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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 2 Browse Search
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na, Virginia, and other States. Its spirit and its demonstrations left no doubt of the fixed resolve of the master-spirits to take their State out of the Union, even in defiance of a majority of her voters. But they concluded to await the opportunity which South Carolina was preparing. This opportunity was the taking of Fort Sumter; when Gov. Ellis proceeded to seize the U. S. Branch Mint at Charlotte April 20th. and the Federal Arsenal at Fayetteville; April 22d. and thereupon April 26th. to call an extra session of the Legislature. This session commenced May 1st, and in a few days thereafter resulted in the passage of the following: Whereas, By an unwarranted and unprecedented usurpation of power by the Administration at Washington City, the Government of the United States of America has been subverted; and whereas, the honor, dignity, and welfare, of the people of North Carolina imperatively demand that they should resist, at all hazards, such usurpation; and wherea
osed May 1. the absurd altercation by sending a force from his ships to take down the flag: a vast crowd looking sullenly on, or giving vent to their wrath only in idle curses. They failed to comprehend their position; but they respected the two brass howitzers, well manned and supported, which stood in front of the City Hall while the operation was quietly and thoroughly performed. Capt. Farragut had not waited to obtain formal possession of the city before moving up Afternoor of April 26. to the two forts at Carrollton, eight miles above, where lie was surprised to find the gun-carriages on fire and the guns spiked. The works were formidable, but constructed to resist an advance from above; so that, being taken in reverse, they had been adjudged indefensible. Gen. Butler, having witnessed from the Saxon the success of Farragut's attempt to pass the Rebel forts and barrier and destroy their fleet forbidding approach to New Orleans. made haste to join his land forces bel
ccupied by a Union force of 4,500 men, under Gen. Gordon Granger, Van Dorn, with a superior force, assailed, April 10. with intent to capture it; but was easily beaten off, with a loss of 200 or 300, including 80 prisoners; our loss being 37 only. A few days later, Maj.-Gen. J. J. Reynolds pushed out, April 20. with his division and two brigades of cavalry, to McMinnville; whence he drove out Morgan, talking 130 prisoners, destroying a large amount of Rebel store;, and returning April 26. without loss. Col. Watkins, 6th Kentucky, with 500 cavalry, surprised April 27. a Rebel camp on the Carter's creek pike, 8 miles from Franklin; capturing 140 men, 250 horses and mules, and destroying a large amount of camp equipage. Col. A. D. Streight, 51st Indiana, at the head of 1,800 cavalry, was next dispatched April 29. by Rosecrans to the rear of Bragg's army, with instructions to cut the railroads in northwestern Georgia, and-destroy generally all depots of supplies and
t Gibson, in the rear of Grand Gulf, the General decided to cross at this point; and, by daylight next morning, April 30. both gunboats and transports were ferrying over the 13th corps; our soldiers, so fast as landed, taking three days rations in their haversacks, and pushing out on the road to Port Gibson, followed by the 17th corps. Meantime, Gen. Sherman, with the 15th corps, had been left above Vicksburg, expecting to follow on the track of the 13th the 17th, until he received April 26. a letter from Gen. Grant, near Carthage, depicting the badness of the roads, and directing his to remain where he was for the present. Two days later, Grant wrote him that he proposed to attack Grand Gulf next day, and suggesting a simultaneous feint on the Rebel batteries near Haines's Bluff. Sherman accordingly embarked Blair's division on ten steam boats, and proceeded April 29-10 A. M. to the mouth of the Yazoo, where he found Capt. Breese, with the iron-clads Black Hawk, Choctaw,
and was then ready for the fight with which Marmaduke, with four brigades, soon accommodated him: the place being first formally summoned by order of Maj.-Gen. Sterling Price (who was not within 100 miles)--30 minutes being allowed for an answer; but only one was taken. The enemy next shelled a while; while another summons was sent; but McNeil refused to stop firing or to make any answer. And now gunboats were seen coming up with reenforcements to the besieged, and Marmaduke drew off, April 26. having lost considerably, and commenced his retreat toward Arkansas; which he was enabled, by burning bridges, to prosecute with little loss — McNeil having been ranked by Gen. Vandever, who arrived with the reenforcements, and whose ideas of pursuit were of the slow-and-easy pattern. Two or three ineffective skirmishes occurred between our advance and the Rebel rear: McNeil, in the last, having his horse shot: but Marmaduke got over the St. Francis unharmed, and was thenceforth safe; ret
nfantry and artillery. It encountered some fighting in forcing disputed crossings at some of the larger rivers, and captured Columbia, S. C., General C. R. Woods' Division occupying the city at the time it was burned. The corps was also in line at the battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 19, 1865; but General Slocum had won a substantial victory with his wing of the Army, and but little fighting, comparatively, devolved upon the Army of the Tennessee. Johnston's Army having surrendered April 26th, time corps continued its northward march, and, arriving at Washington May 20th, participated in the Grand Review of May 24, 1865. It proceeded, June 2d, to Louisville, Ky., and in the latter part of that month the Second Division was ordered to Little Rock, Ark., where it served with the Army of Occupation. The organization was discontinued August 1, 1865. Sixteenth Corps. Hernando Coldwater Town Creek Siege of Vicksburg Jackson Collierville Meridian March Snake Cre
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 13: aggregate of deaths in the Union Armies by States--total enlistment by States--percentages of military population furnished, and percentages of loss — strength of the Army at various dates casualties in the Navy. (search)
10 9 -- 19 Sept. 7 Sachem Johnson Sabine Pass 7 Wounded not stated. -- 7 1864.               Feb. 1 Underwriter Westervelt Neuse River 9 20 19 48 April 26 Cricket Gorringe Red River 12 19 -- More than half the crew.31 April 26 Hindman Pearce Red River 3 5 -- 8 April 26 Juliet Shaw Red River -- -- -- 15 April 26 Hindman Pearce Red River 3 5 -- 8 April 26 Juliet Shaw Red River -- -- -- 15 May 13 Covington Lord Red River -- -- -- 44 May 31 Water Witch Pendergrast Ogeechee River 2 12 -- 14 June 19 Kearsarge Winslow Cherbourg 1 2 -- 3 June 24 Queen City Goudy White River 2 8 -- 10 June 24 Tyler Bache White River 3 15 -- 18 June 24 Naumkeag Rogers White River June 24 Fawn Grove White River Aug. 5 April 26 Juliet Shaw Red River -- -- -- 15 May 13 Covington Lord Red River -- -- -- 44 May 31 Water Witch Pendergrast Ogeechee River 2 12 -- 14 June 19 Kearsarge Winslow Cherbourg 1 2 -- 3 June 24 Queen City Goudy White River 2 8 -- 10 June 24 Tyler Bache White River 3 15 -- 18 June 24 Naumkeag Rogers White River June 24 Fawn Grove White River Aug. 5 Hartford Farragut's flag-ship. Drayton Mobile Bay 25 28 -- 53 Aug. 5 Brooklyn Alden Mobile Bay 11 43 -- 54 Aug. 5 Lackawanna Marchand Mobile Bay 4 35 -- 39 Aug. 5 Oneida Mullany Mobile Bay 8 30 -- 38 Aug. 5 Monongahela Strong Mobile Bay -- 6 -- 6 Aug. 5 Metacomet Jouett Mobile Bay 1 2 -- 3 Aug. 5 Ossipee Le Ro
amazing proposition that the national controversy between the North and South be submitted to the arbitration of Lord Lyons, the British Minister. Finding all his protests unavailing, and his proposal for arbitration rejected, and preparation being made to forward troops from Annapolis to Washington, he hit upon another equally remarkable obstacle to the defence of the national capital. He issued a proclamation calling upon the Maryland legislature to meet at Annapolis, on Friday, the 26th of April, for the purpose of taking action in that behalf. He then made a protest against my taking possession of the railroad, because it would prevent the members of the legislature from getting to Annapolis. His letter is as follows:-- executive chamber, Annapolis, Friday, April 23, 1861. Dear Sir:--Having by virtue of the power vested in me by the Constitution of Maryland, summoned the legislature of the State to assemble on Friday, the 26th inst., and Annapolis being the place in w
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
In passing Vicksburg, she was damaged in the hull and had a steam-pipe cut away, but this was soon repaired. The Henry Clay was set on fire by bursting shells, and burned up; one of my yawls picked up her pilot floating on a piece of wreck, and the bulk of her crew escaped in their own yawl-boat to the shore above. The Silver Wave, Captain McMillan, the same that was with us up Steele's Bayou, passed safely, and she also rendered good service afterward. Subsequently, on the night of April 26th, six other transports with numerous barges loaded with hay, corn, freight, and provisions, were drifted past Vicksburg; of these the Tigress was hit, and sunk just as she reached the river-bank below, on our side. I was there with my yawls, and saw Colonel Lagow, of General Grant's staff, who had passed the batteries in the Tigress, and I think he was satisfied never to attempt such a thing again. Thus General Grant's army had below Vicksburg an abundance of stores, and boats with which
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
ed an answer from General Johnston, agreeing to meet me again at Bennett's house the next day, April 26th, at noon. He did not even know that General Grant was in Raleigh. General Grant advised me t and push the enemy in every direction. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Richmond, Virginia, April 26--9.30 P. M. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: Generals Meade, Sheridan, and Wright, are ture General Johnston's army, actually surrendered to me at the time, at Greensboroa, on the 26th of April, simply excited my contempt for a judgment such as he was supposed to possess. The assertioarmy of eighty thousand men had been at Goldsboroa from March 22d to the date of his dispatch, April 26th; and such a train would have been composed of from fifteen to thirty-two six-mule teams to hav at Richmond. I answered by a cipher-dispatch that I had seen his dispatch to Mr. Stanton, of April 26th, embraced in the second bulletin, which I regarded as insulting, declined his hospitality, and
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