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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 524 524 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 46 46 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 10 10 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 9 9 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for June 5th or search for June 5th in all documents.

Your search returned 46 results in 44 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
this he could find his way back to his original base, or from about Gordonsville join this army. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. General Hunter immediately took up the offensive, and moving up the Shenandoah Valley, met the enemy on the 5th of June at Piedmont, and after a battle of ten hours routed and defeated him, capturing on the field of battle 1,500 men) 3 pieces of artillery, and 300 stand of small-arms. On the 8th of the same month he formed a junction with Crook and Averell at . Before starting General A. J. Smith's troops back to Sherman, General Canby sent a part of it to disperse a force of the enemy that was collecting near the Mississippi River. General Smith met and defeated this force near Lake Chicot on the 5th of June. Our loss was about 40 killed and 70 wounded. In the latter part of July General Canby sent Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger, with such forces as he could collect, to co-operate with Admiral Farragut against the defenses of Mobile Bay. On the 8th of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
property and ammunition expended. I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Geo. H. Thomas, Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding. Lieut. Col. R. M. Sawyer. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Mil. Div. of the Mississippi. Inclosure no. 1. List of casualties in the Army of the Cumberland during the month of May. Corps.Killed.Wounded.Missing.Aggregate. Officers.MenOfficers.MenOfficers.Men Fourteenth Army Corps14210541,1002751,455 Twentieth Army Corps223871272,88024993,917 Fourth Army Corps304931202,47142843,402 Total661,0903016,45188588,774 The report of the Fourth Army Corps is to June 5. Of the 284 missing, 255 are from General Wood's division and were lost at Pickett's Mills, May 27. General Wood says: I am fully satisfied that nearly the whole of them were either killed outright on the field, or were wounded and could not be brought away, and fell into the hands of the enemy. Geo. H. Thomas, Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
vement was continued; the Twentieth and Twenty-third Corps and part of the Fourteenth passed beyond our extreme left. June 3 and 4, nothing of consequence, excepting that I thinned and extended my lines so as to cover the ground occupied by the Twenty-third Corps, and afterward by Davis' division, of the Fourteenth Corps, relieving those troops in order to prolong our lines to the left. The result of these movements was to cause the enemy to abandon his lines on the night of June 4. June 5, the command rested. June 6, marched toward Acworth, crossing Allatoona Creek, and massed the command near Dr. Peters' house, on the Acworth and Sandtown road, about two miles from Acworth, which was already in possession of our troops. June 7, 8, and 9, all that was done by the entire army was establishing the depots at Allatoona, rebuilding the bridge across the Etowah, and bringing up supplies. June 10, movements were resumed. The Fourth Corps was directed to follow the Fourt
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
al Hooker's corps, which had come up with and had a severe engagement with the rebels. These re-enforcements did not arrive any too soon, though night had intervened between the enemy and General Hooker's disordered troops. We went into line of battle at night and lay in this position. May 26, remained in this position. May 27, moved across Little Pumpkin Vine Creek near Brown's saw-mill, relieving the Second Brigade, of General Wood's division. At this point we remained until the 5th of June, working day and night, in rain and mud, under heavy fire. Severe skirmishing took place night and day with but little intermission, varied every day by heavy artillery firing. This position was most fiercely contested, yet day and night my officers and men for ten days worked and fought until we advanced our lines to pistol-shot range at some points of the enemy's works. Here the fire was so heavy and concentrated that no human being could show above the works for any length of time w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
wounded. May 30, still occupy the same works; nothing but the usual skirmish firing; 1 man wounded. May 31, still in the same works; very heavy skirmishing, but no general engagement. June 1, moved before daylight this morning one mile to the left, and relieved a part of General Whitaker's brigade. June 2, held the same position during day and night. June 3, still in same works. June 4, moved onehalf mile to the left, and relieved one of General Whitaker's regiments on the front line. June 5, the enemy evacuated our front early this morning, our skirmishers occupying their works; we moved over the works and encamped for the night. June 6, marched at 6 a. m. in direction of the railroad, and encamped about three miles from Acworth. June 7, cleaned up camp and arranged tents in proper order. June 8, still in camp; nothing of importance transpired. June 9, remained quiet in camp all day and night. June 10, struck tents at 6 a. m. and marched about three miles in a southerly di
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 33 (search)
ood's division, my regiment occupying position in rear line. Skirmishing was heavy, in which one of my companies was engaged, at 7 a. m. Next morning the line was advanced some fifty yards and built works, where we remained until June 1. I then moved to left, agreeably to orders, and relieved the Twenty-first Kentucky on the front line, a detail of one commissioned officer and fifty men was sent on picket, relieving the pickets of that regiment. Here I remained until the morning of the 5th of June; the enemy having evacuated his position, I was ordered to occupy his works. On the morning of the 6th I moved with brigade about eight miles to near Acworth, and went into camp. On June 10 I again moved and took position in the line. Nothing occurred, however, in which I had part until the 15th. We moved upon the hill in our front, the enemy having evacuated, heavy cannonading was going on on both flanks, but our front was but slightly engaged. At night we moved to right and took po
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
lties of this regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Wednesday, June 1, the position of the regiment was still unchanged. The loss on this day was 1 enlisted man killed. On Thursday, June 2, no change of position took place; casualties of the regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Friday, June 3, in the same position as on the 2d; casualties of the regiment, 2 enlisted men wounded. On Saturday, June 4, moved camp at daylight to the left, the rebels having retreated during the night. On Sunday, June 5, the regiment lay quietly in camp all day. On Monday, June 6, the regiment marched at 5 a. m. a distance of about six miles to near Acworth Station. The regiment lay in camp during the 7th, 8th, and 9th. On Friday, June 10, the regiment left camp at 7 a. m., and marched four miles and encamped near Pine Knob, or Pine Top, near the enemy, our regiment on the second line, and was not engaged with the enemy. On Saturday and Sunday, 11th and 12th of June, the regiment still lay in camp on
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
battery (A, First Ohio) on the right of my line, relieving one of General Stanley's batteries posted there. From this date until the evacuation of the enemy on the night of June 4 there was continual skirmishing and demonstrations on my line. We lost many men in these operations by sharpshooters, and from the fact that our camps were exposed to the enemy's fire. It was a period of unprecedented fatigue and watchfulness on the part of officers and men, the behavior of whom was admirable. June 5, remained in the same position. June 6, marched to Morris' Hill Church, bringing up the rear of the corps, and leaving Kimball's brigade behind to guard and bring up the corps hospitals. June 7, General Kimball having performed this duty, rejoined the division. He had several skirmishes with the enemy's cavalry. June 8 and 9, remained in camp. June 10, marched to a position in front of Pine Mountain, taking position to the right and rear of General Stanley's division. June 11, 12, 13,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
position near my right. At 3.30 o'clock the enemy made a charge, driving my skirmishers to their reserves, but was by them checked and repulsed with severe loss. After his repulse the enemy demonstrated strongly until 5.30 p. m., undoubtedly with a view to cover a movement of troops to his right, which movement was at that time discovered to be going on. His demonstrations ceased about the time of the attack of General Wood's (Third) division to our left. From the 27th of May until the 5th of June, when the enemy disappeared from the (our) front, I remained in my advanced position, skirmishing hotly and continually with him day and night; in fact the affair more resembled a continuous battle than a skirmish. On the 6th of June I was ordered by you to cover with my brigade the movement of the corps hospitals, and in compliance bivouacked that night near Brown's Mill creek. On the 8th, the movement of the hospitals being completed, my command joined the division at Allatoona Creek,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
of works, where we lay for the night. There was constant skirmishing all day, our loss being 2 enlisted men killed. May 31, at sundown moved out to front line of works, where we lay all night. June 1, lay in front line all day; at dark were relieved and moved to rear, where lay for the night. June 2, lay still all day; 1 man wounded. June 3, at dark moved out to front line of works. June 4, entire division was relieved at dark and regiment moved one mile to rear and lay for the night. June 5, rebels evacuated their works during the past night. Regiment changed front and built works. June 6, at 5 a. m. moved two miles to rear to escort hospital trains Rejoined brigade at 7 a. m. Marched at 8 a. m. At 2 p. m. brigade halted and regiment went on picket. June 7, skirmished with rebel cavalry, capturing 8 prisoners. No loss in regiment. June 8, moved at 7 a. m., rejoining the division at 2 p. m. and camping four miles from Acworth. June 9, lay in camp. June 10, marched at 7 a.
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