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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 458 458 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 70 70 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 37 37 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for May 9th or search for May 9th in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
mpson was there, with about three thousand troops, and Hollins had collected there a considerable flotilla of gun-boats. The siege of Fort Pillow was begun by Foote with his mortar-boats on the 14th of April, and he soon drove Hollins to shelter below the fort. General Pope, whose troops had landed on the Arkansas shore, was unable to co-operate, because the country was overflowed; and, being soon called by Halleck to Shiloh, Foote was left to prosecute the work alone. Finally, on the 9th of May, the painfulness of his ankle, because of the wound received at Fort Donelson, compelled him to leave duty, and he was succeeded in command by Captain C. H. Davis, whose important services with Dupont at Port Royal we have already observed. See page 117. Hollins, meanwhile, had reformed his flotilla, and early in the morning of the 10th May, 1862. he swept around Point Craighead, on the Arkansas shore, with armored steamers. Several of them were fitted with strong bows, plated wit
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 21: slavery and Emancipation.--affairs in the Southwest. (search)
policy to be enforced, excepting with the strong approval of the people. A joint resolution in accordance with the President's views was passed by both houses, This bill was passed by a vote in the House of eighty-nine yeas against thirty-one nays, and in the Senate by thirty-two yeas against ten nays. The President resolved to give the experiment a fair trial. As indicative of that determination, when General Hunter, in command of the Department of the South, issued an order, on the 9th of May following, declaring all the slaves within that department to be thenceforth and forever free, without any apparent military necessity for such an act, the President issued a proclamation reversing the order, and declaring that he reserved to himself the power proposed to be exercised by a commander in the field by such proclamation. This manifesto silenced a great clamor which Hunter's proclamation had raised, and demonstrated the good faith of the Executive toward the slave-holders. and