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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 325 325 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 32 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 23 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 18 18 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 17 17 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 17 17 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 12 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for August 29th or search for August 29th in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 31 document sections:

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
, the Army of the Cumberland was thrown forward upon the Atlanta and West Point Railroad at Red Oak, and the Army of the Tennessee at Shadna Church and Fairburn, while the Army of the Ohio was thrown into such a position along the road from Mount Gilead Church to Red Oak as to cover our left flank. Immediately upon striking the railroad the troops were intrenched and without the loss of a dozen men we had secure hold upon it, and could proceed to destroy it as leisurely as we pleased. August 29, the greater part of the army was at work destroying the railroad, which was effectually done for about twelve and a half miles, every tie being burned and every rail bent. The enemy did not attempt to disturb us. August 30, the army again in motion, being directed as follows: The Army of the Ohio toward Morrow's Mill, the Army of the Cumberland toward Couch's farm-house, and the Army of the Tennessee toward the Renfroe place. The latter pushed on still farther and succeeded in seizi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
ur pickets off the ridge occupied. The Thirty-eighth Illinois was immediately deployed as support. The Eighty-first Indiana rallied and charged the enemy, driving the lines back handsomely. The brigade was then withdrawn and marched off to the right in division column, and camped at night in rear of Fourteenth Army Corps. August 27, continued march to the right, and went into position near Mount Gilead Church. August 28, continued march, and went into position near West Point railroad. August 29, occupied same position; Thirty-first Indiana engaged in destroying railroad track. August 30, marched to position near Mud Creek. August 31, drove the enemy's skirmishers from works on the bank of creek, and camped one mile west of Macon railroad. September i, marched down Macon railroad, destroying track. About 3.30 p. m. became engaged with enemy's skirmishers, and drove them steadily before us to their main line near Jonesborough; formed junction with Fourteenth Army Corps battle lin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
e 25th of August. We received orders and marched to the right, seven miles south across Proctor's Creek, and rested until daylight on the morning of August 26, when, starting at 8 a. m., we moved with corps seven miles south across Utoy Creek and camped for the night. August 27, marched four miles south with the corps to Camp Creek and camped. August 28, marched three miles southeast to Red Oak Station, on West Point railroad, striking this road twelve miles southwest of the Atlanta. August 29, lay still and fortified. August 30, marched to Shoal Creek, distance five miles. August 31, the Army of the Tennessee fighting to-day in front and on the west of Jonesborough, Ga. Our corps advanced east, met cavalry behind works on the east bank of the Flint River. My brigade formed-Ninth Indiana, Eighty-fourth Illinois, and Eighty-fourth Indiana in front line-and with a strong skirmish line drove the enemy from their position and advanced, Wood's division in front, the Twenty-third Co
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
in our regiment were Major Carter slightly and 2 privates of Company B mortally [wounded]. All was quiet during the rest of the day. August 21, 22, 23, and 24, all quiet except some cannonading in our front. August 25, marched nearly all night to the right; met with no resistance. August 26, marched nearly all day to the right; nonveterans left for home. August 27, marched until 2 p. m. Pitched camp near New Hope Church; skirmish firing along the lines. August 28, marched until dark. August 29, all quiet; marched but a short distance. August 30, crossed the West Point railroad; marched south of Atlanta; regiment went on picket at night. August 31, regiment on picket; artillery shelling the enemy; no fighting. September 1, marched south on the Macon railroad and was engaged in tearing up and burning track nearly all day. During the engagement in the evening the regiment had 8 men slightly wounded. September 2, enemy evacuated Jonesborough, Ga., and retreated south. We fol
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 34 (search)
ommand with the brigade at 8 a. m. August 27, marched until about 12 m., at which time my regiment was formed in line of battle on the right of the front line of the brigade, which was in rear of the Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, near Camp Creek, Ga. My command was ordered to be ready to move at 7 a. m. August 28. Moved at 2 p. m. with the brigade; went into camp at sundown. My regiment was formed in line of battle in center of the front line of the brigade. On the morning of the 29th of August the general commanding ordered me to throw up a line of breast-works on the left of the front line of the brigade. On the morning of the 30th I was ordered to move my regiment with the brigade at 6 a. m. Moved to the right, crossing the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad. After marching to the right about five miles I was ordered to send a company out as flankers. The enemy fired on my command in the evening, wounding 1 man, the orderly, Company B. Marched until sunset, was ordered b
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
ctor's Creek, distance seven miles. On Friday, August 26, the regiment continued the march to the right, passing a portion of the Army of the Tennessee and the Fourteenth Army Corps, and encamped at 5 p. m., after marching about eight miles. On Saturday, August 27, advanced rapidly to Gilead Church, a distance of six miles. On Sunday, August 28, we marched, at about 3 p. m., a distance of about three miles, and bivouacked near the West Point railroad in a fine agricultural country. On Monday, August 29, the regiment assisted in destroying a large portion of the railroad. On Tuesday, August 30, we marched southeast, a distance of about three miles, and encamped in a thick woods. On Wednesday. August 31, we moved early in the morning and marched about fve miles to near the Macon railroad and encamped for the night. On Thursday, September I, we marched to the railroad and commenced destroying it. We moved down the railroad destroying it as we went, until we came near Jonesborough, w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
inging up the rear of the corps, and marched to Proctor's Creek. August 26, crossed Proctor's Creek, no enemy following but a thin skirmish line; crossed Utoy Creek and encamped, this division leading. August 27, left at 3 p. m., bringing up the rear of the corps and guarding the baggage train; passing the rest of the corps in camp, and crossed Camp Creek, covering the road to Fairburn. August 28, moved second in order of march, and took position near Red Oak, on the West Point railroad. August 29, remained in camp. August 30, marched first in order, and took position at Mann's house. Our march this day was much impeded by the Fourteenth Corps. August 31, crossed Crooked Creek at the mill; remained there to guard the trains and artillery, while the rest of the corps moved forward to strike the railroad. Toward evening took up position on the right of the First Division. September 1, marched toward Jonesborough by the railroad, destroying the track as we went, the First Division i
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
morning of the 28th formed the brigade in single line with one regiment in reserve between the First and Third. Built a line of works connecting with these two brigades, behind which we remained until about 3 p. m., when the command moved back about a mile on the road followed yesterday, and turned to the east and marched about three miles in the direction of the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad, and went into position on the right of the division and joining General Kimball's left. The 29th of August was spent in constructing works in the position taken last night, and on the 30th marched at 6.30 a. m. to about three and a half miles from Rough and Ready Station, on the Macon and Atlanta Railroad, where the brigade was formed in semicircular form, built works, and went into camp. On the 31st of August marched about two miles and took up a position separated from the rest of the division on the bank of Mud Creek, where we built works and went into camp for the night. About 2.30 a. m
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 77 (search)
n. Moved out the road about a mile and a half and found no enemy. I was relieved about 8 p. m. by a regiment from Newton's division, .and received orders to return to camp, and did so by 9 o'clock that night. We were under marching orders on the morning of August 28, and about 5 p. m. I was ordered to escort a part of the train of the corps. We moved forward toward the Montgomery railroad, and within about half a mile of it, and went into camp for the rest of the night. The morning of August 29 we moved out on the Montgomery road with orders to tear up the track; we tore up a portion of it, destroying it with fire, and returned to camp for the night. The morning of August 30 we moved the brigade about six miles, crossing the Montgomery road, and went into camp, the Seventy-ninth Indiana on the right and the Seventeenth Kentucky on the left. August 30, we received marching orders, and moved with the brigade in the direction of the Macon railroad, south of Rough and Ready Station
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 79 (search)
nt fusillade. We made several demonstrations upon the enemy's lines, and on the 24th of July carried their advanced rifle-pits, which enabled us to advance our picket-line some 200 yards. Three men wounded embrace all the casualties in my command during our stay before the city. On Thursday night, August 25, my battalion held the picketline during the withdrawal of the troops of our brigade. Our movements were now directed against the Montgomery railroad, which we struck at 7 a. m. 29th of August, twelve miles southwest of Atlanta, and participated in its destruction. On the afternoon of Wednesday, 31st, we reached the Macon railroad and formed our lines to protect the details engaged in its destruction. The next morning, September 1, we pushed forward four miles farther in the direction of Jonesborough and demolished the road at that point. At 4 p. m. marched toward Jonesborough, where some of our troops were engaged, and formed our lines in an open field about a mile north
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