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the Picayune's pedigree of Gen. Butler. --Under this heading, the Boston Courier publishes, as from the columns of this journal, the following paragraph:-- All the Massachusetts troops now in Washington are negroes, with the exception of two or three drummer-boys. Gen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readers may recollect old Ben, the barber, who kept a shop in Poydras street, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. And the Newburyport (Mass.) Herald does the same. We can scarcely imagine that the editors of either of those journals really believe that this paragraph was ever before printed in the Picayune. At all events, it never was.--N. O. Picayune, May 22.
May 22.--I Nashville, Tenn., while secession banners wave from every other building, both public and private, one heroic lady (Mrs. McEwin) has placed the National Flag on her house, and says she will shoot whoever attempts to tear down the glorious old Stars and Stripes. Let her name be engraved on the hearts of all loyal Americans.--Louisvile Journal.
Doc. 51.-a ten days cavalry scout. Report of Colonel Richard rush. headquarters Sixth Pennsylvania cavalry, New-Bridge, Va., May 31, 1862. I have the honor to report to you, as the Military Agent of the State of Pennsylvania, the active duty my regiment has been doing, knowing you would like to know what all your Pennsylvania regiments in the Army of the Potomac are doing in the way of active service. We were detached from the reserve brigade of cavalry, on the twenty-second May, by the order of General McClellan, to make a reconnoissance around and about the Pamunkey River, from Piping Tree Ferry to Hanover Town Ferry. We had three squadrons on picket at these ferries, and the balance of the regiment was used for scouting. We found on the twenty-third instant, the enemy were very strong at Hanover Court-House, and instantly sent word to Gen. Porter. Upon which information Gen. Porter ordered us to destroy all the ferries and bridges along the Pamunkey, which t
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 61.-operations of a rebel gunboat. (search)
Doc. 61.-operations of a rebel gunboat. The following is the report of Captain Fry to Major-General Hindman, detailing his operations on the White River from May twenty-second to June sixth. C. S. Gunboat Maurepas, Des Arc, Ark., June 6. General: I arrived at this place on the twenty-second ultimo, with a crew of less than ten men, exclusive of my firemen and coal-passers. It was absolutely necessary, if I proposed doing anything besides frightening the enemy, that I should have the cooperation of a land force, which, despite all my efforts, I was unable to obtain. One or two companies of cavalry would have sufficed if I could get no more; but the first colonel I could hear from concluded I was under his command, and ordered me to stay where I was until further orders. This order, of course, I disregarded; as, according to my judgment, no man under the rank of a Brigadier-General can possibly form a correct judgment of the contingencies governing the movements of a gunboat
fences Vicksburgh, Miss., May 18, 1862. S. Phillips Lee, U. S.N., Commanding Advance Naval Division: sir: Your communication of this date, addressed To the authorities of Vicksburgh, demanding the surrender of the city and its defences, has been received. In regard to the surrender of the defences, I have to reply that having been ordered here to hold these defences, it is my intention to do so as long as it is in my power. M. L. Smith, Brigadier-General Commanding --Mobile Advertiser, May 22. Doc. 112.-a case of rebel treachery. Firing upon a flag of truce, May 19. The following particulars are given by the Fortress Monroe correspondent of the Baltimore American: Another bad affair has occurred on the James River, resulting in the loss of a whole boat's crew and several officers of the gunboat Wachusett. It appears that on Saturday last, when the fleet, consisting of the Wachusett, Captain Smith, the Monitor, the Galena, the Port Royal, and Aroostook, anchored off C
s of Vicksburgh, and that you may have a full reply to said communication, I have to state that Mississippians don't know and refuse to learn how to surrender to an enemy. If Commodore Farragut or Brig.-Gen. Butler can teach them, let them come and try. As to the defences of Vicksburgh, I respectfully refer you to the reply of Brigadier-General Smith, commanding forces at Vicksburgh, herewith enclosed. Respectfully, James L. Autry, Military Governor and Commandant Post. headquarters defences Vicksburgh, Miss., May 18, 1862. S. Phillips Lee, U. S.N., Commanding Advance Naval Division: sir: Your communication of this date, addressed To the authorities of Vicksburgh, demanding the surrender of the city and its defences, has been received. In regard to the surrender of the defences, I have to reply that having been ordered here to hold these defences, it is my intention to do so as long as it is in my power. M. L. Smith, Brigadier-General Commanding --Mobile Advertiser, May 22.
. Under these circumstances, General Grant deternmined to attempt to carry the place by assault. Two unsuccessful attacks were made on the nineteenth and twenty-second of May; but as reenforcements reached him a few days after, sufficiently large to enable him to completely invest the rebel defences, he resorted to the slower bu the enemy's communications. After heavy losses in skirmishes with Forrest's cavalry, and when near its destination, he was forced to surrender. On the twenty-second of May, Major-General Stanley made a raid upon Middleton, capturing eighty prisoners, three hundred horses, six hundred stand of arms, and other property. On tvide or to which they are applicable. Finding that the rebel authorities were feeding prisoners contrary to these stipulations, they were notified, on the twenty-second of May last, that all paroles not given in the manner prescribed by the cartel, would be regarded as null and void. Nevertheless they continued to extort, by thr
Doc. 196.-fight near Fort Gibson, Ark. Colonel Philips's report. headquarters, Indian territory and Western Arkansas, Fort Blunt, Cherokee Nation, May 22. Major-General James G. Blunt: sir: I have the honor to report to you a somewhat severe engagement with the enemy on the twentieth instant. I had eight hundred (800) mounted men guarding my supply line, to cover approaching trains, when the enemy, in the night, crossed the Arkanas River with five regiments, going a mountain road. A scout I had sent, failing to do his duty, left that road unwatched, and they approached within five miles of me, getting me on the left flank. They were, however, afraid to attack me in the works, and taking a strong position on the mountains on the south, five miles distant, and close to the Arkansas River, tried to cut off the stock. As all had been reported quiet for twenty (20) miles in all directions this side of the river, the stock was, therefore, being sent out to graze, when the
Doc. 199.-expedition to Gum swamp, N. C. General Foster's report. headquarters Tenth army corps, Newbern, N. C., June 2, 1863. Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief United States Army, Washington, D. C: General: Referring to my brief report of May twenty-second, I have the honor to report that, learning from Colonel J. Richter Jones, commanding outposts, that he deemed it possible to capture the enemy's outpost regiments at Gum Swamps, eight miles from Kinston, I ordered Colonel Lee's brigade, consisting of the Fifth, Twenty-fifth, and Forty-sixth Massachusetts regiments, three pieces of Boggs's battery, and a battalion of cavalry, to report to him. Colonel Jones ordered the Fifth, Twenty-fifth, and Forty-sixth, with the artillery and cavalry, under the command of Colonel Pierson, Fifth Massachusetts, to advance up the railroad and Dover road, to attack the enemy's work in front, while the Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania volunteers, and the Twenty-seventh Massachusetts vo
Confederate Impressments. Mr. T. E. Chambliss, of a south-side county, believing that much injury has been done our cause by injudicious impressments, addressed a letter to Gen. Lee on the subject, and received the following reply: headquarters, Richmond, May 22. T. E. Chambliss, Esq., Petersburgh: sir: Your letter of the twentieth inst., is received. I am opposed to the whole system of impressment, and endeavor to put a stop to it as far as I am able, and prefer relying on the patriotism and zeal of our citizens. Officers of the army say that it is sometimes absolutely necessary to resort to it, in cases of great emergency. I shall forward your letter to General Huger, commanding the department embracing the counties enumerated in your letter, and request him to prevent impressment from being resorted to, except in cases of necessity, and also to take precautions against any undue interference with the agricultural operations of the people. I hope you will do all in
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