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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 3 3 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 2 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 2 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 2 2 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 2 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 2 2 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 38 (search)
me left of the infantry forces and but a few rods from the Howard house. The First Brigade of First Division was to my right and Colonel Minty's brigade of cavalry to my left. My pickets occupied the old works, where the Fifteenth Corps fought in the engagement of the 22d of July. At 5 ). m. August 6 I was ordered to make a demonstration toward Atlanta, with a re-enforced skirmish line. The demonstration was continued till dusk, when the original status was resumed without casualty. August 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, nothing but the ordinary picket duty was required of this brigade. 12th, at 11 a. m. made a reconnaissance to the front with two of my regiments and two of the First Division. Drove back the rebel pickets and got a good view of their main works on the Decatur road. Lost 1 man killed. Returned by 2 p. m. 13th and 14th, all quiet in my command. 15th, the cavalry left and my lines were extended to the left. 16th, at 8.20 p. m. received orders to move a thousand yards
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 92 (search)
No. 88. report of Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 7. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, August 7, 1864. General: The Fourteenth Corps gained decided advantage to-day. The charge of my old division, under King, against the enemy's works was a gallant affair; in fact, the operations of the entire corps are highly satisfactory. A portion of King's men were actually in the enemy's works, but in consequence of the entanglements few men could reach them and not in sufficient force to hold them. The lines are advanced. King is intrenched beyond the rebel skirmish line of this morning. Baird's line is in advance of its position this morning. The position of Morgan was fully explained this evening. We have lost not far from 500 men, while we have captured about 350 or 400 prisoners. R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General. [Major-General Schofield.] Addenda: report of casualties in Fourteenth Army Corps during
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
No. 90. report of Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-June 13 and July 13-August 7. Hdqrs. First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., August--, 1864. Captain : In accordance with military usage, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division from the opening of the campaign of the armies under command of Major-General Sherman down to the 13th of June, at which period I was compelled te in the evening made a reconnaissance to the right to find the flank of the rebel lines, which was undertaken too late to accomplish much. On the 6th relieved General Hascall's division, which was moved to the right to join its proper corps. August 7, was ordered to assume command of the Fourteenth Army Corps, by virtue of seniority. In this hurried report I am unable to do the troops justice. When the campaign ends will forward a list of those whose good conduct deserves special mentio
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
orks extended at least one and a half miles to the right of the point at which the attack was made. After gaining this information the command was withdrawn, by General Johnson's orders, to the rear of the works occupied by the troops of the Twenty-third Army Corps, and at 8 p. m. the brigade moved to the left about two miles and went into position on the right of the Fifteenth Army Corps in the works occupied by General Hascall's division. August 6.-Nothing of importance occurred. August 7.-The line was advanced about 500 yards to a hill west of Utoy Creek, about 200 yards from the enemy's main line. In gaining possession of this hill, the brigade carried two lines of riflepits under a very heavy fire from the enemy. The first line was charged and taken by the Eighty-eighth Indiana, which sustained severe loss. The second line was carried by the Twenty-first Wisconsin, which regiment also lost several men. After the hill was carried, the enemy opened a heavy fire of shell
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 98 (search)
lled and 2 wounded. On the 21st 1 man mortally wounded by a stray ball. On the 22d the command started to Atlanta, but found the enemy had not evacuated the place. A heavy skirmish occurred in which we lost 1 officer and 2 men killed, and 1 officer and 5 men wounded, while advancing the skirmish line to the suburbs. From this time to the close of July comparative quiet prevailed and no casualties occurred. August 1, heavy skirmishing all day but no casualties. August 2, 2 men wounded. August 7, the command charged the rebel lines, capturing their riflepits; lost 1 killed, I severely and 1 mortally wounded. August 8, still skirmishing; 3 men wounded. August 9, 1 man mortally and 1 slightly wounded by sharpshooters. During the period between the latter date and our arrival at Jonesborough, with the exception of one or two light skirmishes with the loss of 3 men wounded, nothing important occurred. It is but justice to say that owing to my absence on account of sickness the regi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 99 (search)
works in advance of our line. August 3, relieved by Third Brigade and lay in reserve; I lost while on front line 1 man killed and 7 wounded; moved some six miles to the right. August 5, formed part of a reconnaissance to discover the left flank of the enemy; found strong works and evidently masked artillery. August 6, returned and irelieved Second Brigade, Second Division, Twentythirds Army. Corps, early in the morning, but built new works in advance of theirs and just got them finished, August 7, when we were ordered forward and advanced, driving the rebels from their works, and, under a galling fire, we established our lines on a height some 600 or 700 yards in advance of our former position; the enemy had a cross-fire on us, but the right advancing drove. them from their position; our loss was 2. men killed. 2 officers and 8 men wounded; our pickets and those of the rebels on very amicable terms with one another while encamped on Utoy Creek, which resulted in nearly the whole
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 101 (search)
and moved forward. The enemy was driven about three-quarters of a mile through a thick wood of timber and underbrush, where we came upon him in his works, quietly waiting an attack. The line was halted. After some time, orders were received to retire, which was done in good order. Went back and camped in open field, by General Baird's headquarters; loss, 1 wounded. August 6, crossed creek at mill and moved up toward works. Was not in line. In evening moved out and constructed works. August 7, remained in works. Major Barger was severely wounded by a stray shot. August 8, moved in the evening and constructed works in the interval between the left of the Forty-second Indiana and the right of the Fifteenth Corps. August 9, drove the enemy at daylight from his skirmish works on our front; lost 1 killed and 5 wounded. August 10, the regiment was sorely annoyed by the enemy's sharpshooters and a battery of artillery posted on a hill to the right of our front; loss, I killed, 2 woun
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 102 (search)
ed by rebel sharpshooter. During the night of July 2 the enemy evacuated his position and retreated four miles below Marietta. The night of July 9 the enemy again withdrew across the Chattahoochee River. Camped on the opposite side of river from the enemy until July 17, when we moved across the river. During the engagement July 20 we were in support of the left wing of brigade; lost 1 man killed and 7 wounded by rebel shell. July 22, were engaged in front of Atlanta; 2 men wounded. August 7, advanced the lines; 3 men wounded. August 13, 1 man killed. August 15, 1 man killed. August 20, 1 man wounded. August 24, 1 man killed. Moved the night of the 26th; no casualties in regiment since. The officers and men of the command have done nobly. They have proved themselves brave and efficient in all skirmishes and engagements during the campaign. Nominal list of casualties (omitted) shows 21 men killed and 2 officers and 53 men wounded; total, 76. Very respectfully, you
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 103 (search)
inst the rebels, charged upon the double-quick up the hill to the right of that regiment, the rebels falling back at the beginning of the movement, before the Twenty-first reached the position, leaving their dead and wounded on the field. In this affair the regiment lost 3 wounded. July 21, at 7 p. m. moved south one mile and threw up heavy earthworks, but July 22, the rebels having again fallen back, at daylight, we advanced to Atlanta and took position on the north side of that city. August 7, the regiment, in the mean time, having moved toward the right of the position of our army, about 4 p. m. General Carlin ordered two companies of this regiment to be deployed against the rifle-pits occupied by the enemy's skirmishers. The first division of the regiment, commanded by Capt. Henry Turner, was moved forward, and they were supported in a few minutes by the second division, under Captain Edwards. These two divisions moved gallantly, but met with such stubborn resistance that th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 104 (search)
n assumed command of the division, and being notified that I was the senior officer present with the brigade for duty, I took command. General King did not return to the brigade during the remainder of the campaign. Lieut. Col. M. Mudge, Eleventh Michigan Volunteers, who joined after Colonel Stoughton was wounded. was present with the command, but was sick at the time and did duty but two days from the 6th until his regiment was withdrawn from the brigade; those were the 7th and 8th. August 7, about I p. m. I was directed by the division commander to throw forward the Eighteenth Infantry as a skirmish line, to be followed by the Fifteenth Infantry in line of battle. This was done, and subsequently the Eleventh Michigan was sent forward to take position on the right of the Fifteenth. A spirited and determined engagement ensued, which resulted in driving the enemy from his rifle-pits, capturing a large number of prisoners, and advancing our line to within 150 yards of the enemy'
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