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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, V. August, 1861 (search)
bellion is not a practicable thing. August 4 To-day Mr. Walker inquired where my son Custis was. I told him he was with his mother at Newbern, N. C. He authorized me to telegraph him to return, and he should be appointed to a clerkship. August 5 Col. Bledsoe has a job directly from the President: which is to adapt the volume of U. S. Army Regulations to the service of the Confederate States. It is only to strike out U. S. and insert C. S., and yet the colonel groans over it. August 6 Custis arrived and entered upon the discharge of his duties. August 7 Saw Col. Pendleton to-day, but it was not the first time. I have seen him in the pulpit, and heard him preach good sermons. He is an Episcopal minister. He it was that plowed such destruction through the ranks of the invaders at Manassas. At first the battery did no execution; perceiving this, he sighted the guns himself and fixed the range. Then exclaiming, Fire, boys! and may God have mercy on their guilt
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 18 (search)
shington, while the enemy think he merely designs a defense of Richmond. Troops are on the move, all the way from Florida to Gordonsville. August 5 The enemy have postponed drafting, that compulsory mode of getting men being unpopular, until after the October elections. I hope Lee will make the most of his time, and annihilate their drilled and seasoned troops. He can put more fighting men in Virginia than the enemy, during the next two months. Now's the day, and now's the hour! August 6 Jackson is making preparations to fight. I know the symptoms. He has made Pope believe he's afraid of him. August 7 Much incomprehensible manceuvring is going on in Orange County. August 8 We hear of skirmishing in Orange County, and the enemy seem as familiar with the paths and fords as our own people; hence some surprises, attempted by our cavalry, have failed. August 9 Jackson and Ewell are waiting and watching. Pope will expose himself soon. August 10 Jacks
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXIX. August, 1863 (search)
if there will be another battle for a month. Meantime the Treasury notes continue to depreciate, and all the necessaries of life advance in price-but they do not rise in proportion. The Examiner had a famous attack on the President to-day (from the pen, I think, of a military man, on Gen. Scott's staff, when Mr. Davis was Secretary of War), for alleged stubbornness and disregard of the popular voice; for appointing Pemberton, Holmes, Mallory, etc., with a side fling at Memminger. August 6 A dispatch from Gen. Lee shows that he is still falling back (this side the Rapidan), but gradually concentrating his forces. There may be another battle speedily-and if our army does not gain a great victory, there will be great disappointment. There are some gun-boats in the James as high up as Aiken's Landing. Two torpedoes, badly ignited, failed to injure either of them. Capt. Kay, of Mobile, in conjunction with several other parties, has a scheme for the destruction of the
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 42 (search)
t no important change has occurred in front of Atlanta. There was some skirmishing yesterday, and shell thrown into Atlanta. My daughter Anne, after ten months residence in the country, returned to-day (with Miss Randolph, of Loudon Co.) in perfect health. She brought apples, eggs, a watermelon, cucumbers, etc. Mr. Davies sold my reel (German silver) to-day for $75, or about $3.20 in gold-enough to buy a cord of wood. I parted with it reluctantly, as I hope to catch fish yet. August 6 Hot and dry. The booming of cannon heard yesterday evening was from one of our batteries below Drewry's Bluff. The enemy answered from their batteries, the existence of which we had no knowledge of before. No one was hurt. About the same time Gen. Beauregard sprung a mine under the enemy's mine, and blew it up, no doubt destroying many lives. This was succeeded by heavy, but, perhaps, harmless shelling along the lines. Another raiding party has been defeated and dispersed