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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
ed to the regiment this p. m., and orders to march at sunrise to-morrow. May 7, at sunrise marched in the direction of Tunnel Hill; the advance of the division encountered considerable opposition, but the enemy was steadily driven, and to-night the army occupied Tunnel Hill. May 8, the regiment moved forward to the front this a. m.; near the gap called Buzzard Roost the enemy are in force; have a good position, and lively skirmishing continues through the day; no casualties in the command. May 9, this morning the regiment advanced its line of skirmishers and met with heavy opposition; in the action Franklin Dalby, private Company I, was killed, and Privates Joseph Rogers, Carroll Ulher, J. Hadrington, W. Swan (Company I), John Collins (Company G), and Leonard F. Burnett (Company E), were wounded. May 10, the regiment retains the position gained yesterday; the enemy's sharpshooters very annoying; severe skirmishing all day First Sergt. William M. Howard and Private Frank A. Humilk
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 133 (search)
and Ringgold road in the direction of Ringgold, marched to Ringgold and encamped for the night. May 5, moved at daybreak through Taylor's Gap, advanced to Stone Church, and deployed four companies as skirmishers, keeping the remaining six companies in reserve, and drove the enemy from an eminence one mile in our front; the regiment held its position for the night. May 7, moved through the town of Tunnel Hill, Ga., and took up position on Tunnel Hill Ridge, the enemy being one mile distant. May 9, moved at daybreak to the foot of Rocky Face Ridge; was ordered to deploy five companies as skirmishers, the remaining five companies being held in reserve. We advanced upon the enemy, driving them to the top of the mountain; my men being greatly exposed to the enemy's fire, our loss was heavy, having lost 30 men killed and wounded, including 1 commissioned officer. May 12, made a flank movement to the right, passing through Snake [Creek] Gap at dark. During the engagement at Resaca my re
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
, of the Thirty-fourth Illinois, Captain Ege commanding, to occupy a hill on the right of the railroad, and to the right rear of the crest first taken. These men, in reaching this hill, were compelled to wade the backwater of Mill Creek, waist deep. They plunged into the water, crossed, and scaling the hill at a point where it was so steep that they were compelled to hold on by the undergrowth, drove a battalion of the enemy from it, and held it antil the Ninety-eighth Ohio relieved them. May 9 to 12, position unchanged; constant skirmishing. May 12, marched at 6 a. m. to mouth of Snake Creek Gap. May 13, marched through the gap. May 14, with the Ninety-eighth Ohio, One hundred and eighth Ohio, and Thirty-fourth Illinois in front line, remaining troops in rear line, I was ordered to occupy a position from which a brigade of the Twenty-third Corps had been driven, connecting on my left with the Second Division, Twenty-third Corps, and the Third Division, Fourteenth Corps, on m
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 144 (search)
ga River and joined the division, then commanded by Brig. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, and bivouacked until the morning of the 5th of May, when the brigade marched out to near Catoosa Springs and again bivouacked until the morning of the 7th, when it marched beyond Tunnel Hill about two miles, part of the time under heavy fire from the enemy's batteries. On the morning of the 8th of May the brigade marched toward and confronted the enemy's skirmishers guarding the entrance to Buzzard Roost Gap. May 9, supported the First Brigade skirmish line. May 10, the brigade lay under the fire from the enemy's sharpshooters, In the evening of this day it moved to the front and relieved the First Brigade; Fifty-second Ohio deployed as skirmishers. May 11, remained on the line until dark, at which time it was relieved by a brigade of the Fourth Army Corps. We then moved up the valley about two miles and bivouacked for the night. At daybreak May 13 command marched toward Resaca by way of Snake Cree
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 145 (search)
t. James R. Griffith, Eighty-fifth Illinois Infantry. Hdqrs. Eighty-Fifth Illinois Vol. Infantry, Atlanta, Ga., September 7, 1864. Sir: Concerning the operations of my regiment during the recent campaign, I have the honor to submit the following report: On Tuesday morning, May 3, 1864, the regiment, under command of Col. C. J. Dilworth, marched from Lee and Gordon's Mills in the direction of Ringgold; halted at Ringgold and camped temporarily. The campaign proper opened on the 9th of May, the division to which the Eighty-fifth is attached holding an important position in the line. As the army advanced, and without any important event connected with the regiment, we crossed Tunnel Hill, menaced Buzzard Gap, and finally, by a long circuitous march, passed through Snake Creek Gap and took position before Resaca. On the 16th, Resaca evacuated, the regiment moved with the division down the road leading from Snake [Creek] Gap to Rome. Our advance was uninterrupted until we a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 147 (search)
No. 143. Revort of Lieut. Col. E. Hibbard Topping, one hundred and tenth Illinois Infantry. Hdqrs. 110TH Illinois Infantry Volunteers, Atlanta, Ga., September 6, 1864. Captain: We left McAfee's, March 13, to go to Nashville, Tenn., to guard a wagon train through to the front. Arrived at Nashville, Tenn., March 15, and there remained waiting for the train to be fitted out until May 8, when we started for the front with a train of wagons. May 9, had 1 man wounded by a runaway team. May 11, chased a party of guerrillas near Ferguson's plantation, between Shelbyville and Tullahoma, Tenn. May 26, joined the corps near Dallas, Ga. Continued with the train until June 26, when we were ordered to report with command to division headquarters. Since that time we were part of the time at division headquarters and part of the time with the train until July 20, when we joined the brigade. Our lines were shelled very heavily by the rebels August 5. Very near all the regiment (about
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
e south of the village, where it remained during the night. On the morning of the 8th the division moved south three miles upon the Villanow road, so as to form a connection with the corps of Major-General Hooker and at the same time to cover the right flank of Brigadier-General Johnson, who was swinging forward onto the south end of Tunnel Hill ridge. In the afternoon we crossed that ridge and moved up in support of Brigadier-Generals Johnson and Davis, then in front of Buzzard Roost Gap. May 9, 10, and 11, during these days we remained in our position in reserve, no active operations being carried on in our front. May 12, my division, in advance of the corps, marched at daybreak toward the right, to the support of Major-General McPherson, who had passed his army through Snake Creek Gap and had taken position in Sugar Valley, threatening Resaca. Being detained by the Twentieth Corps in advance of me, I did not get into position until after dark. The other divisions of the Fourte
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Narrative. (search)
e south of the village, where it remained during the night. On the morning of the 8th the division moved south three miles upon the Villanow road, so as to form a connection with the corps of Major-General Hooker and at the same time to cover the right flank of Brigadier-General Johnson, who was swinging forward onto the south end of Tunnel Hill ridge. In the afternoon we crossed that ridge and moved up in support of Brigadier-Generals Johnson and Davis, then in front of Buzzard Roost Gap. May 9, 10, and 11, during these days we remained in our position in reserve, no active operations being carried on in our front. May 12, my division, in advance of the corps, marched at daybreak toward the right, to the support of Major-General McPherson, who had passed his army through Snake Creek Gap and had taken position in Sugar Valley, threatening Resaca. Being detained by the Twentieth Corps in advance of me, I did not get into position until after dark. The other divisions of the Fourte
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 156 (search)
resent position before Atlanta. On the 7th day of May last we started out with the grand army of the Division of the Mississippi, composed of three departments, to wit, the Department of the Cumberland, the Department of the Tennessee, and the Department of the Ohio, to attack the rebel army under command of General Joseph E. Johnston, then occupying the town of Dalton, Ga., strongly intrenched. After some circuitous marches and slight skirmishing with the enemy, on the evening of the 9th of May we arrived in front of Buzzard Roost Gap, some six miles distant from Dalton, which was so strongly fortified that it was deemed imprudent to attempt to take it by storm. On the morning of the 12th we moved with the residue of our corps to a position near Resaca, Ga., by the way of Snake Creek Gap. On the 13th we moved and took position in line of battle to the left of General Johnson's division, of our corps. On the 14th we advanced our lines under a heavy skirmish fire until we reache
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
. At 12 p. m. sent orders to Lieutenant-Colonel Remick, commissary of subsistence, and Lieutenant-Colonel Hayes, quartermaster, to bring up three days rations and forage in the morning from Ringgold. We lost about 15 men killed and wounded in Newton's division during the skirmish on Rocky Face Ridge, and but 3 or 4 in other two divisions. The day was very clear and warm. Troops in good spirits. While on skirmish line this p. m. General Howard's clothes were pierced by a rebel bullet. May 9.-Left headquarters for the front at 6.05 a. m. 7.15, went up on Rocky Face Ridge, and the general ordered skirmish line to advance up the side of the ridge in front, and to keep the attention of the enemy. Went to General Stanley's headquarters at 7.45 a. m., and at that time received note from General Palmer, dated 7.20, stating that he saw a column of troops moving along the crest of Rocky Face north; seemed to be large. Replied that a, demonstration in our front had been ordered, and th
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