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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 114 (search)
s south of it camped near the line of railroad. After sunset, built works on a height overlooking the enemy's position. On the forenoon of the 4th of July one-half of the battalion was directed to support Prescott's battery, the other half was placed on the picketline, the whole being under a heavy fire until sunset. On the 5th marched at 6 a. m. in pursuit of the enemy on road running parallel with line of railroad; encamped about one and a half miles from the Chattahoochee River. On 8th of July moved to the right into position on the left of Davis' division. On the 16th the battalion was on picket duty on the river. On 17th, at 5 p. m., marched one and a half miles to the left as rear guard of division train to Pace's Ferry. Crossed Chattahoochee next day, and joined the brigade. On 20th crossed Peach Tree Creek, and about 4 p. m. threw up breast-works under a heavy fire from the rebel artillery, and about sunset was marched four miles to the left to fill a gap between Fourt
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 117 (search)
gain marched in pursuit and overtook the enemy about four miles south of Marietta, where it was held in reserve during the action of July 4. July 5, the regiment marched in pursuit of the enemy, who had retreated the evening before, and came up with them in the evening of the same day in the vicinity of the Chattahoochee River. About 5 p. m. the regiment moved to the front, formed line of battle, and erected TIlE Atlanta CAMPAIGtNI, temporary fortifications, where it laid under fire until July 8, when it was moved to the rear and placed in reserve, and acted as such until July 10, when the rebels retreated. From July 10 until July 17 the regiment laid in camp. On the day last named the regiment broke camp and marched to the left; crossed the Chattahoochee River at Pace's Ferry. About 3 p. m. the regiment formed line of battle and commenced slowly advancing, skirmishing and slowly driving the rebels. July 18 and 19, skirmishing and advancing continued. July 20, the regiment was
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
iment lost 1 killed, 7 wounded, I missing. July 5, the enemy again fell back last night, and this morning the command moved forward to near Vining's Station, where the enemy was found in an intrenched position; some skirmishing in our front this p. m.; no casualties in the regiment. July 6, the lines were advanced some distance this a. m., which occasioned sharp firing in our front all day. July 7, the regiment relieved the Fourteenth Michigan on the skirmish line, and lost 3 men wounded. July 8 to 16, in camp near Vining's Station; no casualties to report, and almost a suspension of hostilities, the enemy having withdrawn to the east bank of the Chattahoochee. July 17, pursuant to orders, the regiment marched from its encampment near Vining's Station to Pace's Ferry, where, crossing the Chattahoochee and proceeding to Nancy's Creek, it being in advance, encountered the enemy; in the fight which ensued First Lieut. James Donaldson, Company C, Corpls. Alex. Peterson, Company F, and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
ion (Fourteenth Army Corps) column, which, taking a shorter road, was coming in on my right and reached the railroad in front of me. These troops immediately abutted upon the strong rebel works on the road, a part of the continuous line constituting the tete-de-pont of the railroad crossing. My troops were then formed, by direction of the major-general commanding the corps, so as to connect with the left of the First Division, and extending back along the line of the railroad. July 6, 7, and 8, during these days, while other portions of the army were working themselves into position, this division remained stationary, the skirmish lines alone keeping up a constant and continuous fire from their pits. July 9, having received orders to push out my skirmishers and feel the enemy for the purpose of developing his position I caused Colonel Este, whose brigade was the most advanced, to deploy a heavy line, and, supporting it by a regiment, directed him to make the advance required. I at
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
ion (Fourteenth Army Corps) column, which, taking a shorter road, was coming in on my right and reached the railroad in front of me. These troops immediately abutted upon the strong rebel works on the road, a part of the continuous line constituting the tete-de-pont of the railroad crossing. My troops were then formed, by direction of the major-general commanding the corps, so as to connect with the left of the First Division, and extending back along the line of the railroad. July 6, 7, and 8, during these days, while other portions of the army were working themselves into position, this division remained stationary, the skirmish lines alone keeping up a constant and continuous fire from their pits. July 9, having received orders to push out my skirmishers and feel the enemy for the purpose of developing his position I caused Colonel Este, whose brigade was the most advanced, to deploy a heavy line, and, supporting it by a regiment, directed him to make the advance required. I at
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
al sent back General Thomas' communication, stating that he did not understand it, as said bridge is uninjured, and Roswell Factory, the place for Schofield to cross, is between fifteen and twenty miles from here; also the hour of sending his dispatch not mentioned, but he had ordered General Newton to send the regiment, as directed, at daylight to-morrow. Day very hot. Skirmishing qnd picket-firing along the bank of the river through the days Loss to-day in killed and wounded about 15. July 8.-2 a. m., received reply from General Thomas to General Howard's indorsement on his note, returned at 11.30 p. m., which was merely a copy of Major-General Sherman's note to him (General T[homas]), as follows: headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, July 7, 1864. By direction of the major-general commanding, please order your pontoon train party, with bridge, to report to Schofield, near the mouth of Soap Creek, as early to-morrow as possible; also direct General Howard to sen
e mounted in his intrenchments. Under these circumstances it was inexpedient to attack him; and our troops, who had been marching and fighting almost incessantly for seven days, under the most trying circumstances, were withdrawn in order to afford them the repose of which they stood so much in need. Several days were spent in collecting arms and other property abandoned by the enemy, and, in the meantime, some artillery and cavalry were sent below Westover to annoy his transports. On July 8th, our army returned to the vicinity of Richmond. The siege of Richmond was raised, and the object of a campaign which had been prosecuted after months of preparation, at an enormous expenditure of men and money, was completely frustrated. General Lee was now gaining fast the confidence of all classes; he had possessed that of the President always. The Richmond Dispatch of July 19, 1862, said, The rise which this officer has suddenly taken in the public confidence is without a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Steuart's brigade at the battle of Gettysburg.--a narrative by Rev. Randolph H. McKim, D. D., late First Lieutenant and Aide-de-camp, Confederate army. (search)
rly to statistics in his possession. The Second Maryland lost, according to my notes, 206 men. Other estimates (by Colonel Herbert and Major Goldsborough) put their loss, one at 250, the other at 222. One company, that of the lamented William II. Murray, carried into battle 92 men, and lost 18 killed, 37 wounded, total 55. Another estimate (by the orderly sergeant of Company A) puts it at 62. My diary states that the brigade mustered about 2,200 before the battle. At Hagerstown, on the 8th July, about 1,200 men reported for duty. It is probable that others subsequently came in, as I cannot think the loss was so high as 1,000 men, in the face of the following entry in my diary July 4: Total loss in the brigade (killed, wounded, and missing) 680. There were probably many stragglers on the march to Williamsport, some of whom may have been taken prisoners; but many no doubt afterwards came in. Perhaps the entire loss might be put at 800. What a field was this! For three hours
ed bridge, had a decided advantage, and from their position poured a galling fire upon the Federal companies on this side, which were perfectly exposed: yet they stood their ground with almost reckless bravery, until the firing ceased from the opposite side, when they retired with a loss of two killed and three wounded. Several of the rebels were killed, one was killed by a citizen of Harper's Ferry, who engaged in the fight, he being driven from the place by the rebels.--Baltimore American, July 8. The rebels erected a battery, and mounted two rifled cannon at Matthias Point, Va.--N. Y. Times, July 6. The New Hampshire Legislature adjourned to-day, after a session of thirty days. Resolutions were reported, declaring the war now in progress a war solely for the maintenance of the Government and the suppression of rebellion; declaring against the right of secession; asserting that neither the President nor Congress can constitutionally entertain any proposition which has for i
Hoffman.--National Intelligencer, July 9. Mr. Vallandigham, of Ohio, visited, this afternoon, the Ohio encampments in Virginia, and was greeted with the sight of a hanging effigy, bearing the inscription: Vallandigham, the traitor. When he approached the Second Ohio Regiment, he was saluted by a discharge of stones, and, on the interposition of the officers, they were also pelted, until it amounted almost to a riot. He was finally released from his unpleasant position.--N. Y. Tribune, July 8. Very impressive and interesting services took place in the Church of the Messiah in New York this evening. The exercises were chosen with special reference to their fitness for the first Sunday after National Independence. The services began with Collins' Requiem of Heroes: How sleep the brave who sink to rest, By all their country's wishes blest! Then followed the xlviith Psalm, slightly modified, the minister reading a verse and the congregation responding with the alternat
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