens. The Ninth Brigade left Murfreesborough, Tenn., April 4, and marched thence, via Shelbyville and Fayetteville, April 26 and 27, the brigade, except the Eighteenth Ohio, fell back to Huntsville, Ala., the Eighteenth Ohio going to Athens. The Ninth Brigade left Murfreesborough, Tenn., April 4, and marched thence, via Shelbyville and Fayetteville, to Camp Taylor Huntsville, Ala., arriving April 11; since which time the brigade has been divided and sent in different directions on the line of the railroad. The Eighteenth Wisconsin Regiment now being at Bellefonte, the Second Ohio on provost duty at Huntsville, the Twenty-first Ohio at Athens, and two companies of the Thirty-third Ohio now in camp, the balance guarding the water-tanks, bridges, &c., on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. The Seventeenth Brigade left Murfreesborough Apr
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
Illinois Volunteers, Tenth and Fourteenth Michigan Volunteers Yates Sharpshooters, and Hescock's battery, under the command 00 Col. James D. Morgan, Tenth Regiment Illinois Volunteers. April 25.-This morning the Tenth and Sixteenth Illinois Volunteers, Yates Sharpshooters, and Houghtaling's battery were ordered forward about 1½ miles to a commanding position as an advance post. The balance of the division remained in the old camp. The Fourteenth Michigan reported for duty to-day. April 26.-Remained in camp. April 27.-Advanced some 4 miles, the whole command following. Houghtaling's battery assigned to the Second Brigade and Hescock's to the First Brigade. April 28.-Remained in camp. April 29.-Part of both brigades were ordered forward on the Monterey road some 4 miles, as a supporting party to General Stanley's division. Returned to camp about noon. April 30.-Moved forward with the division across Chambers' Creek. May 1.-Recrossed Chambers Creek. Ma
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