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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 409 409 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 15 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 15 15 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 14 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 11 11 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for August 21st or search for August 21st in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
t work to induce the enemy to believe that we contemplated no movement upon his rear of greater importance than a cavalry raid. The entire force of engineer officers hard at work reconnoitering all the roads to our right as far as the enemy's cavalry would permit. August 20, a force of infantry reached the Atlanta and West Point Railroad near Red Oak Station, and tore up a portion of the track. Our batteries were completed along our whole line and we were ready for any emergency. August 21 and 22, the pioneer force was all kept at work preparing siege materials. The batteries along our whole line kept up a slow but steady fire both upon the enemy's lines and upon the city of Atlanta. The remarks in this paragraph apply to every day for the last two weeks. August 23, under instructions from the major-general commanding, I went to the Chattahoochee railroad bridge and selected a line to be occupied by the corps (Twentieth), which was to be left behind during our movement
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
ld position. August 13, 14, and 15, occupied same position. August 16, shifted position to the left, the length of the brigade. August 17 and 18, all quiet. August 19, put the brigade in position on the Augusta railroad to the left of picket-line, deployed Ninetieth Ohio, One hundred and first Ohio, and Twenty-first Illinois as skirmishers and advanced onehalf mile, drove the enemy's skirmishers into their rifle-pits, and withdrew. In the afternoon made similar demonstrations. August 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, and 25, occupied same position, occasionally making a display of the troops. August 25, immediately after dark broke up camp and marched in rear of the lines to the right; crossed the Chattanooga railroad and bivouacked in some old works, Eighty-first Indiana deployed as pickets. August 26, the enemy advanced a strong line of skirmishers on our pickets, pushing them vigorously succeeded in driving our pickets off the ridge occupied. The Thirty-eighth Illinois was immediately de
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
at midnight to move at early daylight to the front, but did not move. August 19, at midnight received orders to march to the left on a reconnaissance. At 3.30 a. m. of the 20th moved as ordered, our regiment in the advance. Found the rebels quite numerous three miles from camp, skirmished with them nearly two hours, and drove them one-half mile. Casualties in our regiment were Major Carter slightly and 2 privates of Company B mortally [wounded]. All was quiet during the rest of the day. August 21, 22, 23, and 24, all quiet except some cannonading in our front. August 25, marched nearly all night to the right; met with no resistance. August 26, marched nearly all day to the right; nonveterans left for home. August 27, marched until 2 p. m. Pitched camp near New Hope Church; skirmish firing along the lines. August 28, marched until dark. August 29, all quiet; marched but a short distance. August 30, crossed the West Point railroad; marched south of Atlanta; regiment went on pic
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 101 (search)
skirmishing occurred, and the enemy made an assault upon the picket-line in the night, but accomplished noth ing; loss, 2 wounded. August 17, nothing further occurred than the usual amount of skirmish firing. August 18, enemy made a spirited attack upon the picket-line in the night, but were repulsed ; loss, 1 wounded. August 19, usual amount of skirmishing; no casualties. August 20, considerable skirmish firing; casualties, 2 killed. Also constructed a line of works on the right. August 21, were relieved at daylight and placed in reserve. Remained in same position till 26th August, nothing worthy of notice occurring that I have, to report. On the 26th, in the night, moved to the right some three miles and took position in a new line of works. August 27, nothing further than a little skirmishing occurred. August 28, moved early in the morning and marched to the Atlanta and West Point Railroad, and formed a line and constructed some rude works near Red Oak. August 29, earl
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 103 (search)
minutes by the second division, under Captain Edwards. These two divisions moved gallantly, but met with such stubborn resistance that the remaining six companies were thrown forward upon the charge, when the rebel pits were carried and several prisoners taken, among whom was a rebel captain. The regiment lost 13 wounded, among whom was Captain Turner, of Company D. This movement gave a good position for the main line to occupy within 150 yards of the enemy's works, which was held until August 21, at 8 p. m., when the regiment moved with the brigade around the left flank of the rebel army. August 28, came to the Montgomery railroad. six miles west of East Point. August 29, deployed as skirmishers in front of the brigade; moved east upon the Montgomery railroad, driving rebel cavalry about two miles, and moved back same day to point of departure. From that date until the present our movements have been merely marches, with the single exception. of the retreat in the face of the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 129 (search)
oad, and two regiments at Mim's house, to guard my left flank; taking Mr. Mim as a guide, moved forward to railroad at a point one-half mile north of Red Oak Station, cutting the road for a short distance and telegraph line; returned to camp at dark; it rained very hard during the day, and making a long march of twenty miles. The Tenth Illinois Infantry reported to Sixteenth Army Corps to-day, by orders of Lieut. Gen. U. S. Grant, through headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi. August 21, the Seventeenth New York Veteran Volunteer Infantry reported to First Brigade to-day. From the 28th of July up to the 23d day of August I have been temporarily (during the continued illness of General Davis) in command of the division, taking command of the division in all movements in the field. I have, therefore, in addition to reporting the movements of my own brigade, included that of the division during that time. On the 23d of August, General Davis having assumed command of Fo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
t East Tennessee Infantry; the enemy's batteries opened on us with solid shot this p. m.; no casualties. August 13 to 19, quietly occupying the same line of works, the firing in our front almost ceased. August 20, at 4 a. m. the command marched out on the Sandtown road, going around the rebel left and striking the Atlanta and West Point [Railroad] at Red Oak Station; troops in advance tore up the railroad some distance; returned to camp, having marched about twenty miles; no casualties. August 21 to 24, the regiment remained in camp, occupying the same line as on the 20th instant; the rebels shell us daily, with but little effect, otherwise the utmost quietness prevails; no firing on the skirmish line, and no casualties to report. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Jas. B. Cahill, Lieutenant-Colonel. Capt. T. Wiseman, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 14th Army Corps. Hdqrs. Sixteenth Illinois Infty. Vet. Vols., Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. In obedience t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 134 (search)
by division until nearly sundown, as support for Twenty-third Army Corps, who were advancing the lines; returned to camp after dark; marched seven and a half miles. August 20, moved out to position of yesterday (leaving camp long before day) and took breakfast, then moved four miles to the right and front, assisting to advance the lines. At 1.45 p. m. formed line of battle near the Montgomery railroad, and threw up temporary breastworks, in a driving rain; put out pickets in our front, and remained until 2.20 p. m., when we moved back to camp, arriving a little before dark, having marched fifteen miles; were very much exhausted. August 21, right wing moved to the left, and took the place of the battery, which had moved out. Until the 27th remained quietly in camp, doing picket duty in our front. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Charles M. Lum, Colonel Tenth Regiment Michigan Veteran Infantry. Capt. T. Wiseman, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 14th Army Corps.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 137 (search)
No. 133. report of Maj. Joel O. Martin, Seventeenth New York Infantry, of operations September 1. Hdqrs. Seventeenth Regt. New York Vet. Vols., Jonesborough, Ga., September 5, 1864. Lieutenant: I have the honor to make the following report in regard to the part taken by my regiment in the action of September 1: The regiment, under command of Col. William T. C. Grower, joined this command August 21, and accompanied it in its several marches till the p. m. of the 1st instant, nothing of especial interest occurring. Between 3 and 4 p. m. of the 1st instant the regiment was formed in rear of the Tenth Michigan, about one mile from the railroad, northeast of Jonesborough, Ga., and moved forward toward the enemy's works. The regiments in our front moved to the right, while the Seventeenth kept straight forward and came to a muddy ravine, grown up thick with brush, which was very difficult to cross; the regiment was crossed and formed as rapidly as possible; moved to the ri
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
rmishers and captured lines of rifle-pits, prisoners, arms, &c.; during the night strongly intrenched Seventy-eighth Illinois and Barnett's battery on picketline within 300 yards of the enemy's works. August 8, 9, 10, and 11, general appearance unchanged; firing constant. August 12, moved to the right and relieved portion of Twenty-third Corps east of Sandtown road. August 13 to 19, unchanged. August 19 and 20, held entire division-front with my brigade, returning to our camp at night. August 21 to 27, no material change; firing constant. August 27, moved south of Utoy Creek at 4 a. m. August 28, moved across the Montgomery railroad one mile to the southeast. August 29, assisted in destroying railroad. August 30, marched at 6 a. m.; went into camp half way between Jonesborough and Rough and Ready. August 31, marched to one and a half miles of Macon railroad. September 1, moved down the main Jonesborough road and formed line in center of division on range of hills north of
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