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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
ed from McDonald's Station, on the East Tennessee railroad, in company with brigade, division, and corps, on Tuesday, May 3, 1864, at 12 m. Arrived at Catoosa Springs and encamped for the night. Marched again on May 7, and arrived at Tunnel Hill May 8; encamped for the night. May 9, moved forward to near RockLy Face Ridge, and took position in support of the Thirty-Second Indiana Infantry; same day the Eightyninth relieved the Thirty-fifth Illinois Infantry as skirmishers, and drove the enemynced the line 500 yards to front and right; built breast-works and remained in them May 31, June 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. During the night of the 5th the enemy abandoned his works on our front. June 6, took up line of march in pursuit via Acworth. June 7, 8, 9, remained in camp waiting orders. June 10, marched forward three miles. June 11, took position in line of battle in front of Pine Mountain. June 12, 13, remained in position. June 14, advanced in line of battle and found the enemy's works on P
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
n the direction of Ringgold, Ga., and bivouacked for the night. On the 4th day of May, while on the march to Catoosa Springs, Ga., and when near Salem Church, the Nineteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Col. Charles F. Manderson, was detached as guard to the supply train of the corps, then parked near Parker's Gap. The brigade remained in bivouac near Catoosa Springs until the 7th day of May, 1864, when it marched by way of Tunnel Hill to its position in front of Rocky Face Ridge. On the 8th day of May a demonstration was ordered to be made to develop the position of the enemy. The brigade was formed in two lines, the front line composed of four regiments in line of battle, the rear line of three regiments in columns doubled on the center in readiness to deploy, should it become necessary. Nothing of importance, however, occurred except some skirmishing along the line, which showed the enemy to be on the crest of the ridge in force. The brigade was then ordered to bivouac near the b
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 74 (search)
the campaign since leaving McDonald's Station, Tenn., May 3, 1864, to the time of arrival at Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1864: The regiment moved from McDonald's Station, Tenn., May 3, 1864, under command of Col. Fred. Knefier, and belonged, as it does at present, to the Third Brigade, Third Division, Fourth Army Corps. It went into bivouac at Catoosa Springs, Ga., on the evening of the 5th, and remained until the morning of the 7th, when it moved with the brigade to Tunnel Hill, Ga. On May 8, in front of Rocky Face Ridge, the regiment introduced its exercises for the campaign in a brisk skirmish with the enemy. Since that time it has taken an active part in all the movements, labors, skirmishes, and engagements of the brigade during the entire campaign. At Cassville, Ga., May 19, the regiment, with the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers on the left and the Thirteenth Ohio Volunteers on the right, composed the rear line of the brigade, and though it did not become engaged with the enemy
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
oved with their respective divisions, the Fifth Indiana and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Batteries, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, marched via Red Clay to Catoosa Springs. Bridges' Battery and Sixth Ohio Light Battery marched via Ooltewah to Catoosa Springs. Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, joined the Second Division for duty May 6. On May 7 the batteries marched with their respective divisions to Tunnel Hill, the Fifth Indiana being the only battery engaged on that day. May 8, the Fifth Indiana and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Batteries shelled the enemy upon Rocky Face Ridge. May 9, the Fifth Indiana, Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania, and Bridges' Battery were placed in position on a small ridge between Tunnel Hill and Rocky Face Ridge, and engaged the enemy's batteries and lines, silencing his batteries. On the same day Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, placed a section on the top of Rocky Face Ridge and opened an enfilading fire down the ridge. May 10, the Fi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 91 (search)
September 8. from monthly returns. The Corps was commanded by Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer to August 6; Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson to August 22, and Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis to September 8. May 6.-Preparatory to the general advance against the enemy the corps was concentrated at Stone Church, three miles south of Ringgold, Ga. May 7.-Advanced to Tunnel Hill, encountering the enemy's cavalry, which was driven back by the Second Division, in advance on the direct road. May 8 to 11, inclusive.--Engaged in movements against the enemy in the attempt to dislodge him from Rocky Face Ridge; had severe skirmishing during this time. Alay 12.-Withdrew and moved during the day to Snake Creek Gap to the support of the Army of the Tennessee. May 14 and 15.-Participated in the battle of Resaca. May 16.-The Second Division moved, in compliance with orders, for Rome; encamped fifteen miles on the road. May 17. Moved forward, and when near Rome, in the afternoon
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
No. 92. journal of the First brigade. Hdqrs. First Brig., First Div., 14TH Army Corps, Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. Memorandum of operations from Ringgold, Ga.: May 7.-Marched from Ringgold, seven miles, to a point about one mile and a half south of Tunnel Hill and encamped for the night. May 8.-The brigade moved forward in line of cattle through the valley and over a range of hills lying on west side of the Gordon Spring road, and took position on a ridge about a half mile southwest of Buzzard Roost. Remained in this position until about 10.30 a. m., when the brigade was moved back to the first range of hills, where it lay in line until about 5.30 p. m., when it moved forward to the first position and encamped for the night. May 9.-Received orders to finish a reconnaissance which had been begun by Colonel Wood's brigade, Butterfield's division, around the point of Chattoogata Mountain, south side of the gap. Moved brigade forward, crossing Mill Creek. R
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 99 (search)
No. 95. report of Lieut. Col. Cyrus E. Briant, Eighty-eighth Indiana Infantry. May 6, received orders to be ready to march at daybreak. May 7, broke camp at Ringgold, Ga.; at sunrise passed through Chickamauga Gap; marched to within two miles of Tunnel Hill, taking the road on the right hand to about one mile south of town, where we camped for the night; some cannonading heard on the hill. May 8, moved to the right of Tunnel Hill, passing the day in a valley one mile from Buzzard Roost on Taylor Ridge. May 9, moved forward and formed line on ridge in front of gap; skirmished with the enemy, holding our position; had 1 man wounded. May 11, were relieved by the Seventy-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry at daylight; lay in reserve in front of gap, when we were ordered to march at 6 a. m., May 12, when my command marched in the valley alongside Taylor's Ridge through Sugar Creek Gap, and bivouacked at the earth-works thrown up by Army of the Tennessee. May 13, started to the fr
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 105 (search)
No. 101. report of Lieut. Col. Joseph H. Brigham, Sixty-ninth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 8-August 25. Hdqrs. Sixty-Ninth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infantry, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. The Sixty-ninth Regiment Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, Col. M. F. Moore in command, reached Chattanooga, Tenn., on the 8th day of May, 1864, on return from veteran furlough. May 9, started for the front to join brigade; camped in Rossville, Ga., same night. Next day marched two miles beyond Ringgold, Ga., and went into camp. May 11, broke camp and marched to Buzzard Roost Gap, and there the command reported to General King, commanding Second Brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. On the next evening the regiment continued their line of march, passing through Snake Creek Gap, and reaching the battle-ground of Resaca at sunset on the 13th day of May, and was placed in position on the front line and was relieved late in the evening by the Seventy-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infan
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
ment moved at sunrise, passed through Hooker's Gap, drove back the enemy's outposts, and encamped in a fine open field about three miles from former camp. May 6, remained in camp through the day; three days rations issued to the regiment this p. m., and orders to march at sunrise to-morrow. May 7, at sunrise marched in the direction of Tunnel Hill; the advance of the division encountered considerable opposition, but the enemy was steadily driven, and to-night the army occupied Tunnel Hill. May 8, the regiment moved forward to the front this a. m.; near the gap called Buzzard Roost the enemy are in force; have a good position, and lively skirmishing continues through the day; no casualties in the command. May 9, this morning the regiment advanced its line of skirmishers and met with heavy opposition; in the action Franklin Dalby, private Company I, was killed, and Privates Joseph Rogers, Carroll Ulher, J. Hadrington, W. Swan (Company I), John Collins (Company G), and Leonard F. Burn
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
One hundred and eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Col. George T. Limberg commanding; One hundred and twenty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Col. Henry B. Banning commanding; One hundred and thirteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Lieut. Col. D. B. Warner commanding. May 2, marched from Rossville to Ringgold, Ga., and took position near the gap. May 3 to 7, remained in camp unchanged. May 7, marched to Mill Creek Gap (Buzzard Roost) and formed line, connecting on my left with Fourth Army Corps. May 8, moved my command to the track of Atlantic and Western Railroad, covered the front with double line of skirmishers, under command of Colonel Banning, the Seventy-eighth Illinois and the One hundred and thirteenth Ohio on the right and left of the front line, the remaining three regiments in rear line. With this disposition attacked and drove the enemy from the summit of the first spur of Rocky Face Ridge, which stood directly in the mouth of Mill Creek Gap. The second spur, immediately in
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