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mischief, almost without molestation. New-York Harbor was five times as well protected as Boston. For these and other reasons, the Governor asked the President to comply with his request. He thought that he had a right to demand the protection asked for, which would have before this been furnished by the State itself, but for the protests made by the Government. A copy of this letter was sent to the Secretary of the Navy, Postmaster-General Blair, Mr. Sumner, and others. On the second day of May, the Secretary of the Navy acknowledged the receipt of the letter, and said he had not at his disposal a vessel of the description asked for that could be spared from present service. He thought that a vessel best adapted to the coast defences of Massachusetts and New England would be a fast cruiser stationed at Boston, and always prepared for service. Such a vessel, besides affording security to Boston, could proceed to any scene of danger on the coast at short notice. An iron-clad
rced to live upon the country. As soon as thoroughly rested and supplied, we are promised another expedition whose results I hope to report from my own knowledge. You will better appreciate the importance of the expedition, when told that its object is the destruction of the Newbern bridge, which has been attempted several times each campaign of the war, and every time has failed, To General George Crook was left the honor of succeeding where all others before him had failed. On the second of May, the General and command left the Kanawha valley, to destroy the line of communication over the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. The column moved towards the railroad by way of Fayette and Princeton — White, to protect its right; General Averill, with a strong mounted force, marched by Logan Court House, intending to strike at Saltville, a branch railroad, and to destroy it and the main line to Dublin depot; this latter is the railroad station for the town of Newbern. To deceive th
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
h of May. No mention of his presence is made in any accounts of Chancellorsville, nor in the Southern history. Jackson contended with Hooker on the first and second of May, while Early fought Sedgwick, near Fredericksburg. On the third, Stewart succeeded Jackson. Hooker's and Lee's forces. Up to the meeting of Congress, Hok--thirty-two thousand men. General Hooker telegraphed, April thirteen: All of Longstreet's forces that have gone from here, left in January and February. May second, he telegraphed: Longstreet has three divisions at Suffolk. When they left Lee they were each eight thousand strong. D. H. Hill is ordered from Washington to reinforce Longstreet's corps. May second, General Hill reported by letter to Longstreet, the arrival of an entire division. This arrival was in addition to the forces from Washington, North Carolina. Spies sent into his camp reported the forces on the Blackwater from thirty thousand to thirty-two thousand. Union men, des
Rappahannock. During the presence of Longstreet's wing at Suffolk, Lee, with Jackson's wing, was confronted by the army of Hooker. Hooker was advised of every change in my front, and assured that I would hold Longstreet as long as possible in order that he might destroy Lee. He was urged to strike before aid could be sent to the Rapidan. Perhaps a division, or a portion of one, joined Lee, in spite of the interruption of the communications by Stoneman. Longstreet did not; for his horses and servants fell into our hands near Suffolk, on the fourth of May. No mention of his presence is made in any accounts of Chancellorsville, nor in the Southern history. Jackson contended with Hooker on the first and second of May, while Early fought Sedgwick, near Fredericksburg. On the third, Stewart succeeded Jackson.
ounty, by General Thayer, who had marched from Fort Smith. After several severe skirmishes, in which the enemy was defeated, General Steele reached Camden, which he occupied about the middle of April. On learning the defeat and consequent retreat of General Banks on Red river, and the loss of one of his own trains at Marks' mill, in Dallas county, General Steele determined to fall back to the Arkansas river. He left Camden on the twenty-sixth of April, and reached Little Rock on the second of May. On the thirtieth of April, the enemy attacked him while crossing Saline river at Jenkins' ferry, but was repulsed with considerable loss. Our loss was about six hundred in killed, wounded, and prisoners. Major-General Canby, who had been assigned to the command of the Military division of the West Mississippi, was therefore directed to send the Nineteenth Army Corps to join the armies operating against Richmond, and to limit the remainder of his command to such operations as might
s, did not conceal, however, the apprehensions naturally arising from a total ignorance of the political conditions to be attached to their future state. Anything at all would be preferable to this dread uncertainty. On the evening of the second of May I returned to Hilton Head, and there, for the first time, received the New York papers of April twenty-eighth, containing Secretary Stanton's despatch of nine A. M. of the twenty-seventh of April to General Dix, including General Halleck's, f never before embraced in so small a space as in the newspaper paragraph headed Sherman's truce disregarded, authenticated as official by Mr. Secretary Stanton, and published in the New York papers of April twenty-eighth. During the night of May second, at Hilton Head, having concluded my business in the Department of the South, I began my return to meet my troops then marching toward Richmond from Raleigh. On the morning of the third we ran into Charleston harbor, where I had the pleasure t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 5: Lowell (search)
ith me. Next day finish and copy my verses. Got all done just in time to prevent the mail. After dinner drove J. home. Evening, read Swift, that hog of letters, who had wit enough to know the worth of pearls, though fonder of garbage and of rooting among ordure. [We soon come to the creation of the Town and Country Club.] Now it is Sunday morning and here I am with you. Since I wrote to you, the Town and country Club has been got up. Our first regular meeting is next Wednesday, (2d May,) when E. [Emerson] is to read an address. The Club is a singular agglomeration. All persons whom other folks think crazy, and who return the compliment, belong to it. It is as if all the eccentric particles which had refused to revolve in the regular routine of the world's orbit, and had flowed off in different directions, had come together to make a planet of their own. Plenty of fine luminous matter there is, though. One thing is certain, it fitly represents the extreme gauche. The di
below the town, and sending them to aid his right wing; and, while General Lee was fully engaged in the wilderness near Chancellorsville, he suddenly assaulted and carried Marye's Heights, the strongest Confederate position near the town. On the 2d and 3d of May, General Lee drove the enemy from all his positions on our left, and immediately returning to his own right, re-took our lost positions and drove the Federals to the shelter of heavy batteries on the north bank of the river. On returapproach of night, would have made the retreat an utter rout. Having placed his men in position ready for any movement that the critical occasion might require, he rode forward with several of his staff about 8 o'clock on Saturday evening, the 2d of May, to reconnoitre the Federal lines in front in the deep forest. Soon coming on the enemy's advancing line of skirmishers, they turned and rode rapidly back towards their own men, who, mistaking the party for Federal cavalry, stooped and deliver
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 8: battles of Chancellorsville, Thoroughfare Gap and Gettysburg.--wounded at Gettysburg and ordered home. (search)
Chapter 8: battles of Chancellorsville, Thoroughfare Gap and Gettysburg.--wounded at Gettysburg and ordered home. At midnight, May 2, we were ordered to fall in, and marched to the banks of the Rappahannock, where a pontoon was again being thrown across. It looked like the 11th of December over again. The officers were called together and ordered to select twenty-five men from the regiment, who would volunteer for whatever duty they might be called upon to perform. One officer was to ghtly wounded but none killed. On the morning of the 6th we fell back to our rifle pits in the city, recrossed the river, remaining on duty until the pontoons were taken up, and then marched back to our old camp. We had not slept an hour since May 2, and were completely tired out. I slept all night and awoke thinking it was time for breakfast and found it was three P. M. We moved our camp to a delightful spot on the top of the hill, resumed our daily drills, and were once more under stric
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 10: battles of the Wilderness, Todd's Tavern and Laurel Hill.--Engagement at the Bloody Angle. (search)
Chapter 10: battles of the Wilderness, Todd's Tavern and Laurel Hill.--Engagement at the Bloody Angle. We had now quite a respectable regiment, numbering two field, ten line officers, and about three hundred and fifty men. We broke camp the 2d of May, were ordered to move, and soon found ourselves crossing the river to engage in the Battle of the Wilderness, before we realized it being in line of battle moving forward. Our first order was to deploy as skirmishers and let the line which was being hotly pressed pass in rear to receive a fresh supply of ammunition, while we held the line. I had about twenty men in my command. We advanced as ordered, but soon received a fire from our flank and rear, and found that the rebels had broken our lines. I gave the order By the right flank, double quick, and we went quicker than that. We dodged behind trees as we ran, and the rebels were so near that in looking back I saw them capture Thompson of Company B; with the exception of one o
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