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ff, commandant of the post, was killed while charging at the head of the garrison guard to dislodge the enemy when he had turned the left flank. Louisiana has not lost during the war a truer man or a more thorough-going soldier. The list might be prolonged, for we left behind, filling soldiers' graves, many of the bravest and the best; and if any credit shall attach to the defense of Spanish Fort, it be. longs to the heroes whose sleep shall no more be disturbed by the cannon's roar. On May 8th, upon the occasion of the surrender of General Taylor, General Gibson issued an address to the Louisiana brigade, in which he said: There is nothing in your career to look back upon with regret. You have always been in front of the enemy; you have never feasted in soft places in the rear, nor fought your battles at comfortable firesides. Your banners are garlanded with the emblems of every soldierly virtue. More than twenty battlefields have seen them unfurled. They were never lowered
nce proved too much for hard hitting. This was an ugly surprise for Grant, unused to checks. Giving himself no rest, however, the great Hammer of the North struck again and again, seasoning his blows with a little maneuvering. From May 4th to May 8th he learned the metal of our army in Virginia. From May 8th to 19th he wasted nearly two weeks and thousands of men in looking for a weak spot in Lee's army. Lee, meeting him at all points, exposed no weak spot. From out the checks and disappoMay 8th to 19th he wasted nearly two weeks and thousands of men in looking for a weak spot in Lee's army. Lee, meeting him at all points, exposed no weak spot. From out the checks and disappointments of Spottsylvania Court House, among which was the death of the gallant Sedgwick, sprang that grim vaunt, I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer. Grant came South through the gloomy Wilderness which, one year before, had so nearly stranded the army of the Potomac. Lee stretched no hand to stop Grant's crossing the Rapidan; he was bent on striking once for the sake of those dreary woods of fortunate Confederate memory. Ewell's corps on the morning of the 5th c
ilkes. When Polk's army joined Johnston, Ector's brigade was brought into the field, including the Tenth dismounted cavalry, Col. C. R. Earp; Fourteenth, Col. John L. Camp; and the Thirty-second, Col. J. A. Andrews. Harrison's Texas cavalrymen fought under Wheeler, and under W. H. Jackson was the Texas cavalry brigade of Gen. Lawrence S. Ross. Douglas' battery, under Lieut. John H. Bingham, was with Hood's corps. Granbury's brigade was in the heat of the fighting from Dug Gap, on the 8th of May, till the investment of Atlanta. On May 27th it took a conspicuous part in the defeat of the Federals at Pickett's, near New Hope church. According to General Cleburne's report, Granbury was posted amid the hills, near a deep ravine, with a natural glacis within 30 or 40 yards of his front. Here was the brunt of the battle, the enemy advancing along this front in numerous and constantly-reinforced lines. His men displayed a courage worthy of an honorable cause, pressing in steady thro
stant Adjutant-General. Grand recapitulation of the losses sustained by the army of the Potomac and the army of the James, from May 5th, 1864, to April 9th, 1865. Compiled in the Adjutant-General's office, Washington. name of battle.killed.wounded.missing. Officers.Enlisted Men.OfficersEnlisted Men.Officers.Enlisted Men.Aggregate.remarks. Wilderness, May 5th to 7th, 18641172,1443728,413992,80313,948 Swift Creek and Chester Station, May 6th to 10th, 18644801043461589 Spottsylvania, May 8th to 21st, 18641192,1523788,982311,93913,601 Drury's Bluff, May 12th to 16th, 186417373671,654401,3503,501 North Anna, May 23rd to 27th, 1864111752876451601.143 Totopotomoy, May 21st to 31st, 18645941434452509 Gold Harbor and Bethseda Church, May 31st to June 12th, 18641061,6632796,473331,50410,058 Deep Bottom, July 25th to 28th, 1864451718519266 Deep Bottom, August 14th to 18th, 186412247621,177145012,013 Weldon Railroad, August 18th to 21st, 18641118661764168981,936 Ream's Station,
tioned in General Battle's report, operations May 8th. No. 88—(1217) Same assignment as above, Alderness, May 5, 6 and 7, 1864; Spottsylvania, May 8 to 18, 1864; Second Cold Harbor, June 1 to 12,derness, May 5, 6 and 7, 1864; Spottsylvania, May 8th to 18th; Winchester, July 24th, and all the nerness, May 5, 6, and 7, 1864; Spottsylvania, May 8th to 18th; Salem Church, Cold Harbor, June 1 to Wilderness, May 5 to 7, 1864; Spottsylvania, May 8th-18th; the Crater, July 30th; Burgess' Farm, O Wilderness, May 5 to 7, 1864; Spottsylvania, May 8th to 18th; Winchester, July 24th, and in the vae Wilderness May 5 to 7, 1864; Spottsylvania, May 8th to 8th, and in the many fights around Petersbthe Wilderness, May 5-7, 1864; Spottsylvania, May 8th to 18th; Hanover Court House, May 30th; and Sidge, February 25 to 27, 1864; around Dalton, May 8th to 12th; Resaca, May 13th to 16th; Adairsvill, in command of regiment: Loss at Rocky Face, May 8th, 2 killed, 15 wounded; at Resaca, May 15th, 7
r commanding. No. 36—(535, 536) Mentioned in Col. C. R. Barteau's report, Grierson's raid from La Grange, Tenn., April 22, 1863. (560-580) Mentioned in Gen. Daniel Ruggles' report of May 13th. (690) Commended in General Ruggles' report of action at King's Creek, near Tupelo, Miss. (691) Col. J. Cunningham, in his report of action at King's creek, May 5th, says: Two killed. (692) Mentioned by Maj. W. A. Hewlett, May 5th. (693) Mentioned in Col. C. R. Barteau's report of King's Creek, May 8th. No. 37—(483) General Ruggles, in his report of fight at Rocky Crossing, Tallahatchee river, June 20, 1863, says: Col. C. R. Barteau's Second Tennessee, Col. William Boyle's First Alabama, and R. H. Earle's Second Alabama regiments of cavalry vied with each other in pressing the enemy home. No. 38—(291) Gen. G. M. Dodge, May 9, 1863, says: The Second Alabama arrived at Okolona from Pensacola. (326) Mentioned as near Okolona, May 18th. (733) Maj. W. M. Inge's battali
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Battles of the armies in Virginia in which Alabama troops were engaged. (search)
th, 6th, 12th, 26th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 13th, 14th Inf.; Hardaway's Batty. Walker's Ford, W. Va., Dec. 2.—Federal, loss 9 k, 43 w, 12 m. 1864. Morton's Ford, Va.; Feb. 6.—Federal, loss 10 k, 208 w, 42 m. Wilderness, Va., May 5 to 7. Gen. Lee, 61,000 total loss 11,400.— Federal, Gen. Grant, 118,000; loss 2246 k, 12,037 w, 3383 m. Alabama troops, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, 44th, 47th, 48th, 61st Inf.; Reeves' Batty. Spottsylvania, Va., May 8 to 21. Gen. Lee, 9,000.—Federal, Gen. Grant; loss 2725 k, 13,416 w, 2258 m. Alabama troops, same as at Wilderness. Arrowfield Church, Va., May 9-10.—Federal, Gen. Butler; loss 36 k, 188 w, 19 m. Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 12 to 16. Gen. Beauregard, 25,000; total loss 2500.—Federal, Gen. Butler, 35,000; loss 390 k, 2380 w, 1390 m. Alabama troops, 41st, 43d, 59th, 60th, 23d Battn. Inf. Ware Bottom Church, Va., May 18 to 20.—Federal, loss 103 k, 796 w, 49 m. Alabama troo
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Battles of the Western army in which Albama troops were engaged. (search)
. Cav. Ridge, Ga., May 7. Gen. Jos. Wheeler; total loss 13.—Federal, total loss 55. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 8th, 10th Conf. Cav. Dug Gap, Ga., May 8. Gen. Jos. Wheeler; total loss 30.—Federal, total loss 450. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 8th, 10th Conf. Cav. Cleveland Rd., Ga., May 8. Gen. Jos. WheeMay 8. Gen. Jos. Wheeler; total loss 2.— Federal, total loss 26. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 8th Conf., and 53d Cav., and Snodgrass' Battn. Buzzard Roost Gap, Ga., May 8. Gen. Pettus.—Federal, Gen. Howard, 4th corps. Alabama troops, 20th, 23d, 30th, 31st, 46th Inf. Rocky Face Ridge, Tunnel Hill, Mill Cr. Gap, Buzzard Roost, Snake Cr., andMay 8. Gen. Pettus.—Federal, Gen. Howard, 4th corps. Alabama troops, 20th, 23d, 30th, 31st, 46th Inf. Rocky Face Ridge, Tunnel Hill, Mill Cr. Gap, Buzzard Roost, Snake Cr., and near Dalton, May 9. Gen. Johnston, 43,000; total loss 600.—Federal, Gen. Sherman, 98,797; loss 200 k, 637 w. Alabama troops, 16th, 20th, 30th, 36th, 37th, 40th Inf. Resaca, Ga., May 9. Gen. Canty. Alabama troops, Canty's brigade. Railroad, Ga., May 9. Gen. Wheeler: total loss 3.—Federal, total loss 22. Alabama t
the death of Colonel Garrott, Pettus commanded the regiment, and was surrendered with it, but was exchanged later in the year 1863. On September 18th he was commissioned brigadier-general, and assigned to succeed S. D. Lee and the lamented Tracy in the command of the heroic brigade distinguished at Port Gibson, Baker's Creek and Vicksburg. He and his gallant brigade were in the front of the fight at the opening of the Georgia campaign of 1864, holding their position on Rocky Face ridge, May 8th, against a bloody assault. At New Hope church again they fought in the front line under fire, and at Powder Springs, the battles around Atlanta and Jonesboro, wherever Stevenson's division was engaged. During the battle on Lookout Mountain he led the Twentieth, Thirty-first and Forty-sixth regiments to the relief of Moore and Walthall, and, said General Stevenson, in his general orders of November 27th: It was Pettus' brigade which first checked an enemy flushed with victory on Lookout Mo
oops from the North, and finally massed before Corinth 110,000 fighting men, all under the command of General Halleck. The Confederate army had prepared a semi-oval fortified line, covering the town to the northeast; and in front of this, up to where the Mobile & Ohio railroad crosses the State line, Halleck erected an elaborate line of works and posted his great army. Meanwhile the Confederates were not entirely idle. Active skirmishing had accompanied the advance of the enemy, and on May 8th Gen. Earl Van Dorn marched out of the works and formed a line north of the Memphis & Charleston railroad. On the 10th he advanced and attacked the enemy's right at Farmington; but the Federals retreated with such expedition that an engagement could not be brought on, and nothing resulted but the burning of the bridge, and the capture of a few prisoners and a considerable lot of arms and property. The Thirty-seventh Mississippi was in this action, and was commended by General Ruggles, who
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