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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 325 325 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 32 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 32 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 23 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 18 18 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 17 17 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 17 17 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 12 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for August 29th or search for August 29th in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
l Run was fought. About daylight, therefore, on the 29th of August, almost immediately after I received information of thf Groveton, to attack Relative positions at noon, Friday, August 29th. This map represents General Pope's view of the situation at noon, August 29th, with Longstreet placed at Gainesville; whereas, according to General Longstreet (see p. 510) a8th, dated Manassas Relative positions at sunset, Friday, August 29th. At noon of that day Porter's corps was in much teet's movements and operations on the afternoon of the 29th of August, when, it is alleged, he was held in check by Porter. General Lee says: The battle of Groveton, August 29th, as seen from Centreville. From a sketch made at the time. .ren Lee Goss says: At the end of the first day's battle, August 29th, so soon as the fighting ceased, many sought without ordhan a militia muster. When the battle ceased on the 29th of August, we were in possession of the field on our right, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
t.-Col. Robert B. Potter; 51st Pa., Col. John F. Hartranft. Brigade loss: k, 33; w, 156; m, 69 == 258. Kanawha division. First Provisional Brigade (engaged only at Bull Run Bridge, August 27th), Col. E. Parker Scarmmon: 11th Ohio, Maj. Lyman J. Jackson, Lieut.-Col. Augustus H. Coleman; 12th Ohio, Col. Carr B. White. Brigade loss: k, 14; w, 50; m, 42 = 106. Unattached, 30th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Theodore Jones; 36th Ohio, Col. George Crook. The loss of the Union army in the battles of August 29th and 30th is not separately reported. In all the combats of the campaign from the Rappahannock to the Potomac, the casualties amounted (approximately) to 1747 killed, 8452 wounded, and 4263 captured or missing = 14,462. The Confederate forces. Army of Northern Virginia--General Robert E. Lee. right wing, or Longstreet's Corps, Maj.-Gen. James Longstreet. Anderson's division, Maj.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead: 9th Va.,-----; 14
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The time of Longstreet's arrival at Groveton. (search)
enious device he managed to retain possession of his watch. He says: I awoke at 7 A. M., August 29th, by the Warrenton Pike, near Douglass's woods. A few yards away, under the trees, were sever — troops under Hatch southeast of Groveton. This action between Hood and Hatch at sunset, August 29th, was fought east, rather than west of Groveton, as laid down on the map [p. 473], which wouldre ready to march from the eastern end of Thoroughfare Gap at daylight on the morning of the 29th of August, but other troops filing past occupied the road, so that we did not move until a little afteat is, D. R. Jones's division of several thousand men — were in front of Porter all the day, 29th of August, and that General Pope is utterly mistaken when he says we were not. General E. M. Law, ave been many different statements as to the time of Longstreet's arrival at Manassas on the 29th of August. I am absolutely certain that Hood's division reached there not later than the time above s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The invasion of Maryland. (search)
as Lee's estimate as stated to me at the time. It is much above the estimate of those who have since written of this campaign. Colonel Charles Marshall, in his evidence in the Fitz John Porter case, gives our forces at the Second Manassas on August 29th as 50,000, not including artillery or cavalry. R. H. Anderson joined me on the night of August 29th, with over 4000.--J. L. Lee says officially that Antietam was fought with less than 40,000 men on our side.--Editors. who were in poor condAugust 29th, with over 4000.--J. L. Lee says officially that Antietam was fought with less than 40,000 men on our side.--Editors. who were in poor condition for battle, while McClellan had about 87,000, who were fresh and strong. The next year, when on our way to Gettysburg, there was the same situation of affairs at Harper's Ferry, but we let it alone. General Lee was not satisfied with the result of the Maryland campaign, and seemed inclined to attribute the failure to the Lost Dispatch; though I believe he was more inclined to attribute the loss of the dispatch to the fault of a courier or to other negligence than that of the officer
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The case of Fitz John Porter. (search)
ield of battle. None of this information, from the nature of the case, was, or could have been, before the courtmartial. By it, if established, an entirely new light was thrown upon the circumstances as they existed in Porter's front on the 29th of August. General Pope's orders of the 29th, which Porter was charged with disobeying, were as follows, the first, known as the joint order, having reached him about or shortly after noon: Generals McDowell and Porter: You will please move forw It is not possible that any court-martial could have condemned such conduct if it had been correctly understood. On the contrary, that conduct was obedient, subordinate, faithful, and judicious. It saved the Union army from disaster on the 29th of August. The board accordingly recommended to President Hayes to set aside the findings and sentence of the court-martial and to restore Porter to his rank in the service from the date of his dismissal. In the absence of legislation, President