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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 285 285 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 32 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 10 10 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 5 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson. You can also browse the collection for July 14th or search for July 14th in all documents.

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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 15: Cedar Run. (search)
ssume command of his army at Manassa's Junction, celebrated the triumphs to be achieved, before they were won, with banners and laurels. The corps returned from Westover to the neigborhood of Richmond, the 10th of July. There they remained until the 17th, preparing for their march; and it was during this respite that General Jackson first made his appearance openly, in the city which he had done so much to deliver. He gives the following account of it in a letter to his wife. Richmond, July 14th. Yesterday I heard Doctor M. D. Hoge preach in his church, and also in the camp of the Stonewall Brigade. It is a great comfort to have the privilege of spending a quiet Sabbath, within the walls of a house dedicated to the service of God. . . . .People are very kind to me. How God, our God, does shower blessings upon me, an unworthy sinner! The manner of his entrance was this. He came tothe church without attendants; and just after the congregation was assembled, they saw an offi