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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 5 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 5 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
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John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 14: Manassas. (search)
to turn this position on the South. To conceal his purpose, and create the impression of a contemplated attack in front, he directed his march upon Centreville on the Warrenton turnpike. On Thursday morn- Bull Run-the field of strategy. ing, July 18th, Tyler moved upon Centreville, but, arriving there at nine o'clock, he found that it, too, had been evacuated, and that Beauregard's entire army was behind Bull Run. Centreville being situated on a hill, Tyler could see the whole valley spreadan of turning the enemy's right, because of the unfavorable nature of the ground and roads. The necessity of finding an unfortified crossing seemed now also demonstrated. Meeting his division commanders at Centreville, that same night of Thursday, July 18th, McDowell informed them confidentially that he had abandoned his original plan, and had resolved to make the attack by marching northward and turning Beauregard's left flank instead of his right. As an incident of this resolve, however
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
gone farther south. 3Not an able-bodied man was to be found between Marietta and the enemy's line. We could only feel our way cautiously forward, using the greatest diligence in reconnaissances. The Army of the Tennessee, forming the left wing, was directed toward Stone Mountain; the Army of the Ohio, in the center, toward Cross Keys and Decatur, and the Army of the Cumberland, on the right, via Buck Head, toward Atlanta. The left wing and the center crossed Nancy's Creek the same day, July 18. The cavalry division of General Garrard, which had been operating on the extreme left, succeeded in reaching the Augusta railroad between Decatur and Stone Mountain. On the next day, July 19, the Twenty-third Army Corps, after a sharp skirmish, occupied Decatur, where it formed a junction with the Army of the Tennessee. The Army of the Ohio then withdrew, and passing to the right camped for the night on Pea Vine Creek. The Army of the Cumberland crossed a small force over Peach Tree Cr
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
in position. July 17, General Wood's division moved down the south side of the river three miles, to clear the way for laying a bridge at Pace's Ferry and cover the crossing of the Fourteenth Corps. As soon as this was accomplished the division returned. Owing to the rugged nature of the country, the want of roads, and. the proximity of the enemy's masses to Pace's Ferry, Wood's movement was an important and delicate one. It was satisfactorily executed, and without an engagement. July 18, an intimation was given by signal dispatch, about midnight, that orders would be received to march at daylight. Upon this dispatch the corps was directed to move. The order of instructions was not received till 5 a. m., just as the corps was moving. As far as concerned this command, it was to march directly on Buck Head and go into position on the left of the place, along the Turner's Ferry and Buck Head road. Newton's head of column left camp at 4.30 a. m. Very little opposition was e
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
h line and advanced line of battle; took enemy's skirmish pits and intrenched during the evening. July 5, enemy evacuated, brigade marched to the Chattahoochee River. July 6, 7, 8, and 9, occupied same position. July 10, at 10 a. m. marched on road leading up the river, camped within one mile of pontoon crossing. July 11, occupied same position. July 12, crossed the river and went into position on high bluff one mile below crossing. July 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, occupied same position. July 18, brigade marched out Atlanta road at 5 a. m., following General Newton's division; camped near Buck Head. July 19, marched about three miles and went into position on left of division. July 20, marched in rear of division, crossed south fork Peach Tree Creel, and bivouacked in rear of Colonel Taylor's lines. July 21, occupied same position. July 22, marched in pursuit of enemy; went into position in front of enemy at 10 a. m., and advanced skirmish line. July 23, 24, 25, and 26, occupi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 22 (search)
he night of July 2 moved to the left and relieved the One hundredth Illinois on picket. July 3, moved with the brigade several miles past Marietta. July 4, Captain Patrick, in command of the picket detail, was wounded in advancing the line, causing the loss of his left arm. July 5, moved to Vining's Station, near the Chattahoochee; laid there till the 10th, and were moved to the left. July 12, crossed the river, threw up works on a high ridge near the river, and laid there till the 18th. July 18 and 19, moved with the brigade in the direction of Atlanta. July 20, crossed Peach Tree Creek, and when lines were formed were placed in support of the Fifth Indiana Battery, in which position we laid till the morning of the 22d, when, the enemy having left, we moved forward. Upon coming up with the enemy's line, were formed, threw up works, and remained in position till the 26th. The night of July 26 moved to lines protecting the left flank and rear, remaining there till August 1. Loss
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 25 (search)
ng the enemy, with a loss to our regiment of 10 men killed and wounded. On the night of the 22d we were relieved, and were sent to the right, where we in turn relieved a portion of Hooker's corps. On the 23d we advanced our line, driving the enemy, with some loss, and gained an important position, which we intrenched and held. The regiment was not again actively engaged with the enemy until after crossing the Chattahoochee, though under fire nearly every day until we reached the river. July 18, we bivouacked at Buck Head and moved forward the next day toward Atlanta, encountering the enemy's skirmishers at night. On the 20th we again advanced, and after crossing Peach Tree Creek formed in line of battle. This regiment was held in support of the Twenty-first Kentucky, which was deployed as skirmishers. When in the afternoon a vigorous assault was made upon the skirmish line, and the right of the Twenty-third Corps, which connected with us, gave way, this regiment was moved up t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 26 (search)
cannot speak too highly of the conduct of my officers and men on this occasion. Our total loss in the action, which lasted one hour and a half, was 4 enlisted men killed, and 6 wounded. On the following day we followed the retreating enemy to a point near the Chattahoochee River, where we remained in reserve until July 10, when with our division the regiment moved to the left, and on July 12 crossed the river, occupying a position in front of the Twenty-third Corps. We remained here until July 18, when the regiment was ordered to report to the corps supply train for duty. Nothing of importance transpired while with the train. On the 30th of August the regiment was relieved from duty with the train and ordered to report immediately to the brigade. Reported to the brigade on the sae day; found the troops to the rear of Atlanta. The same night the Thirty-fifth supported the skirmish line, and on the morning of the 31st advanced a short distance in support of the line, when the reg
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
Seventy-fifth Illinois, one of the best officers in the army, fell here. July 5, pursued the enemy (Wood's division in front) to the river. Continued skirmishing until July 10. Marched five miles up the river. July 12, crossed the Chattahoochee; marched down the left bank. and encamped at Powers' Ferry, in front of the Twenty-third Corps, with our corps. Thirty-sixth Indiana commenced and built while here a trestle bridge over the river, which was completed on the 16th day of July. July 18, moved from Powers' Ferry with corps to near Buck Head, south seven miles. July 19, advanced across Peach Tree Creek, Seventy-fifth Illinois in advance. Skirmished and drove the enemy from the destroyed bridge and rebuilt the same. July 20, moved with division, Second Brigade in front; crossed south Peach Tree Creek and came upon the fortified position of the enemy. Went into position on the right of the Second Brigade, attacked the rifle-pits of the enemy, carried the same, taking 43 pr
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
d. The regiment lost 7 wounded, and. Capt. Robert Hale, of Company I, killed. At daylight on July 5 we find the works of the enemy evacuated, and were in readiness to move toward the Chattahoochee River. We go into camp on the right bank at 4 p. m. Here the command rests, only doing picket duty, till the 10th July. One man was wounded on the 7th by a shot from the enemy on the opposite bank. On the 11th of July we move up the river, cross it. On the 12th go into camp, wait orders till 18th of July, when at daylight again ready to march. At 2 a. m. July 19 receive orders from brigade commander to move out as a reconnoitering party on the Decatur road as far as Peach Tree Creek. Two companies were sent in advance of the column. They reached the creek at about 9 a. m., and placed two sentinels on the opposite side. At this point no enemy was discovered. Two mounted men, wearing the uniform of U. S. soldiers, advanced within a few rods of these sentinels and refused to obey their o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
ur front. July 7, arranged camp in proper order and prepared for a few days' rest. July 8, still resting quietly in camp; moved about three miles up the river. July 9, 10, and II, remained quietly in camp. July 12, moved across and some two miles down the Chattahoochee River, and again went into camp, our right resting on the river and running at right angles with it. Built a line of log works in front of the regiment. July 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, lay quietly in camp in same position. July 18, left camp at 6 a. m. and marched five miles in a southeasterly direction, when we encamped for the night. July 19, marched to Peach Tree Creek, about three miles, over which we rebuilt a bridge which the enemy partially destroyed on their retreat. At dark we moved across the creek and encamped for the night. July 20, moved about three miles and took position on the front line. Forty-three of the enemy were captured by our skirmish line, in charge of Lieutenant Drullinger. Built two li
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