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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 409 409 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 15 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 15 15 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 14 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 11 11 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. You can also browse the collection for August 21st or search for August 21st in all documents.

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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 2: influence of Christian officers. (search)
ish of defeat, and that, whether in victory or defeat, our humble supplications are due at His footstool. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of these Confederate States, do issue this, my proclamation, setting apart Friday, the 21st day of August ensuing, as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer; and I do hereby invite the people of the Confederate States to repair on that day to their respective places of public worship, and to unite in supplication for the favor and protection ance of the fast-day appointed by President Davis in August, 1863, was as follows: General order no. 83. Headquarters, A. N. Va., August 13, 1863. The President of the Confederate States has, in the name of the people, appointed the 21st day of August as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer. A strict observance of the day is enjoined upon the officers and soldiers of this army. All military duties, except such as are absolutely necessary, will be suspended. The commanding officers
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
. Colonel Reed, of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and Dr. Bryson, Presbyterian; Rev. R. P. Ransom preaching oftener than any one during the meeting. I was appointed to superintend the erection of an arbor, and the soldiers constructed one that furnished us plenty of logs for seats and a penitent's form, mourner's bench, or anxious seat; and we had mourners at almost every service, which was held nightly and three times on Sunday, and occasionally happy professions of saving faith. August 21 had been appointed as a Day of fasting, humiliation, and prayer, by President Davis. Chaplains Willoughby, McVoy, Ellis, and myself consulted with regard to the propriety of a general service of the entire division. We agreed that a service for each brigade would be better. General Stewart acquiesced in the arrangement. In the forenoon Rev. R. P. Ransom preached on The Lord God Omnipotent reigneth; Rev. Mr. Bryson in the afternoon, and young John P. Mc-Ferrin at night. Four Tennessee