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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
ing in the sun seemed as an illustration of the light which I hope to gain. September 30. A performance of Jarley's Waxworks in the evening was much enjoyed. Edward Atkinson as Mrs. Partington in my witch hat recited some merry nonsense of Hood's about European travel. October 2. Boston. In the early morning John M. Forbes's yacht, the Wild Duck, hovered around us, hoping to take off his daughter, Mrs. Russell.... Quite a number of us embraced this opportunity with gratitude.... October 3. All seems like a dream. October 7. Newport. I begin my life here with a prayer that the prolongation of my days on earth may be for good to myself and others, that I may not sink into senile folly or grossness, nor yet wander into aesthetic conceit, but carry the weight of my experience in humility, in all charity, and in a loving and serviceable spirit. The last entry in the Journal for 1892 strikes the keynote of what was to prove the most absorbing interest of the coming year.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Fourth battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. (search)
8, making its bead. quarters at Fort Pike, La., it took part in several expeditions by water; it was engaged without loss at Bonfouca, La., Nov. 26, 1862, and again on December 23. The section which accompanied General Weitzel's brigade through the La Fourche district was engaged at Labadievllle, La., Oct. 25, 1862. In the spring of 1863 the battery took part in the siege of Port Hudson, being in action on May 27 and June 13 and 14. It was next engaged in the expedition to the Teche from Oct. 3 to Nov. 16, 1863, being engaged at Vermilion Bayou, La., October 9 and also on November 11. In January, 1864, almost the entire battery re-enlisted as veteran volunteers, and were on furlough of 30 days from February 11, after which, on April 6, it was stationed at New Orleans, La. On the 5th of September, 1864, it was transferred to Morganza, La., and on September 16 engaged in an expedition to Bayou Fordoche; a part of the battery, under Lieutenant Manning, engaged in a skirmish to the At
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Fifth battery Massachusetts Light Artillery. (search)
863, to May 1, 1864, the battery occupied winter quarters at Rappahannock Station. On May 5 it entered into action in the Wilderness, Va., being engaged at Spotsylvania May 12, and having made frequent changes of position with slight engagements during May, on June 2 and 3 was in action at Bethesda Church, Va. It was engaged again June 18, 1864, in front of Petersburg; encamped at the Jerusalem Plank Road until July 29, 1864; was present at the explosion of the mine, Petersburg, July 30, and took part in the action at the Weldon Railroad, August 21. On the 3d of October the battery parted with 1 officer and 29 men, their term of service having expired, but the battery as a whole continued in service with the 5th Corps and remained in the vicinity of the Jerusalem Plank Road for the winter. Its final action was in the assault on Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865. On June 4, 1865, the battery left Virginia for Massachusetts, and on the 12th of June was mustered out at Readville, Mass.
y in the year 1634, about the beginning of the winter, he embarked at Harwich, having with him brother Champney, Frost, Goffe, and divers others, most dear saints, who afterwards were inhabitants of Cambridge. They were driven back by stress of weather, and the voyage was abandoned. But about the 10th of August, 1635, he again embarked; land so the Lord, after many sad storms and wearisome days and many longings to see the shore, brought us to the sight of it upon Oct. 2, 1635, and upon Oct. the 3d, we arrived with my wife, child, brother Samuel, Mr. Harlakenden, Mr. Cooke, &c., at Boston.—When we had been here two days, upon Monday Oct. 5, we came (being sent for by friends at Newtown) to them, to my brother Mr. Stone's house; and that congregation being upon their removal to Hartford at Connecticut, myself and those that came with me found many houses empty and many persons willing to sell, and here our company bought off their houses to dwell in until we should see another place
We hear from Cambridge, that Mr. William Patten, Representative for the town of Billerica, being taken sick of the small-pox, while the General Assembly was sitting there, is since dead, and was interred on Monday last, the 5th instant. On Saturday, Oct. 3, the Court was adjourned to meet at Roxbury on the next Wednesday. Again, in 1752, the small-pox caused the cessation of study in College from April 22 until Sept. 2; and the corporation voted, May 4, that there be no public Commencement this year, and in October voted to have no winter vacation. The town appointed a committee, May 18, to devise measures to prevent the spreading of the disease, and on the 3d of October, voted that a public contribution be in the three parts of this town, next Lord's-day come seven night, for the speedy raising of money to defray the charges the town have been at in the support, &c., of sundry persons lately visited with the small-pox, belonging to this town. Also voted that the thanks of this
17 Aug. 1668, m. Samuel Hastings, Jr.; Edward, b. 2 Aug. 1670; Mary, b. 7 Mar. 1671-2, m. Joseph Hovey 10 Dec. 1702, and Nathaniel Parker of Newton 27 Jan. 1736-7; Lydia, b. 22 Feb. 1673-4, d. young. The deaths of Thomas and the third John are stated on the authority of a manuscript genealogy by the late Rev. John Marrett of Burlington. John the f. was a shoemaker, and after 1682 resided a few rods westerly from the Craigie House in the former mansion of Deac. John Bridge. He. d. between 3 Oct. and 16 Dec. 1695; his w. Abigail survived and was prob. the same who d. 15 Mar. 1721-2. 3. Thomas, s. of Thomas (1), taught school in Dedham from Dec. 1659 to July 1661; and is named in his father's will 15 Oct. 1663. 4. Amos, s. of John (2), m. Bethia Longhorn 2 Nov. 1681; she d. 20 Nov. 1730, a. 69, and he m. Ruth, wid. of Jona. Dunster, 22 Nov. 1732, who survived him, and m. Peter Hayes of Stoneham 1742. Mr. Marrett, generally known as Lieut. Marrett, was by occupation a farmer an
17 Aug. 1668, m. Samuel Hastings, Jr.; Edward, b. 2 Aug. 1670; Mary, b. 7 Mar. 1671-2, m. Joseph Hovey 10 Dec. 1702, and Nathaniel Parker of Newton 27 Jan. 1736-7; Lydia, b. 22 Feb. 1673-4, d. young. The deaths of Thomas and the third John are stated on the authority of a manuscript genealogy by the late Rev. John Marrett of Burlington. John the f. was a shoemaker, and after 1682 resided a few rods westerly from the Craigie House in the former mansion of Deac. John Bridge. He. d. between 3 Oct. and 16 Dec. 1695; his w. Abigail survived and was prob. the same who d. 15 Mar. 1721-2. 3. Thomas, s. of Thomas (1), taught school in Dedham from Dec. 1659 to July 1661; and is named in his father's will 15 Oct. 1663. 4. Amos, s. of John (2), m. Bethia Longhorn 2 Nov. 1681; she d. 20 Nov. 1730, a. 69, and he m. Ruth, wid. of Jona. Dunster, 22 Nov. 1732, who survived him, and m. Peter Hayes of Stoneham 1742. Mr. Marrett, generally known as Lieut. Marrett, was by occupation a farmer an
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1841. (search)
ather want of action,— for we have work enough,— by assuring me that our previous hardships are nothing to those we shall, have to face in the field. But I have no faith in it. I believe that no possibility of camp life in the field can take us by surprise. In fact, I suspect it is a general aspiration in the regiment, not confined to field and staff, to take our chance of some hard knocks from the Rebels, rather than die of mildew in these wretched fens near the Potomac. Fort Albany, October 3. Your pleasant picture of placid, rural Concord takes me miles away from this war-blasted scene, and brings to my mind the murmuring pines and elms of the Avenue and North Branch, and the lowing of cattle and song of birds which usher in a Concord nightfall. Here no bird is heard, but a few desolate cat-owls in the night; all the rest of the feathered tribe have been frightened off by the laying bare to the glare of the sun their ancient shady retreats, where the woods were all felle
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1859. (search)
d some time this month. September 6.—Hot days, cold nights. Pity the men without any shelter, and there are thousands. September 7.—Begin to move the men out, some say for exchange, and some; to enter another Bull Pen. September 9.—Still moving out the men. September 11.–--The good work still going on. September 12. At this date, the journal is discontinued, although its writer did not leave Andersonville till the 19th of September. From this time till the 3d of October, the day of his arrival at Savannah, he was on his passage to and from Lovejoy, and wandering in the swamps, having escaped from his captors, though only to fall into the enemy's hands again in a few days. From Savannah he was transferred to Millen, where, on the 30th of October, just three months after his first capture, he was released by God from the cruelties inflicted by man. The best account of the intervening epoch is to be found in the narratives of his fellow-soldiers. Mr. Wh
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
ey to Gibraltar was bad. The first day it rained the whole time, so that I was wet through to the skin, and yet was able to advance no farther than Marbella, where I was received by the hostess of the poor little inn with a genuine, faithful kindness I can never forget. This is generally the case in Spain. If you really want assistance, if you are really suffering, you are sure to meet nothing but good-will. In Gibraltar I remained from the morning of the 30th September to noon on the 3d of October, and passed my time pleasantly, except that it made me not a little homesick to find so many countrymen there, to hear English everywhere talked, and to look forth from the summit of the rock upon the Atlantic, which I had not seen for above three years, and which seems but a slight separation between me and my home. . . . . The governor, General Don, Later, General Sir George Don, G. C. B. The name always puzzled the Spaniards, who asked, Don what? to whom I had letters, was very
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