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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 2 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 2 2 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Sedgwick at Fredericksburg and Salem Heights. (search)
o be allowed to examine the grounds, and did so during the afternoon, and at night came to Lee and said he thought he (Lee) was right; it would be inexpedient to attack them. Move then, said Lee, at dawn to-morrow, up to Anderson. Sickles's and Reynolds's corps having subsequently been ordered to Chancellorsville by Hooker, Sedgwick was left alone below Fredericksburg with about 24,000 men, the Sixth Corps being by several thousand the largest in the army. During the evening of the 2d of May Hooker sent word to Sedgwick to take up his line on the Chancellorsville road and attack and destroy any forces he might meet. He also added that he (Sedgwick) would probably fall upon the rear of Lee's forces, and between them they would use Lee up. If Hooker thought an insignificant force was in Sedgwick's front, the engagement soon to take place showed how mistaken he was. Sedgwick received the order about 11 o'clock at night. He at once advanced his command to the Bowling Green road
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's knowledge of Hooker's movements. (search)
if a real attempt is made to cross the river it will be above Fredericksburg. Very respectfully, R. E. Lee, General The letter was indorsed by Jackson, Respectfully referred to General Colston for his guidance. It was also marked confidential, and both the front and the back of the envelope were marked private, so that not even my adjutant-general should open it in case of my absence. The Federal writers have wondered why Jackson's corps did not complete its work on the evening of May 2d. They do not realize the condition of our troops after their successful charge on Howard. We had forced our way through brush so dense that the troops were nearly stripped of their uniforms. Brigades, regiments, and companies had become so mixed that they could not be handled; besides which the darkness of evening was so intensified by the shade of the dense woods that nothing could be seen a few yards off. The halt at that time was not a mistake, but a necessity. So far from intending t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in the Chancellorsville campaign. (search)
S., Lieut. Robert Clarke; E, 4th U. S., Lieut. Samuel S. Elder. The casualties in the Union forces during the campaign were as follows:  Killed.Wounded.Captured or Missing.Total. Germanna Ford, April 2914 5 Franklin's Crossing, April 29--May 2218 20 Fitzhugh's Crossing, April 29--May 2191449172 Stoneman's Raid, Apl. 29--May 1147139150 Old Wilderness Tavern, April 3011 2 Chancellorsville, April 30 3 3 Spotsylvania C. H., April 303123651 Rapidan Station, May 11142439 ChancellorsviMay 2191449172 Stoneman's Raid, Apl. 29--May 1147139150 Old Wilderness Tavern, April 3011 2 Chancellorsville, April 30 3 3 Spotsylvania C. H., April 303123651 Rapidan Station, May 11142439 Chancellorsville, May 1--610826849421412,145 Fredericksburg, or Marye's and Salem Heights, May 3, 4493271014974,700   Grand total16069762591917,287 According to the returns for April 30, 1863 ( Official Records, Vol. XXV., Pt. II., p. 320), the effective strength of Hooker's army was, in round numbers, about 130,000, distributed as follows: Infantry, 111,000; cavalry, 11,000; and artillery, 8000, with 404 pieces of the l
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
cupying New Carthage, and that there were nine Federal gun-boats between Vicksburg and Port Hudson. Colonel B. H. Grierson [Federal] set out from La Grange on the 17th of April on his noted raid through Mississippi, terminating at Baton Rouge, May 2d. The mischief reported was the burning of some bridges, engines, and cars near Newton, the destruction of ammunition and cars at Hazelhurst, and the burning of the railroad depot and cars at Brookhaven. Several brigades of infantry were detachel terms with his antagonist, by giving him the troops in April actually sent to him late in May. This would have formed an army of above fifty thousand men. General Grant landed two corps, less than 30,000 men, on the 30th of April and 1st and 2d of May; and it was not until the 8th of May that the arrival of Sherman's corps increased his force to about 43,000 men. The Confederate reinforcements could have been sent as well early in April as late in May; and then, without bad generalship on ou
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
We followed up our victory until night overtook us, about two miles from Port Gibson; then the troops went into bivouac for the night. We started next morning [May 2d] for Port Gibson as soon as it was light enough to see the road. We were soon in the town, and I was delighted to find that the enemy had not stopped to contest rierson continued his movement with about 1000 men, breaking the Vicksburg and Meridian railroad and the New Orleans and Jackson railroad, arriving at Baton Rouge May 2d. This raid was of great importance, for Grierson had attracted the attention of the enemy from the main movement against Vicksburg.--From Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. During the night of the 2d of May the bridge over the North Fork was repaired, and the troops commenced crossing at 5 the next morning. Before the leading brigade was over, it was fired upon by the enemy from a Major-General J. S. Bowen, C. S. A. From a photograph. commanding position; but they were soon driven of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 6.79 (search)
e 1st, 2d, and 3d Louisiana native guards (a name captured by General Butler), Colonels Spencer H. Stafford, Nathan W. Daniels, and John A. Nelson. I believe these were the first negro troops mustered into the service of the United States.--R. B. I. Two weeks before this the northern column, under Pope, had been called from Fort Pillow to Corinth; consequently there was no longer a northern column to cooperate with; and Jackson, Mississippi, meant Beauregard's rear. Promptly on the 2d of May Farragut moved the fleet up the river, and on the 8th General Butler sent Brigadier-General Thomas Williams, with 1400 men of the 4th Wisconsin and 6th Michigan regiments, and two sections of Everett's 6th Massachusetts battery. On the 12th the troops landed at Baton Rouge and took possession of the town. The advance of the fleet anchored below Vicksburg on the 18th, when Commander Lee and General Williams jointly demanded from the authorities the surrender of the town, which was refused
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
lderness Tavern. Sedgwick encamped for the night three miles south of the ford. The sixty-five miles of trains were until 2 P. M. of May 5th in passing over Culpeper Mine Ford and Germanna Ford. General Humphreys, who was Meade's chief-of-staff at the time, states that the halt of the infantry on the 4th at Chancellorsville and the Wilderness was caused by the difficulty in moving the trains across the Rapidan. General Law, who commanded a brigade under Longstreet, states that on the 2d of May General Lee, in the presence of a number of his officers, expressed the opinion that the Union army would cross the river at Germanna or Ely's Ford. [See p. 118.] General Lee's headquarters were at Orange Court House; Longstreet, with his corps, was distant at Gordonsville; Ewell was near at hand on the Rapidan, above Mine Run; and A. P. Hill was on his left, higher up the stream; and it seems that Lee intended to move with his whole force against Grant's right flank as soon as Grant was
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
ide of that stream with some loss. Hampton's cavalry brigade and battery of horse artillery proved of great assistance in his withdrawal from his hazardous position. The battles of Spotsylvania Court House closed with the 19th of May. It gives a clearer idea of the nature of this tremendous contest to group by Major-General Edward Johnson, C. S. A. From a photograph. days and count its various combats from the beginning of the campaign: On May 5th, three; on May 6th, four; on May 8th, two; on May 10th, five; on May 12th, repeated assaults during twenty hours in salient and two combats on another part of the line; May 18th, one; May 19th, one. It is no wonder that on these fields the Confederate ordnance officers gathered more than 120,000 pounds of lead, which was recast in bullets and did work again before the campaign of 1864 was closed. Lee, discovering that Grant had set out on the 20th of May on his flanking movement southward, immediately marched so as to throw his a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
an increase to the fighting strength of the army of 3399 from the return of men absent with leave in the corps of Hood, Hardee, Wheeler, and in the artillery. The return of May 20th is missing, but that of June 10th shows an increase since May 20th of 649 returned from desertion and 799 joined by enlistment. General Johnston has to account, between April 30th and June 10th, for at least the following men available for battle: Present for duty at DaltonApril 30th52,992 Mercer's brigadeMay 2d 2,800 Cantey's divisionMay 7th 5,300 Loring's divisionMay 10th, 11th, and 12th5,145 French's detachmentMay 12th 550 French's divisionMay 19th 4,174 Jackson's cavalryMay 17th 4,477 Jackson's cavalry increase beforeJune 10th643 Quarles's brigadeMay 26th 2,200 Two regiments Georgia State line  1,200 Furloughed men returned 3,399 Recruits 799 Returned deserters 649      84,328 All these figures are official except for Mercer's brigade and the two regiments of the Georgia State
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of New Market, Va., May 15th, 1864. (search)
of April, 1864, information reached us that General Sigel had established himself at Winchester, and was preparing for a forward movement with over eight thousand infantry, twenty-five hundred cavalry, and three or four field-batteries. On the 2d of May I broke camp at Mount Crawford, in Rockingham County, something over seventy miles from Winchester, and moved to meet Sigel and find out as far as possible his strength and designs and report the facts to General Lee. I had with me the 62d Virs, all it would hold. But under State laws even they were a part of the reserves, a militia force liable to be called out in emergencies.--J. D. I. My veteran troops, effective present, numbered but 1492 men when we left Mount Crawford on the 2d of May, to which should be added about 100 men scouting either in front of or behind Sigel. Harman's reserves did not amount to one thousand men, and these were undisciplined and armed mostly with hunting-rifles and shot-guns. This was the total sca
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