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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 300 300 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 56 56 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 12 12 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 11 11 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for August 7th or search for August 7th in all documents.

Your search returned 56 results in 41 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
, I telegraphed to have General Sheridan, then at Washington, sent to Harper's Ferry by the morning train, with orders to take general command of all the troops in the field, and to call on General Hunter, at Monocacy, who would turn over to him my letter of instructions. I remained at Monocacy until General Sheridan arrived, on the morning of the 6th, and after a conference with him in relation to military affairs in that vicinity, I returned to City Point by way of Washington. On the 7th of August the Middle Department and the Departments of West Virginia, Washington, and Susquehanna were constituted into the Middle Military Division, and Major-General Sheridan was assigned to temporary command of the same. Two divisions of cavalry, commanded by Generals Torbert and Wilson, were sent to Sheridan from the Army of the Potomac. The first reached him at Harper's Ferry about the 11th of August. His operations during the month of August and the fore part of September were both of an
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
. William Grose, U. S. Army, commanding Third Brigade. No. 24Col. P. Sidney Post, Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations July 27-August 7. No. 25Col. John E. Bennett, Seventy-fifth Illinois Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations September 4-8. No. 26Col. John E. Bennett, Seventy-fifth perations May 30, and itinerary of the corps May 6-September 8. No. 88Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 7. No. 89Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 22-September 8. No. 90Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-June 13 and July 13-August 7. No. 91Brig. Gen. William P. Carlin, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations August 17-September 8. No. 92Journal of the First Brigade. No. 93Lieut. Col. Douglas Hapeman, One hundred and fourth Illinois Infantry, No. 94Lieut
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
Marietta to superintend the construction of defenses at that place. An attack was ordered for 2 p. m., the object being as given above, but again no attack was made. August 6, the attack, twice before ordered, was made, but repulsed. The two corps of the Army of the Cumberland, forming the left of our army, kept steadily pushing forward, but without anything like siege approaches. Our sharpshooters had gained such positions as rendered it difficult for the enemy to work his guns. August 7, the attack made yesterday was renewed, and proved successful.. It was found that the line of rifle trenches carried by the assault was not the enemy's main line, but stood nearly perpendicularly to it. The Army of the Tennessee moved forward about 400 yards, swinging upon the center of its right wing as a pivot. The successive advances, either directly or by swing upon some part of the line as a pivot, were made in the following manner-by pushing forward, just before daylight, a strong li
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
uly 23, 24, 25, and 26, occupied same position, building works and skirmishing. July 27, at 9 p. m. moved to left flank of army and occupied enemy's old works. July 28, 29, 30, and 31, occupied same position. August 1 in the evening relieved one brigade of General Hascall's division on the front line. August 2, occupied same position. August 3, made demonstration with skirmish line; lost 8 men wounded. August 4. same position. August 5, made demonstration with skirmish line. August 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, all quiet. August 12, advanced skirmish line 300 or 400 yards, met very little resistance, and returned to old position. August 13, 14, and 15, occupied same position. August 16, shifted position to the left, the length of the brigade. August 17 and 18, all quiet. August 19, put the brigade in position on the Augusta railroad to the left of picket-line, deployed Ninetieth Ohio, One hundred and first Ohio, and Twenty-first Illinois as skirmishers and advanced onehalf mil
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 28 (search)
No. 24. report of Col. P. Sidney Post, Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry, commanding Third brigade, of operations July 27-August 7. Hdqrs. Third Brig., First DIv., 4TH Army Corps, Atlanta, Ga,., September 15, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit a report of the operations of the Third Brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, while under my command, from the 27th day of July to the 7th of August, 1864: The brigade consisted of the following regiments: Eighty-fourth Regiment Illinois Infantry, commanded by Colonel Waters; Seventyfifth Regiment Illinois Infantry, commanded by Colonel Bennett; Ninth Regiment Indiana Veteran Infantry, commanded by Colonel Suman ; Seventy-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Veteran Infantry, commanded by Colonel Rose; Thirtieth Regiment Indiana Veteran Infantry, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Hurd; Thirty-sixth Regiment Indiana Infantry, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Carey; Fifty-ninth Regiment Illinois Veteran Infantry, commanded by Lieutena
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
things remained unchanged in our front. August 1 and 2, nothing of importance occurred on our front during the last two days. August 3, our skirmish line was advanced this afternoon, charging that of the enemy and capturing 30 prisoners, but they massed their forces and compelled ours to fall back. Our loss slight. August 4, all quiet in our front to-day. August 5, skirmishers advanced and tried to drive in or capture the rebel skirmish line, but failed. No loss in regiment. August 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, all quiet in our front during these days. August 11, demonstration made on the picket-line by firing from rifle-pits; otherwise all quiet during the day. August 12 and 13, all quiet except occasional artillery firing. August 14, very heavy cannonading all night on our lines, the enemy replying but little. August 15 and 16, all quiet in our front. August 17, lines were extended to the left; the right did not move. A foraging party went out from the regiment and 2 of its memb
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 38 (search)
me left of the infantry forces and but a few rods from the Howard house. The First Brigade of First Division was to my right and Colonel Minty's brigade of cavalry to my left. My pickets occupied the old works, where the Fifteenth Corps fought in the engagement of the 22d of July. At 5 ). m. August 6 I was ordered to make a demonstration toward Atlanta, with a re-enforced skirmish line. The demonstration was continued till dusk, when the original status was resumed without casualty. August 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, nothing but the ordinary picket duty was required of this brigade. 12th, at 11 a. m. made a reconnaissance to the front with two of my regiments and two of the First Division. Drove back the rebel pickets and got a good view of their main works on the Decatur road. Lost 1 man killed. Returned by 2 p. m. 13th and 14th, all quiet in my command. 15th, the cavalry left and my lines were extended to the left. 16th, at 8.20 p. m. received orders to move a thousand yards
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 92 (search)
No. 88. report of Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 7. headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, August 7, 1864. General: The Fourteenth Corps gained decided advantage to-day. The charge of my old division, under King, against the enemy's works was a gallant affair; in fact, the operations of the entire corps are highly satisfactory. A portion of King's men were actually in the enemy's works, but in consequence of the entanglements few men could reach them and not in sufficient force to hold them. The lines are advanced. King is intrenched beyond the rebel skirmish line of this morning. Baird's line is in advance of its position this morning. The position of Morgan was fully explained this evening. We have lost not far from 500 men, while we have captured about 350 or 400 prisoners. R. W. Johnson, Brigadier-General. [Major-General Schofield.] Addenda: report of casualties in Fourteenth Army Corps during
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
No. 90. report of Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-June 13 and July 13-August 7. Hdqrs. First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., August--, 1864. Captain : In accordance with military usage, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my division from the opening of the campaign of the armies under command of Major-General Sherman down to the 13th of June, at which period I was compelled te in the evening made a reconnaissance to the right to find the flank of the rebel lines, which was undertaken too late to accomplish much. On the 6th relieved General Hascall's division, which was moved to the right to join its proper corps. August 7, was ordered to assume command of the Fourteenth Army Corps, by virtue of seniority. In this hurried report I am unable to do the troops justice. When the campaign ends will forward a list of those whose good conduct deserves special mentio
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
orks extended at least one and a half miles to the right of the point at which the attack was made. After gaining this information the command was withdrawn, by General Johnson's orders, to the rear of the works occupied by the troops of the Twenty-third Army Corps, and at 8 p. m. the brigade moved to the left about two miles and went into position on the right of the Fifteenth Army Corps in the works occupied by General Hascall's division. August 6.-Nothing of importance occurred. August 7.-The line was advanced about 500 yards to a hill west of Utoy Creek, about 200 yards from the enemy's main line. In gaining possession of this hill, the brigade carried two lines of riflepits under a very heavy fire from the enemy. The first line was charged and taken by the Eighty-eighth Indiana, which sustained severe loss. The second line was carried by the Twenty-first Wisconsin, which regiment also lost several men. After the hill was carried, the enemy opened a heavy fire of shell
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