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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
Stevens, Esq., a citizen of the town, added, from his own means and of his own accord, the sum of five dollars to each of the bounties. Another meeting was held on the 29th of August, at which the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each person who shall volunteer for nine months service, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; and to authorize the treasurer to borrow money sufficient to pay the same. 1863. A meeting was held on the 22d of September, at which the following vote was passed:— Voted, To raise the sum of two thousand seven hundred and thirty-five dollars and ninety cents, as the proportion of the town of New Marlborough, for reimbursing the Commonwealth for bounty money, assumed by said Commonwealth; and appropriate the same for the payment of said proportion, in accordance with section 9, chapter 218, of the Acts of the Legislature of 1863. 1864. At the town-meeting held April 4th, five thousand seven hundred
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
ar, was held on the 13th of May, at which it was voted to pay each volunteer a dollar a day, for one month, previous to going into camp. October 14th, Voted, to raise money to aid the wives and children of volunteers, in accordance with the act of the Legislature. 1862. July 25th, Voted, to raise eight hundred dollars to pay bounties to eight volunteers for three years military service, who shall enlist to fill the quota of the town, under the late call of the President for more men. September 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for nine months service, and be credited to the quota of the town. Eleven men were required. December 17th, Voted, to procure two volunteers, at one hundred dollars each, to prevent a draft, or if two men are drafted to pay them the same. 1863. September 28th, Voted, to raise thirteen hundred and sixty-seven dollars to pay bounties to volunteers to fill the quota of the town. 1864. June 11th, Voted,
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
ta of the town. Voted, to pay the same aid to the families of those soldiers who have died in the service as is paid to the families of the living. August 28th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, enlisting to the credit of the town; also voted, that if any volunteer from Brimfield shall be sick or wounded, and is in need of care or attention, it shall be furnished at the expense of the town. 1863. September 22d, Voted, to furnish aid to the families of men who have been or may hereafter be drafted into the military service of the United States. 1864. April 4th, Voted, to appropriate twelve hundred dollars for the payment of bounties to volunteers; also, to fix the bounty to be paid to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town for three years at one hundred and twenty-five dollars; and the selectmen were authorized to keep on recruiting, and to pay the same amount of bounty to the 1
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
ellion the North have taken up arms, not to conquer the South, but to protect the Constitution of our country and enforce the laws passed under it; and we will never lay them down until this is accomplished, and treason and rebellion forever extirpated from our land. August 5th, A bounty of one hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine months service. September 5th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow fifteen thousand dollars to pay bounties to volunteers. September 22d, The bounty to nine months men was raised fifty dollars. 1863. August 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to aid the families of deceased and disabled soldiers, and the families of men who may be drafted. 1864. March 30th, Voted, to raise four thousand seven hundred dollars to refund money paid by private citizens for bounties and to encourage recruiting. The bounty to volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. August 3d, Thi
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
September 1st, This order was laid on the table by a vote of 7 to 4. September 8th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of Boston. The treasurer was authorized to borrow three hundred and fifty thousand dollars to pay the same. Resolutions of respect to the memory and of condolence to the family of Colonel Fletcher Webster were introduced by Alderman Henshaw and were unanimously adopted. September 22d, Ordered, to cease paying bounties to nine-months men on and after October 1st. October 2d, The time for paying bounties was extended to the 15th. The quota of Boston being nearly filled an order was passed, October 27th, giving power to the mayor to cease paying bounties when he shall receive satisfactory evidence of the quota being filled. November 4th, The mayor reported that Boston had filled her quotas and had a surplus of six hundred and sixty men; but advised that three companie
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
ears and be credited to the quota of the town to the number of twenty-five. August 25th, The same amount of bounty was directed to be paid to each volunteer for nine months service; thirty-five hundred dollars were appropriated to pay the same. It would appear that, in addition to the hundred dollars voted by the town, a sufficient amount was raised by private subscription to make the bounty one hundred and sixty-five dollars, which money was refunded to the subscribers by a vote passed September 22d. Other meetings were held during the war to encourage recruiting and provide means for the payment of bounties to volunteers and State aid to their families. Warren furnished, according to the returns made by the selectmen in 1866, two hundred and three men for the war; but as Warren had a surplus of thirty-one over and above all demands, we think the number actually furnished and credited must have been about two hundred and twenty-eight. Four were commissioned officers. The whol