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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 182 182 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 19 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 19 19 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 19 19 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry. You can also browse the collection for September 3rd or search for September 3rd in all documents.

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mous duelling ground of slavery days. (The Colonel was evidently not a participant in the melon-patch episode just outside of Philadelphia, while the train was waiting on a siding for other trains to pass. Colonel Cronkite says that the tedium of the wait was relieved by a raid on a neighboring melon patch in which more than half of the regiment participated; and that, led by an officer, they returned to the train laden with a melon each.) The regiment in box cars arrived in Washington on Sept. 3d, in the morning and arrived at Hyattsville in the afternoon. Major Olcott, having been sent ahead to get instructions, was asked by the commanding officer whether the regiment was from the country and had good choppers in it. The major answered that it was from an agricultural and dairy section, and did not contain many axemen. There the matter ended. This journey from Camp Schuyler to Washington, made so quietly and orderly, so soon after the muster of the regiment, demonstrates the rem
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 16: with Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley (search)
arch, passed through Winchester at 8 A. M. Camped on Opequon Creek at 4:30 P. M. August 18: Marched at 6 A. M. via Berryville and camped two miles from Charlestown. August 21: Enemy appeared at 8 A. M. Skirmished all day. August 22: Retired at 2 A. M. toward Harper's Ferry. Camped on former ground. At 12 M. moved to Crook's left and remained in reserve. August 28: Marched at 1 A. M. and camped eleven and one-half miles from Charlestown, in position held on the 21st inst. September 3: Marched to a position near Clifton and remained until Sept 19. September 19: Broke camp at 3:30 A. M., crossed the Opequon Creek at 9 A. M. To fill in the incidents of this period of apparently erratic movement, resort must be made to Colonel Beckwith's narrative. He writes, While at Halltown, Colonel Olcott and quite a number of men, who had been away wounded and sick, returned to the regiment and increased its strength and appearance materially. On the 16th we started back dow