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Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 1 1 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 1 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 1 1 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 1 1 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 14, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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General McClellan's speech.--A correspondent takes the poetic license of thus paraphrasing General McClellan's recent patriotic address to his soldiers: We've had our last retreat, We've seen our last defeat; You stand by me, and I will stand by you; Like Lane instructed, we will “put it through.” --N. Y. Herald, Sept. 12
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
n the field, Atlanta, Georgia, September 20, 1864. Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant, Commander-in-Chief, City Point, Virginia. General: I have the honor to acknowledge, at the hands of Lieutenant-Colonel Porter, of your staff, your letter of September 12th, and accept with thanks the honorable and kindly mention of the services of this army in the great cause in which we are all engaged. I send by Colonel Porter all official reports which are completed, and will in a few days submit a list ote, W. T. Sherman, Major-General commanding. headquarters military division of the Mississippi, in the field, Atlanta, Georgia, September 14, 1864. General J. B. Hood, commanding Army of the Tennessee, Confederate Army. General: Yours of September 12th is received, and has been carefully perused. I agree with you that this discussion by two soldiers is out of place, and profitless; but you must admit that you began the controversy by characterizing an official act of mine in unfair and imp
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
Government. W. T. Sherman, Major-General. I have not the least doubt that Governor Brown, at that time, seriously entertained the proposition; but he hardly felt ready to act, and simply gave a furlough to the militia, and called a special session of the Legislature, to meet at Milledgeville, to take into consideration the critical condition of affairs in the State. On the 20th of September Colonel Horace Porter arrived from General Grant, at City Point, bringing me the letter of September 12th, asking my general views as to what should next be done. He staid several days at Atlanta, and on his return careied back to Washington my full reports of the past campaign, and my letter of September 20th to General Grant in answer to his of the 12th. About this time we detected signs of activity on the part of the enemy. On the 21st Hood shifted his army across from the Macon road, at Lovejoy's, to the West Point road, at Palmetto Station, and his cavalry appeared on the west side
The next day he was ordered to Martinsburgh, to take command of the forces there. On the twelfth of September he again returned to Harper's Ferry, where he remained until the surrender, without assumth New-York and the Thirty-ninth New York (Garibaldi Guards) were sent him on Friday, the twelfth of September, and on the morning of the thirteenth he was further reinforced by the One Hundred and Fid, and a wagon-load of ammunition. Gen. White, on his return to Harper's Ferry, on the twelfth of September, suggested to Col. Miles the propriety of contracting his lines on Bolivar Heights so as take the place — knew that the place was under a tremendous cannonade from daylight on Friday, September twelfth, till dark; again from day-break Saturday till dark; from half-past 2 P. M. Sunday, thJackson, the remainder of General White's brigade fell back to the Ferry. The fight of Friday, September 12. On the morning of this day, the enemy had begun to make their appearance, three miles
The next day he was ordered to Martinsburgh, to take command of the forces there. On the twelfth of September he again returned to Harper's Ferry, where he remained until the surrender, without assumth New-York and the Thirty-ninth New York (Garibaldi Guards) were sent him on Friday, the twelfth of September, and on the morning of the thirteenth he was further reinforced by the One Hundred and Fid, and a wagon-load of ammunition. Gen. White, on his return to Harper's Ferry, on the twelfth of September, suggested to Col. Miles the propriety of contracting his lines on Bolivar Heights so as take the place — knew that the place was under a tremendous cannonade from daylight on Friday, September twelfth, till dark; again from day-break Saturday till dark; from half-past 2 P. M. Sunday, thJackson, the remainder of General White's brigade fell back to the Ferry. The fight of Friday, September 12. On the morning of this day, the enemy had begun to make their appearance, three miles
used very little medicine with his men, it cost so much, and he, for his part, preferred whisky or brandy. As the troops filed up Patrick street, by way of Hagerstown, one of them asked, Where does this road lead to? To Hagerstown, he was told. And which way is Baltimore? he said. Fifty-five miles in the opposite direction, he was told. The devil! Do you hear that, Bill? We are marching from instead of to Baltimore, and they then had an excited conversation, and passed on. Twelfth September.--About ten o'clock our pickets were announced approaching, and how every one brightened up is difficult to tell on paper. About six hundred cavalry were concealed in a bend in Patrick street awaiting their arrival. On our advance cavalry guard came. Charge! was the order on both sides, and a short skirmish took place in the streets opposite McPherson's house. I was within fifty yards of it and saw it. What an exciting time there was then! Pistols firing — men shouting and brandis
Doc. 205.-fight on the Mississippi. Surgeon read's report. Carrollton, near New Orleans, September 12. To Governor Morton: sir: I have to report that the Twenty-first regiment of Indiana volunteers performed a very brilliant achievement on the eighth instant, twenty-five miles from New-Orleans, up the Mississippi and on its right bank, in utterly routing and dispersing five hundred mounted Texan Rangers, driving them into the swamps and capturing most of their horses. The guerrillas had for some time been molesting our steamers by firing into them, as they passed up and down. News reached headquarters that a regiment of Texan Rangers had come to aid in these outrages, and our regiment, with two others, were ordered up to disperse them, part to land above and part to land below them, to preclude the possibility of their escape. On the night of the seventh a part of the Fourth Wisconsin embarked on a transport, and at daylight next morning landed at the supposed place
ecatur road. September 3.--Quarters erected by the men. September 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10.--Remained in same position. September 11.--Moved camp three hundred yards to the rear, and erected comfortable, neat, and uniform quarters. September 12 to 17, inclusive.--Remained in same camp, having drills, roll-calls, guard-mount, and dress-parade daily. September 18.--This regiment paraded for review with the division, but the review was prevented by rain. September 19.--Raised a floment. On the fourth of September, 1864, we did strike tents at the Chattahoochee River and entered Atlanta at eleven o'clock A. M., where we pitched camp on the north side of the city at the old inner rebel works; where we stopped until September twelfth, when we were detailed to take charge of the military confederate prisoners till October fourth, 1864. During October sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth, we were ordered to go on a foraging expedition in charge of Colonel R
61 Major Griffith's Report. headquarters Forty-Sixth regiment. Pennsylvania veteran Vols., Savannah, Ga., Dec. 26, 1864. Captain D. W. Palmer, Assistant Adjutant-General, First Brigade: sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my regiment since the occupation of Atlanta. September second, marched from the south bank of the Chattahoochee River through the city of Atlanta, and camped on the north side of the Decatur road at the rebel works. September twelfth, moved camp to the north side of the city. September seventeenth, division reviewed by General Williams. September nineteenth, division reviewed by General Slocum. October twentieth, Colonel James L. Selfridge took command of the First brigade. October twenty-first, moved out the Decatur road on a foraging expedition under command of Colonel. October twenty-third, Colonel Carman came out with Second brigade to support us, and took command; arrived in camp October twenty-sixth at fo
Nicholas Grumback, Major Commanding Regiment. Lieutenant-Colonel Doane's Report. headquarters Thirty-Third Massachusetts volunteers, Savannah, Georgia, Dec. 24, 1864. Lieutenant Pliny E. Watson, Aid-de-Camp: sir: In accordance with circular received at these headquarters I have the honor to submit the following report: This regiment entered Atlanta Monday, September fifth, and was immediately assigned to duty as guard at the military prison upon Peachtree street. Monday, September twelfth, it was relieved from this duty and ordered to report to Colonel W. Cogswell, Second Massachusetts volunteers, Post Commandant, for duty as provost-guard. The regiment was continued upon this duty during the occupation of the city by our forces. During this period no foraging-parties were sent out, but a small detail accompanied two general foraging expeditions, and brought in each time a wagonload of corn-fodder. November sixteenth, the regiment broke camp and started upon th
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