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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
Cassville. The advance was made rapidly, severe skirmishing ensued, and the enemy driven from his advanced position before night. In this affair Captai-n Lendrum, of the Seventeenth Kentucky Volunteers, a gallant officer, was killed. Captain Hanna, of the Seventyninth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, was severely wounded; many enlisted men were killed and wounded. The brigade bivouacked in the position taken on the 19th day of May during the 20th, 21st, and 22d days of May, 1864. On the 22d day of May the Nineteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteers rejoined the brigade, having been detached since the 4th day of May when near Catoosa SDrings. The brigade marched from the position near Cassville on the 23d day of May. Nothing occurred on the 24th and 25th of May. On the 26th the brigade was placed in support of the First and Second Brigades of this division, who had taken their position near Pumpkin Vine Creek. There was slight skirmishing and some shelling by the enemy during the day, but
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
reat or to destroy it. Reaching the bridge at 4 p. m., I found some of Garrard's cavalry, which had passed me, already there. I formed my lines here so as to cover all approaches and remained until morning, seeing nothing of the enemy. May 20, marched by the Cassville road four miles, passing the Confederate saltpeter works, which I caused to be destroyed by my rear guard, and formed on the right of Baird's division, my left resting on the railroad, my right considerably refused. May 21 and 22, my division lay in bivouac. On the 22d my preparations for the ensuing march were arranged. By stripping my regiment of all baggage, except that which might be carried on the persons of officers or their horses, and sending back the surplus, I was able to provide transportation for the twenty days rations and forage required by the orders of Major-General Sherman. On the 23d I marched, crossing Etowah River at the Island Ford, bivouacked in line and on Euharlee Creek, my left resting immed
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
works at 8 a. m. and passed through General Baird's division, near the creek, and marched on the Rough and Ready road to a point about one mile north of the town and bivouacked for the night. September 8.-The brigade moved at 7 o'clock, taking the advance of the division on the road leading to Atlanta. When within about two miles of the town it took position and went into camp, where it now is. The Second Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry was detached from the brigade, near Kingston, May 22, as a guard for the supply train. July 26, Col. A. G. McCook received orders from department headquarters to report with his regiment to the post commander at Chattanooga, its time having nearly expired. August 29, the Tenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, Capt. J. W. Roby commanding, was ordered to report to the officer in charge of the ordnance department, Marietta, Ga. Appended is a consolidated report of the casualties the brigade has suffered during the Georgia campaign. Zzz
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 124 (search)
the Oostenaula River still in flames. The regiment was ord.ered to report to Major-General Thomas, and was detailed to remain and bury the dead left uncovered upon the battle-field, and to gather in arms and ammunition abandoned. After attending to that part of the business, burying 228 rebels and collecting 1,500 stand of arms, received an order to guard reserve ammunition train of the Department of the Mississippi to Kingston, which was successfully accomplished, arriving there on the 22d of May; then ordered to remain at Kingston for post duty. On the 24th of May the enemy made a dash on a wagon train three miles from Kingston, when the regiment was ordered into line, and skirmishers thrown out to the front,who went forward. The balance of the regiment followed within supporting distance in rear of one section of artillery. The rebels, after destroying about 30 wagons, left hastily, when the regiment returned to their quarters in good order. On the 8th day of June the r
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 129 (search)
nfantry, deployed as skirmishers, drove the enemy's pickets across the Alabama road, and the rebel works were soon occupied by my command, the enemy having crossed the river, destroying the bridge. A battery of the enemy's, stationed on the opposite side of the Coosa River, having opened fire on my line, Captain Barnett's battery reported to me and was soon in a good position, and in a short time silenced that of the enemy. May 19, 20, and 21, remained on the north side of the Coosa River. May 22, Tenth Illinois Infantry were ordered to descend the Oostenaula in pontoon boats to cross the Etowah and take possession of the south side of the Coosa, the enemy's pickets having become troublesome in this direction. This movement was promptly and handsomely executed by this excellent regiment. At 5 p. m. the pontoon bridge having been completed over the Etowah River, the balance of my command moved to the south side of the Coosa, remaining during the 23d. May 24, command moved at 5 a. m.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
enemy one mile north of the Oostenaula River, and a lively fight ensued, both forces using artillery; the Sixteenth was deployed as skirmishers on the right of the road; the enemy fell back to the river; no casualties reported. May 18, at 3 a. m. our lines were advanced; the enemy retreated to the south side of the river, burning the bridges, when the command went into camp on the north bank of the Oostenaula. May 19, 20, 21, in camp near Rome; no changes; nothing important transpiring. May 22, the command marched across the pontoon bridge into Rome, and crossing the Etowah by the same means, encamped on the south bank of Etowah River. May 23, moved camp about one mile south of the river this p. m. May 24, this morning 230 nonveterans, whose term of service has expired, started to Chattanooga in charge of Col. R. F. Smith, the command of the regiment devolving upon Lieut. Col. J. B. Cahill; at 6 a. m. the command marched in a southeast direction, halting for the night at Cave Spri
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 134 (search)
rs on the opposite side. The regiment moved, under cover of a hill, in a piece of woods, while our battery came up on the hill and silenced the enemy. At night our regiment went on picket, where we remained until 2.30 p. m. of May 20, hearing many exciting rumors of Forrest and Wheeler being about to attack our lines, which all proved false. May 20, at 2.30 p. m., being relieved from two days picketing, made camp near Coosa River, being one mile from Rome, which lay on the opposite bank. May 22, at 2.30 p. m. left camp and moved across the Oostenaula River on pontoon bridge into Rome and then across the Etowah River on pontoon-boats, and took position on a high, steep ridge on the south bank of the Coosa River. Distance marched, three miles. May 23, moved camp at 9 a. m. nearly a mile farther from town and made camp in a pine grove, and drew rations of hard bread, which was welcome, for we had been subsisting for several days on corn and oat-meal from the stores captured in Rome,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 170 (search)
Before break of day of the morning of the 16th instant the pickets of our brigade, under charge of Lieutenant-Colonel Wharton, of the Tenth Kentucky Volunteers, were the first to discover the evacuation of their works by the rebels, and the first to occupy them, and, being re-enforced, pushed forward and captured some 60 prisoners without loss. May 17, left Resaca, passing through Adairsville, Calhoun, and Kingston. No events of special importance transpired except that, on the 22d day of May, the Tenth Indiana was detailed to form part of the garrison at Kingston, and rejoined the brigade on the 15th of June. Crossing Pumpkin Vine Creek June 1, and camping in rear of the Twenty-third Army Corps during the night, June 2 took up position on the extreme left of Fourteenth Army Corps. During the 2d, 3d, and 4th days our skirmish lines were during most of the time hotly engaged, although suffering but little loss, owing to the extreme carefulness of officers and men. It was in
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
600 wagons in the corps; 1 wagon allowed corps, division, and brigade headquarters; 150 wagons for ammunition, 3 hospital wagons to a brigade, 6 wagons to accompany the ambulance train, 6 wagons for intrenching tools; the rest of the wagons to have forage and commissary stores for twenty days. Telegrams were sent to Chattanooga for 5,000 shoes to supply the deficiency of the command. 10 p. m., shoes and commissary stores not yet arrived from Chattanooga. Day very warm, dry, and dusty. May 22.-Remained in camp all day receiving and loading supplies in our wagons and getting ready for the march. All sick and wounded and worthless men being sent to the rear. 4 p. m., received orders from Major-General Thomas to march at 8 a. m. tomorrow, following the Twentieth Army Corps, moving on the road from Cassville to Gillem's Bridge, to cross the Etowah River at that place, and to encamp at night on the Euharlee Creek above the Twentieth Corps. 5 p. m., orders were sent, in accordance wi
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 8 (search)
on an engagement in the open field. There was no question in his mind as to whipping his opponent; the only problem was how to get at him. The next morning, May 22, headquarters moved south, following the line which had been taken by Hancock's troops, which ran parallel with the Fredericksburg Railroad. The officers and menelegraph road, and as he had a shorter route than the Union forces, it appears that he reached Hanover Court-house at the head of Ewell's corps at 9:30 o'clock on May 22. His telegrams and maneuvers all go to show that he was entirely deceived in regard to Grant's movements. He reported at that time: I have learned, as yet, not Anna and the South Anna rivers, while Grant was in reality moving toward the North Anna. In these movements Lee was entirely outgeneraled. On the morning of May 22 Hancock was instructed to remain at Milford during the day, while the other corps were directed to move south by roads which would not separate them by distances
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