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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Xxviii. (search)
Xxviii. In Barrett's biography of Mr. Lincoln, it is stated that the first draft of the Emancipation Proclamation was written on board of the steamboat returning from his 8th of July visit to the army at Harrison's Landing. This circumstance was not included in the statement given me, and to others in my presence, at different times; but from the known relations of the author with the President, it is undoubtedly true. The original draft was written upon one side of four half sheets of official foolscap. He flung down upon the table one day for me, several sheets of the same, saying, There, I believe, is some of the very paper which was used; if not, it was, at any rate, just like it. The original draft is dated September 22d, 1863, and was presented to the Army Relief Bazaar, at Albany, N. Y., in 1864. It is in the proper handwriting of Mr. Lincoln, excepting two interlineations in pencil, by Secretary Seward, and the formal heading and ending, which were written by the ch
a new levy of three hundred thousand, which I accept. And in another letter, two days later: To reinforce you so as to enable you to resume the offensive within a month, or even six weeks, is impossible. . Under these circumstances, the defensive for the present must be your only care. Save the army-first, where you are, if you can; secondly, by removal, if you must. To satisfy himself more fully about the actual situation, the President made a visit to Harrison's Landing on July 8 and 9, and held personal interviews with McClellan and his leading generals. While the question of removing the army underwent considerable discussion, the President left it undecided for the present; but on July i , soon after his return to Washington, he issued an order: That Major-General Henry W. Halleck be assigned to command the whole land forces of the United States, as general-in-chief, and that he repair to this capital so soon as he can with safety to the positions and ope
can \do harm. They have never been friendly to me. At all events, I must keep some consciousness of being somewhere near right. I must keep some standard or principle fixed within myself. Convinced, after fullest deliberation, that the bill was too restrictive in its provisions, and yet unwilling to reject whatever of practical good might be accomplished by it, he disregarded precedents, and acting on his lifelong rule of taking the people into his confidence, issued a proclamation on July 8, giving a copy of the bill of Congress, reciting the circumstances under which it was passed, and announcing that while he was unprepared by formal approval of the bill to be inflexibly committed to any single plan of restoration, or to set aside the free-State governments already adopted in Arkansas and Louisiana, or to declare that Congress was competent to decree the abolishment of slavery; yet he was fully satisfied with the plan as one very proper method of reconstruction, and promised
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
at right angles to the abovenamed road, and one-quarter of a mile from the station. He quickly drove the enemy from his barricades and pushed on to the river, where he arrived in time to save a greater part of the enemy's bridge. The dismounted cavalry seemed to have retreated by a river road, that we did not then know, toward the railroad bridge, and therefore escaped capture. This accomplished, the command went into camp on the high ground near to and facing the river. July 6, 7, and 8, remained in position, making an occasional demonstration and feint as if to throw a bridge, with a view to keep as large a force of the enemy on the opposite bank as possible. July 9, in accordance with instructions from department headquarters, General Newton's division was sent to Roswell Factory to support General Garrard's cavalry in effecting a crossing of the Chattahoochee at that point. He crossed and made a bridge-head. July 10, Stanley's and Wood's divisions moved to near th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
dark, and worked all night on the works partially constructed by them. Our loss during the day was 1 officer and 9 privates wounded. July 5, the enemy evacuated our front during the night. We followed them closely to the Chattahoochee River, where they again made a stand. We took position on a hill overlooking the river and encamped for the night. July 6, remained in camp all day; nothing transpired in our front. July 7, arranged camp in proper order and prepared for a few days' rest. July 8, still resting quietly in camp; moved about three miles up the river. July 9, 10, and II, remained quietly in camp. July 12, moved across and some two miles down the Chattahoochee River, and again went into camp, our right resting on the river and running at right angles with it. Built a line of log works in front of the regiment. July 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, lay quietly in camp in same position. July 18, left camp at 6 a. m. and marched five miles in a southeasterly direction, when we e
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
ich had encountered the enemy there. July 4, moved forward and formed on the left of General Stanley, who had advanced his skirmish and main lines, took some of the enemy's rifle-pits and captured prisoners. The enemy retired this night. July 5, marched, following General Wood, who had a skirmish with the enemy's cavalry near Pace's Ferry, driving them over it. Encamped near Vining's Station, in reserve. July 6, remained in camp. July 7, moved camp, our left resting on Rottenwood Creek. July 8, remained in camp. July 9, marched to Roswell to support Garrard's cavalry and occupy any ground they had gained after crossing the river. Crossed the river about dusk at Shallow Ford and relieved the cavalry, who recrossed to the north side, except their picket in front. July 10, adjusted our lines and made a t~te-de-pont. General Dodge, with two divisions of the Sixteenth Corps, arrived to-day and relieved our front line. July 11, recrossed the river and went into camp on hills near S
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
everely wounded. June 28, 29, and 30, remained in trenches resting. July 1 and 2, remained quietly behind works. July 3, the enemy having evacuated his works during the night, the One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at 6 a. m. and bivouacked at five miles below Marietta near the railroad, confronting the enemy. July 4, changed position and fortified; the enemy withdrew during the night. July 5, marched at 7 a. m. and bivouacked at night near Vining's Station. July 6, 7, and 8, rested in bivouac, men washing, &c. July 9, 10, and 11, moved with the division to support McCook's cavalry, which had effected a crossing of the Chattahcochee River at Roswell, twelve miles above Vining's. July 12, 13, and 14, returned to Vining's Station, crossed the Chattahoochee River at Powers' Ferry, and constructed breast-works at a point two miles farther south. July 15, 16, and 17, remained quietly in camp; no enemy appeared in our immediate front. July 18, the entire command moved
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 77 (search)
formed with the brigade, the regiment in the front line, and put up works under the fire of the enemy's skirmishers, having 2 men wounded. During the night the enemy evacuated his position, leaving formidable works. On the morning of the 5th I received orders to march, and at 6 o'clock we moved with the brigade to within a few hundred yards of Pace's Ferry, on the Chattahoochee River, the enemy retreating across the river. We went into camp and remained inactive until about 2 p. m. the 8th of July, when, by order of Colonel Knefler, we moved about one mile to the right of the brigade, and went into camp, throwing up a line of works, a few rebels being seen in our front. On the morning of the 9th the regiment went on picket, no. enemy being seen in our front. On the morning of the 10th the regiment was withdrawn from picket, and orders issued to be in readiness to march. About 8 a. m. we moved with the brigade about six miles to our left up the river, and went into calip near th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 84 (search)
sion eight miles to Chattahoochee River; went into a position on a ridge near the river, commanding pontoon bridge. July 6, threw up works in front of the guns during the night; remained in same position as that of the 5th; fired four rounds without getting any reply from the enemy. July 7, remained in same position, everything quiet; opened on the enemy at 8 p. m., by order of Captain Bridges, chief of artillery, Fourth Army Corps; fired seventy-seven rounds; got no reply from the enemy. July 8, lay quietly in camp; no firing on either side. July 9, remained in same position; opened on enemy's battery at 2 p. m., which was in position in our immediate front; fired sixteen rounds; could not tell what effect our shot had on the enemy, as their battery was stationed in the woods. July 10, remained in same position; all quiet in front. July 11, remained in position quietly without doing any firing; all quiet in front of our position. July 12, remained in same position. July 13, le
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 112 (search)
alion; participated in the whole campaign; severely wounded September 1. First Lieut. Horace Brown, in arrest at opening of campaign; resigned July 28. First Lieut. Daniel W. Benham, quartermaster First Battalion; commanded Company E, First, from July 8 to July 15; was adjutant of detachment from June 6 to July 8; appointed on brigade staff July 15; participated in the whole campaign. First Lieut. Frederick Phisterer, adjutant Second Battalion, entered campaign; received leave of absence AugustJuly 8; appointed on brigade staff July 15; participated in the whole campaign. First Lieut. Frederick Phisterer, adjutant Second Battalion, entered campaign; received leave of absence August 18. First Lieut. Frederick H. Brown, regimental quartermaster, participated in the whole campaign as acting quartermaster Second Battalion, and commanding Company G, Second, till July 9; appointed detachment quartermaster June 27. First Lieut. William H. Bisbee, joined May 16; commanded Companies A, Second, and G, Third, till August 20, when appointed adjutant Second Battalion and detachment adjutant; slightly wounded July 30. First Lieut. John I. Adair, joined May--; commanded Company D, Seco
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