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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 489 489 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 166 166 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 164 164 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 63 63 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 63 63 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 56 56 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 30 30 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 30 30 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for July or search for July in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
were in easy communication with Morris Island. The island itself had at its north end the Cumming's Point battery, and it was completely crossed from sea to marsh by Battery Wagner, that strong work which the army attempted to carry by assault in July, and from which it was repulsed with great slaughter. The inland side of Morris Island is in some measure protected from a naval fire by sand dunes and ridges forming in places a natural parapet; and when General Hunter, on the 8th of April, pr Confederate troops, in force three times greater than his, passing to the island by their well-protected interior lines, might have overwhelmed the Union troops by their superior numbers, and have captured them, or driven them to their ships. In July, when General Gillmore, who on the 12th of June had succeeded General Hunter, executed his very skillful and well-arranged movement upon Morris Island, the thirty thousand troops who were present in April, and had witnessed Admiral Du Pont's attac
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
of his headquarters flag, and a golden eagle in a silver wreath as the emblem, the latter having been in use as a badge for headquarters aides. It was a showy standard, and A. R. Waud, the war artist, remembers that General Grant, when he first saw it unfurled, as they broke camp for the Wilderness campaign, exclaimed: what's this!--is Imperial Caesar anywhere about here?--editors. This incident gave me even a more favorable opinion of Meade than did his great victory at Gettysburg the July before. It is men who wait to be selected, and not those who seek, from whom we may always expect the most efficient service. Meade's position afterward proved embarrassing to me if not to him. For nearly a year previous to my taking command of all the armies he had been at the head of the Army of the Potomac, commanding an army independently. All other general officers occupying similar positions were independent in their commands so far as any one present with them was concerned. I tr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
Hunter; C, 1st Mo. (at Allatoona and Kenesaw), Capt. John L. Matthaei; 10th Ohio (at Kenesaw from July llth), Capt. Francis Seaman; 15th Ohio, Lieut. James Burdick. Army of the Ohio (Twenty-third Curne, Brig.-Gen. M. P. Lowrey. Escort, Capt. C. F. Sanders. Polk's Brigade, Broken up in July and regiments assigned to other brigades. Brig.-Gen. Lucius E. Polk: 1st and 15th Ark., Col. J. WCol. Richard Harrison. Scott's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas M. Scott: 27th Ala., Consolidated in July, under Col. S. S. Ives. Col. James Jackson, Lieut.-Col. E. McAlexander; 35th Ala., Consolidated in July, under Col. S. S. Ives. Col. S. S. Ives; 49th Ala., Consolidated in July, under Col. S. S. Ives. Lieut.-Col. J. D. Weeden, Capt. W. B. Beeson; 55th Ala., Col. John Snodgrass, Maj. J. B. DJuly, under Col. S. S. Ives. Lieut.-Col. J. D. Weeden, Capt. W. B. Beeson; 55th Ala., Col. John Snodgrass, Maj. J. B. Dickey; 57th Ala., Col. C. J. L. Cuningham, Lieut.-Col. W. C. Bethune, Capt. A. L. Milligan, Maj. J. H. Wiley; 12th La., Col. N. L. Nelson, Capt. E. McN. Graham. French's division, Maj.-Gen. Samuel
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
leck, July 23d, 30th, and August 1st, 1863. And see General Grant's article, Vol. III., p. 679, of this work. and Admiral Farragut, and thus lending an effective support to the main operations about Chattanooga at a critical period, were occupied in attempting to carry out the orders of the Government to restore the flag in Texas. General Banks was informed by General Halleck that the Government fully appreciated the importance of the proposed operations against Mobile, Halleck to Banks, July 24th, August 6th, 10th, and 12th. There is some reason for thinking that the idea may have originated with President Lincoln himself: see Lincoln to Stanton, July 29th, 1863. but there were important reasons, reasons other than military, why the Texas movement should be made first and with the least possible delay, by sea or land. A combined naval and military operation by the Red River was indicated as the best mode of carrying out the object; the selection of the route was, however, left
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in Arkansas, April 20, 1864. (search)
Ark., Lieut.-Col. H. G. P. William; 20th Ark.,----; Ark. Battalion,----. Crawford's Brigade, Col. W. A. Crawford: 2d Ark., Capt. O. B. Tebbs; Crawford's Reg't,----; Wright's Reg't, Col. John C. Wright; Poe's Battalion, Maj. J. T. Poe; Ark. Battalion, Maj. E . L. McMurtrey. Artillery: Ark. Battery, Capt. W. M. Hughey. Marmaduke's cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. John S. Marmaduke. Greene's Brigade, Col. Colton Greene: 3d Mo., Lieut.-Col. L. A. Campbell; 4th Mo., Lieut.-Col. W. J. Preston; 7th Mo.,----; 8th Mo., Col. W. L. Jeffers; 10th Mo., Col. R. R. Leather; Mo. Battery, Capt.----Harris. Shelby's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph O. Shelby: 1st Mo., Battalion, Maj. Benjamin Elliott; 5th Mo., Col. B. F. Gordon; 11th Mo., Col. M . W. Smith; 12th Mo., Col. David Shanks; Hunter's Reg't, Col. D. C. Hunter; Mo. Battery, Capt. R. A. Collins. Maxey's cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. Saml. B. Maxey. Gano's Brigade, Col. Charles De Morse: 29th Tex., Maj. J. A. Carroll; 30th Tex., Lieut.-Col. N.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cavalry operations in the West under Rosecrans and Sherman. (search)
Meridian railroads. This bold and successful raid produced Map of operations in middle Tennessee and North Alabama, 1863-5. a profound sensation, and was of great benefit to General Grant in the Vicksburg campaign. The great activity of the Union cavalry at this period is further shown by the fact that General Stanley in the month of June led a strong force in rear of Bragg's position at Tullahoma, cutting the railroads at Decherd Station, whereupon Bragg fell back to Bridgeport. In July Stanley again made a movement upon Huntsville. Proceeding by several roads, the separate brigades of General J. B. Turchin and Colonels Eli Long and Robert Galbraith all reached Huntsville, Alabama, and, after capturing prisoners, supplies, and stock, returned without serious loss. The Confederates on their part also made a celebrated raid at this time. On the 27th of June Morgan crossed the Cumberland River at Burksville, Kentucky, with about 2500 men. He passed northwardly through Colu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of the Petersburg crater. (search)
eft lateral gallery was thirty-seven feet in length and the right lateral thirty-eight feet. The magazines, eight in number, were placed in the lateral galleries--two at each end a few feet apart in branches at nearly right angles to the side galleries, and two more in each of the side galleries similarly placed by pairs, situated equidistant from each other and the end of the galleries. It had been the intention of General Grant to make an assault on the enemy's works in the early part of July; but the movement was deferred in consequence of the work on the mine, the completion of which was impatiently awaited. As a diversion Hancock's corps and two divisions of cavalry had crossed to the north side of the James at Deep Bottom and had threatened Richmond. A part of Lee's army was sent from Petersburg to checkmate this move, and when the mine was ready to be sprung Hancock was recalled in haste to Petersburg. When the mine was ready for the explosives General Meade requested Gene
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
ne to December, 1864, was as follows: date.Cavalry.Artillery. Infantry.Total. June 30th14,0448,005 85,370107,419 July 31st8,5598,952 59,81077,321 August 31st5,8277,200 45,89658,923 September 30th6,7998,85861,118 76,775 October 31st 6,2957,50871,24385,046 November 30th 8,5547,96470,20586,723 December 31st9,974 9,58290,808110,364 The total losses from June 15th to December 31st, 1864, were as follows: month.Killed.Wounded. Captured or Missing.Total. June2,0139,9354,62116,569 July9153,8081,6446,367 August8764,1515,96910,996 September6443,5032,8717,018 October5282,9462,0945,568 November57258108423 December66278269613 Aggregate5,09924,87917,57647,554 The Confederate Army. some of the regimental and battery commanders mentioned were not in actual command on December 31st. General Robert E. Lee. Provost Guard, etc.: 1st Va. Batt'n, Maj. D. ]:. Bridgford; 39th Va. Batt'n Cav., Maj. John H. Richardson. Engineer Troops: 1st Reg't, Col. T. M. R. Talcott. fi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate cruisers. (search)
the privateers, was the Sumter. This steamer, formerly the Habana, of the New Orleans and Havana line, was altered into a ship-of-war in April and May, 1861, and, under the command of Captain Raphael Semmes, escaped from the Mississippi early in July, after an unsuccessful chase by the Brooklyn, which was at the time blockading the mouth of the river. Her cruise lasted six months, during which she made fifteen prizes. Of these seven were destroyed, one was ransomed, one recaptured, and the rs believed that the French emperor would place no obstacle in the way of Confederate operations in France. A contract was therefore made with Arman, an influential ship-builder, of Bordeaux, early in 1863, for four corvettes, and in the following July for two powerful iron-clad rams, each carrying a 300-pounder Armstrong rifle in a casemate and two 70-pounders in a turret. Before the work was far advanced, however,--that is, in September, 1863,--the United States Minister, Mr. Dayton, was info
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
operations and means of communication, General Grant had determined that he would not take the chances of a naval contest for its control, and he had previously ordered General Butler to procure and sink a number of hulks in the channel at Trent's Reach. The obstructions were put in position between the 15th and 18th of June, and the operations of the fleet for the remainder of the summer were confined to desultory engagements with batteries at various points along the base of the army. In July and August these engagements occurred with great frequency. Once on the 21st of June, soon after the sinking of the obstructions, the Confederate squadron came down below Dutch Gap, and in conjunction with the battery at Howlett's made an ineffectual demonstration — the only occasion during the year 1864 on which they were brought into action. During the summer and fall the iron-clads were gradually withdrawn, with the exception of the Onondaga, a double-turreted monitor carrying two 15-inc