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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
y L. Philips. Artillery, Capt. Henry H. Griffiths, Maj. John T. Cheney, Capt. H. H. Griffiths, Capt. Josiah H. Burton: F, 1st Ill., Capt. Josiah H. Burton, Lieut. Jefferson F. Whaley, Lieut. George P. Cuningham; 1st Iowa, Lieut. William H. Gay, Capt. H. H. Griffiths, Lieut. W. H. Gay. Sixteenth Army Corps (Left Wing), Maj.-Gen. Grenville M. Dodge, Brig.-Gen. Thomas E. G. Ransom. General Headquarters: 1st Ala. Cav., Lieut.-Col. G. L. Godfrey, Col. George E. Spencer; A, 52d Ill. (detailed Aug. 8th), Capt. George E. Young. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas W. Sweeny, Brig.-Gen. Elliott W. Rice, Brig.-Gen. John M. Corse. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Elliott W. Rice: 52d Ill., Lieut.-Col. Edwin A. Bowen; 66th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Roger Martin, Maj. Thomas G. Morrison, Capt. Alfred Morris; 2d Iowa, Col. James B. Weaver, Lieut.-Col. Noel B. toward, Maj. Mathew G. Hamill, Capt. John A. Duckworth; 7th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. James C. Parrott, Maj. James W. McMullin, Lieut.-Col. J. C. Parrott, Maj.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
have been a sensible man, for on the morning of the 7th he sent a communication to Admiral Farragut offering to surrender, and requesting that he be given the best conditions. General Granger was sent for by the Admiral to meet Colonel Anderson and Major Brown on board the flag-ship, where an agreement was signed, by which Fort Gaines was surrendered unconditionally. All private property (except arms) was to be respected, and the inmates of the fort were to remain prisoners-of-war. On August 8th, Fleet-Captain Drayton, on the part of the Navy, and Colonel Myer, on the part of the Army, proceeded to the fort to carry out the stipulations of the agreement, and at 9:45 A. M. they received its surrender. and hoisted the Union flag amid the prolonged cheers of the sailors of the fleet. No cheers were ever given with more ardor, for this victory was seen to be another of the severe death-blows given to an enemy whose end was very near. This was the close of the battle on the water.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
apsco. Nantucket, Ottawa, Dai Ching, Paul Jones, Seneca. July 25. Wagner Ottawa, Dai Ching, Paul Jones. July 28. Wagner Weehawken, Catskill, Ottawa. July 29. Wagner Ironsides, Patapsco. July 30. Wagner Ironsides, Catskill, Patapsco, Ottawa. July 31. Batteries on Morris Island Ottawa. Aug. 1. Wagner Montauk, Patapsco, Catskill, Weehawken, Passaic, Nahant, Marblehead. Aug. 2. Wagner Ottawa. Marblehead. Aug. 4. Wagner Montauk, Marblehead. Aug. 6. Wagner Marblehead. Aug. 8. Wagner Ottawa, Mahaska, Marblehead. Aug. 11. Wagner and vicinity Patapsco, Catskill. Aug. 13. Morris Island Dai Ching, Ottawa, Mahaska, Racer, Wissahickon. Aug. 14. Morris Island Wissahickon, Mahaska, Dan Smith, Ottawa, Dai Ching, Racer. Aug. 15. Wagner Racer, Dan Smith. Aug. 17. Batteries on Morris Island to direct fire from the batteries which opened on Sumter. Weehawken, Ironsides, Montauk, Nahant, Catskill, Passaic, Patapsco, Canandaigua Mahaska, Ottawa, Cimmaron, Wissahi
line, however, of the deliberations and decisions of the Convention are sufficiently exhibited in the Constitution, and in what we know of the various propositions rejected in the course of its formation. The purpose of this work will require only a rapid summary of what was done, and what left undone, in relation to Human Slavery. A majority of the framers of the Constitution, like nearly all their compatriots of our Revolutionary era, were adverse to Slavery. In the debate of Wednesday, August 8, on the adoption of the report of the Committee, Mr. Rufus King [then of Massachusetts, afterward an eminent Senator from New York] wished to know what influence the vote just passed was meant to have on the succeeding part of the report concerning the admission of slaves into the rule of representation. He could not reconcile his mind to the Article (Art. VII., Sect. 3), if it was to prevent objections to the latter part. The admission of slaves was a most grating circumstanc
e which time, it had become evident that Mexico, distracted and enfeebled by so many revolutions, could make no effective resistance to the progress of our arms. President Polk, not without reason, believed that a treaty of peace might be negotiated with her rickety government, whereby, on the payment of a sum of money on our part, not only the boundary of the Rio Grande, but a very considerable acquisition of hitherto Mexican territory beyond that river, might be secured. He accordingly (August 8) sent a Special Message to Congress, asking that a considerable sum be placed at his disposal for these purposes. A bill was immediately reported and considered in Committee of the Whole, making appropriations of $30,000 for expenses of negotiations, and $2,000,000, to be used at the discretion of the President, in making such a treaty. This bill seemed on the point of passing through all its stages without serious opposition. But what should be the Social or Labor system of the territ
he early part of the engagement, and considerably less than 4,000 troops for the concluding four hours of it. Maj. Sturgis, in his official report of the battle, says: That 3,700 men, after a fatiguing night-march, attacked the enemy, numbering 23,000, on their own ground, and, after a bloody conflict of six hours, withdrew at their pleasure, is the best eulogium. I can pass on their conduct that day. Gen. Lyon's entire force, as returned by his Adjutant, J. C. Kelton, on the 8th of August (the day before the battle), was 5,368; which included his sick and wounded in hospital, all who were absent on special duty, and his guard left in Springfield. It is, therefore, certain that he fought the battle of Wilson's Creek with less than 5,500, and, after the rout of Sigel, with less than 4,500. We have seen that the Rebels, by their own account, had at least twice this number in the field, beside those left in camp for want of arms. He further says: Our total loss, in
crossing a considerable force in the vicinity of the junction of Buford's and Bayard's pickets, both Generals reported their advance; but it was some days before it was determined whether they were intending to advance in force on Madison C. H., or toward Culpepper C. H. On the 8th, the Rebels pressed Bayard's pickets, and his force fell back toward Culpepper C. H., followed by the enemy. Pope, under instructions to preserve his communications with Gen. King at Fredericksburg, ordered August 8. a concentration of his infantry and artillery upon Culpepper, his head quarters, and pushed forward Crawford's brigade toward Cedar (or, rather Slaughter's) Mountain: an eminence commanding a wide prospect to the south and east, and which should have been occupied and fortified by our forces some days before. Banks, by order. advanced promptly from Hazel Run to Culpepper; built Sigel, still at Sperryville, instead of moving at once, sent to ascertain by which route he should come; thus
ong, at Camp Nelson, near Richmond, Ky., commenced, Aug. 16. without awaiting the return of his old corps, his advance on Knoxville simultaneously with Rosecrans's movement on Chattanooga. Marching as light as possible — his men nearly all mounted; his munitions and stores mainly packed on mules — concentrating his forces at Crab Orchard, he pushed vigorously through Mount Vernon, London, Aug. 24. Williamsburg, and thence due south into Tennessee at Chitwood, halting two days Aug. 27-8. to rest; and then making a forced march over the mountains of 40 miles in two days, to Montgomery, and thence reaching Kingston, where the Holston and Clinch rivers unite to form the Tennessee; and where he was greeted by Rosecrans's pickets and communicated with Col. Minty's cavalry; while his army made another forced march oft two days to London, higher up; hoping, thus to save the railroad bridge, 2,000 feet long, over the Holston; which they reached Sept. 1. just in time to see it in f
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
ssertions and tone of this letter with his official course toward me — his not only retaining me in command of a department, but subsequently assigning me to that of the Army of Tennessee after its defeat under General Bragg at Missionary Ridge — the latter being far more important than any other military position in the Confederate service, except that occupied by General Lee. The accusations of this letter were answered seriatim, on my return to my office in Morton, in a letter dated August 8th. In its next session, and on the 11th of December, Congress called for the correspondence of the President, Secretary of War, and Adjutant and Inspector General, with General J. E. Johnston, during the months of May, June, and July, concerning his command, and the operations in his department. This was on the motion of Mr. Grimes, of Texas, a devoted follower of the President. In his letter to Congress accompanying the correspondence, the President explained: As the resolution fi
Doc. 156 1/2.-military situation in Missouri. Under date of Mexico, (Mo.,) Aug. 8, Brig.-Gen. Pope writes a letter to Mr. Isaac 11. Sturgeon, of St. Louis, explaining some points in his recent proclamation, which we have already published. After a vivid picture of the disordered condition in which he found affairs upon taking command of his Department, Gen. Pope says: My first object was to restore peace and safety, so that the forces under my command could be removed from the vicinity of the settlements, and to do this with the least bloodshed, the least distress to quiet persons, and the least exasperation of feeling amongst the people. Two courses were open to me to effect this desirable result. The first was to put in motion in all parts of this region small bodies of troops, to hunt out the parties in arms against the peace, and follow them to their homes or places of retreat, wherever they may be. This course would have led to frequent and bloody encounters, to sea
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